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Review Group Week 203 - WEBCOMICS

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thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Sat Jan 02, 2010 2:53 pm

doombug wrote:you can find it in the first post of the thread. 8)

then you should back track and read the lengthy introduction to my Sugar Shock review.
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Eric Ratcliffe

Staff Writer

Postby Eric Ratcliffe » Sat Jan 02, 2010 3:10 pm

thefourthman wrote:then you should back track and read the lengthy introduction to my Sugar Shock review.


I did read your sugarshock review and the other review from I'm assuming your daughter which was amusing.

I dug sugarshock and think it's stronger then buffy season 8. but that's just me.
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Sun Jan 03, 2010 11:20 am

The other webcomic I read this week is called Femme Noir, by Christopher Mills & Joe Staton:

http://www.femme-noir.com/index.html

The three online stories are fun, with a Dick Tracy sort of feel and a sort of stereotypical female reporter/crimefighter. Femme Noir is all about celebrating those old newspaper strips, and the creators do a great job evoking the spirit of them while adding a few touches of their own.

Although the means to view them online was fast & convenient, the lettering was a little hard to make out on my screen which sometimes kept me from staying engrossed in the narrative. I've been surprised at the sheer number of webcomics out there this week, but I still don't feel 100% comfortable reading them in this format.

8
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thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Sun Jan 03, 2010 12:35 pm

House of J wrote:The other webcomic I read this week is called Femme Noir, by Christopher Mills & Joe Staton:

http://www.femme-noir.com/index.html

The three online stories are fun, with a Dick Tracy sort of feel and a sort of stereotypical female reporter/crimefighter. Femme Noir is all about celebrating those old newspaper strips, and the creators do a great job evoking the spirit of them while adding a few touches of their own.

Although the means to view them online was fast & convenient, the lettering was a little hard to make out on my screen which sometimes kept me from staying engrossed in the narrative. I've been surprised at the sheer number of webcomics out there this week, but I still don't feel 100% comfortable reading them in this format.

8

there was a three issue mini-series of that published by Ape Entertainment.
http://brokenfrontier.com/reviews/p/det ... -1-advance
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Sun Jan 03, 2010 3:31 pm

thefourthman wrote:there was a three issue mini-series of that published by Ape Entertainment.
http://brokenfrontier.com/reviews/p/det ... -1-advance


I think I read that on the site as well. It's a good read if you don't expect it to be something it isn't, Criminal for example.

What happened to Amlah6's goal to review a new webcomic every day? This place is boring today.
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48THRiLLS

Review Grouper

Postby 48THRiLLS » Sun Jan 03, 2010 4:47 pm

High Moon
I spent the last few days reading this zuda based web comic. Take 2 things I love dearly, westerns and werewolves and put em together and it is instant win. I will admit some of the frames were a little hard to follow but in the end it was a pretty fun read. The art was ok at first but either it grew on me or it hit it's stride after about 30 pages or so. I do think that they killed off a main character a little too soon and utilized their twist in the story a little impatiently but maybe that is the type of pacing web comics have? I dunno? I am not sure that I like reading comics on my computer, I still think I prefer the floppies but this was a pretty good introduction for me but I will admit to hoping digital comics are not the next evolution of comics but I also fear change so what the hell... anyways if you feel like killing some time check out this supernatural western tale, there are worse things you could be doing.
STORY - 7
ART - 8
OVERALL 7.5
User avatar

Old Man

cheese

Postby Old Man » Sun Jan 03, 2010 7:03 pm

I decided to review until I couldn't take it any more. From a list in the first post, I started with Other Webcomics, did 5 of them, then decided to do 2 from Harvey Nominees, and 2 from Eisner Nominees. Then I was done. I didn't do the Eisner Nominees. Too tired. Sorry, guys from the site, but I'm not going to review your work.

Year of the Rat -- I can't make heads nor tails of what is going on. Obviously, it's supposed to be some kind of dream thingy, so maybe it's supposed to be disjointed. The art is consistently bland and the writing needs help.

From episode 84 http://magicinkwell.com/?p=1668

"The only way for you to become the person you once were again,..."

would be so much better if written

"The only way for you to once again become the person you were,..."

Grade: Unacceptable.
____________________

XKCD -- Oh, really? You wasted my time with this? Teenagers could do better than this. Also? Very poor use of size. Either the strip is about 30% of screen size, or too tiny to be read without blowing it up much larger, making it necessary to scroll around to read it.

Grade: Somebody should shoot your grandmother.
____________________

Wondermark -- At first look, I was intrigued by the art on the main page. After looking at several strips, not so much. As you all know, I am not a fan of repeated panels, and that is what this entire strip is. There were a couple amusing strips, but not enough to make me come back.

Grade: Neutral
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Sin Titulo -- Yawn...another dream sequence to start this strip. Are all writers (and I may be using that term loosely) horny for dream sequences? Use of one color only is boring after a while.

Grade: Less than neutral, meaning not for me; may be fine for others.
____________________

Shortpacked -- I actually liked this one, proving, I hope, that I am not too old to like new things. Special bonus points for the cute Christmas Day posting. http://www.shortpacked.com/d/20091225.html

Grade: Acceptable
____________________

The Night Owls -- Quite liked it. Flying Monkey. Aside from the comic, the viewer (it's a Zuda comic) restrains the viewing of the strip. You can make the strip as large as you need it, but the viewer limits how much can be viewed, making you have to scroll to see the whole thing. I only needed it to be about 10% bigger to make for easier reading, but even that small amount is problematic.

