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A Query #2:What comic changed the way you felt about comics?

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Postby Keb » Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:16 pm

In middle school (grades 7-8, right?) we were taught all about the war of 1812. heh.

They didn't teach us about the holocaust then. They probably did in high school but I never took history until I got to university. Since then I've done a lot of reading on WWII (both in 20th Century History and Literature of Trauma and Recovery) but no graphic novels were taught.

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Postby thefourthman » Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:22 pm

Keb wrote:In middle school (grades 7-8, right?) we were taught all about the war of 1812. heh.

They didn't teach us about the holocaust then. They probably did in high school but I never took history until I got to university. Since then I've done a lot of reading on WWII (both in 20th Century History and Literature of Trauma and Recovery) but no graphic novels were taught.

we learned about WWII in middle school and I spent the next four years with my head in books about it, for some reason the idea that there was an evil so great that pretty much the rest of the world rose to fight it fascinated me.

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Postby Jubilee » Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:45 pm

Maus and Runaways can be added to my list as well :D

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Postby Zero » Fri Jul 04, 2008 11:22 pm

I started with some random issues of The X-Files comic (Charlie Adlard of Walking Dead art!) and then moved up to reading Preacher and Sandman in the library. As a result, I never really had the love of superheroes that most fans do. I still read a few, because they make up the majority of content in the medium, but they've always beena guilty pleasure compared to the standard stuff that I began with.

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Postby Starlord » Sat Jul 05, 2008 2:02 am

for me it had to be the entire run of Uncanny X-Men #99 through #138. From the birth of Phoenix, the battle with Magneto in the Antartica and the seperation of the team. The Savage Land adventure, Proteus, and finally the build up of The HellFire Club, and Jason Wyngrade is really Mastermind, who has helped create Dark Phoenix, which ends, of course, with one of the greatest comic stories ever told.

That was when I realized that comics could be a well crafted story with wonderful subplots that kept you coming back. Ed Brubaker, Geoff Johns, and Brian Bendis all write in that same way.
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Postby Zenguru » Sat Jul 05, 2008 10:59 am

I don't know if a single comic changed things for me. But as a whole, I would say Norm Breyfogle's run on Detective comics. Breyfogle gave Batman a spooky perspective that I'd never seen before in comics. I think his Batman paved the way for more animated styles like Timm and Cooke. Breyfogle's Detective and Batman runs made a huge impression on me.

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Postby thefourthman » Sat Jul 05, 2008 11:16 am

Zenguru wrote:I don't know if a single comic changed things for me. But as a whole, I would say Norm Breyfogle's run on Detective comics. Breyfogle gave Batman a spooky perspective that I'd never seen before in comics. I think his Batman paved the way for more animated styles like Timm and Cooke. Breyfogle's Detective and Batman runs made a huge impression on me.

for clarity's sake... it can be a single comic, graphic novel or a run on a book. I think I mentioned nothing but limited series or shorter lived on goings in my op, so what ever story or stories had the biggest impact on you is what I am looking for.

When did Breyfogle take over? I wonder if he was the guy who got the book back on track after it began to mimic the television show.

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Postby Zenguru » Sat Jul 05, 2008 7:18 pm

thefourthman wrote:for clarity's sake... it can be a single comic, graphic novel or a run on a book. I think I mentioned nothing but limited series or shorter lived on goings in my op, so what ever story or stories had the biggest impact on you is what I am looking for.

When did Breyfogle take over? I wonder if he was the guy who got the book back on track after it began to mimic the television show.

Breyfogle's first issue on Detective Comics was #579. A thrilling tale involving the Crime Doctor. His first regular issue was #582 with Jo Duffy. With #583, he was joined by British writers Alan Grant and John Wagner. Kicking off a spectacular run that introduced such characters as Ventriloquist and Scarface, Ratcatcher, Corrosive Man, Kadaver, Cornelius Stirk, and Joe Potato.

Breyfogle then took a break for a few issues while the 600th issue celebration coincided with Tim Burton's Batman movie in 1989. (#'s 598 thru 600 were written by the screenwriter Sam Hamm)

Then with #601, Breyfogle and Grant did another string through #621. Also a chapter in #627, Batman's 600th appearance in Detective Comics.

Then Breyfogle and Grant moved over to Batman with #455. And except for issues 467 thru 469, drawn by Tom Lyle, went uninterrupted until #476. A couple crossovers bumped in towards the end of that run. But as a whole, Breyfogle's entire span is one of my definitive takes on the character. In my mind, only Jim Aparo is more closely associated with Batman in terms of getting him.

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Postby Eli Katz » Sat Jul 05, 2008 10:14 pm

Zenguru wrote:In my mind, only Jim Aparo is more closely associated with Batman in terms of getting him.


Aparo is the definitive Batman artist. It's a damn shame he's no longer with us. I would've loved to have seen his version of Batman RIP.

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Postby zombiemichaeljackson » Sun Jul 06, 2008 12:39 am

Zenguru wrote:Breyfogle's