Grade: More than acceptable
____________________

Least I Could Do -- Funny at times, amusing at others, okay at others. With but a small change in a few words, this could be a daily and Sunday strip. The January 3 strip was funny. It's on the front page as I write this. http://leasticoulddo.com/

Grade: Good
____________________

I'm sure there are several good online comics. I don't have the time nor inclination to find them. One, I already spend too much time looking at a computer screen. It's hard on the eyes. Two, as the comics are online, that means there is so much more chance of amateurish work being presented. If mainstream comics companies can't maintain any decent level of quality, there is just no way that most people posting their strips on the internet can come anywhere close to maintaining a professional level of work. Yes, there will be the occasional gem to be found, but I look at it this way: If it is good enough to be collected and published in paper form, I may eventually find it interesting enough to buy and read.
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Sun Jan 03, 2010 7:11 pm

Old Man's going to be squinting for a week.

In terms of viewers, Bleedingcool has a great one--most of them are serviceable, some of them suck too hard to continue no matter how much I liked the comic. Now that I've looked at a number of them, I am renewing my commitment to paper for the foreseeable future. Besides simply a better viewer, changes would have to be made in the computer's screen itself before I would ever "go digital".
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guitarsmashley

Regular-Sized Poster

Postby guitarsmashley » Sun Jan 03, 2010 8:42 pm

48THRiLLS wrote:High Moon
I spent the last few days reading this zuda based web comic. Take 2 things I love dearly, westerns and werewolves and put em together and it is instant win. I will admit some of the frames were a little hard to follow but in the end it was a pretty fun read. The art was ok at first but either it grew on me or it hit it's stride after about 30 pages or so. I do think that they killed off a main character a little too soon and utilized their twist in the story a little impatiently but maybe that is the type of pacing web comics have? I dunno? I am not sure that I like reading comics on my computer, I still think I prefer the floppies but this was a pretty good introduction for me but I will admit to hoping digital comics are not the next evolution of comics but I also fear change so what the hell... anyways if you feel like killing some time check out this supernatural western tale, there are worse things you could be doing.
STORY - 7
ART - 8
OVERALL 7.5

I think this is what I'll end up reading as well.
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thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Sun Jan 03, 2010 8:47 pm

House of J wrote:Old Man's going to be squinting for a week.

In terms of viewers, Bleedingcool has a great one--most of them are serviceable, some of them suck too hard to continue no matter how much I liked the comic. Now that I've looked at a number of them, I am renewing my commitment to paper for the foreseeable future. Besides simply a better viewer, changes would have to be made in the computer's screen itself before I would ever "go digital".

this is the way I feel. Even with an acceptable viewer like the Zuda program, the print versions are just so much better. It is easier on the eyes, if I want to check something out for some reason it isn't some series of backing out, I just turn to the fucking page.

Also, I like books. I like the way they feel. I like the way they smell. I like the way the color seeps into paper. I just like books.

I did look at the nook while I was waiting on the movie today and that thing is pretty impressive. It seems like a much better reading vehicle than morgan's kindle.
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:02 pm

thefourthman wrote:this is the way I feel. Even with an acceptable viewer like the Zuda program, the print versions are just so much better. It is easier on the eyes, if I want to check something out for some reason it isn't some series of backing out, I just turn to the fucking page.

Also, I like books. I like the way they feel. I like the way they smell. I like the way the color seeps into paper. I just like books.

I did look at the nook while I was waiting on the movie today and that thing is pretty impressive. It seems like a much better reading vehicle than morgan's kindle.


<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/18/technology/companies/18amazon.html" target="_blank">1984</a>

Readers and travelers might favor those goldurned plastic crapboxes, but book lovers are who pay the bills. There is a random chance to browsing a true book shop (not a Half Assed Books full of publishers overstock) that will never be improved upon by sitting at home on your ass. Which reminds me, read Hannah Arendt's Origins of Totalitarianism if you haven't (in book form if you please) and then let's talk about the kind of convenience-driven future being crafted for kids like Morgan by our captains of industry, and what she might never know she's lost in the deal. ( :smt006 Hi Royal Nonesuch!)
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thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:07 pm

House of J wrote:<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/18/technology/companies/18amazon.html" target="_blank">1984</a>

Readers and travelers might favor those goldurned plastic crapboxes, but book lovers are who pay the bills. There is a random chance to browsing a true book shop (not a Half Assed Books full of publishers overstock) that will never be improved upon by sitting at home on your ass. Which reminds me, read Hannah Arendt's Origins of Totalitarianism if you haven't (in book form if you please) and then let's talk about the kind of convenience-driven future being crafted for kids like Morgan by our captains of industry, and what she might never know she's lost in the deal. ( :smt006 Hi Royal Nonesuch!)

hey dammit. I teach morgan all about how things are different in real form.

I saw a book at the bookstore today about a book thief, it looked cool... do you know which one it was?... it was recent and in hardcover had a bunch of bookcases on the cover, was based on a true story and had to do with literary obsession.
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:12 pm

thefourthman wrote:hey dammit. I teach morgan all about how things are different in real form.

I saw a book at the bookstore today about a book thief, it looked cool... do you know which one it was?... it was recent and in hardcover had a bunch of bookcases on the cover, was based on a true story and had to do with literary obsession.


Is it this one?

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... =121489286
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thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:14 pm


yes. thanks. have you read it?
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Sun Jan 03, 2010 9:30 pm

thefourthman wrote:yes. thanks. have you read it?


Not yet, I usually wait and buy used for almost everything these days, things start turning up pretty quickly. That being said, I may keep an eye out for a cheap copy.

Of course it's a famous case--and it's the same mindset a person who shoplifts a $20 book has.

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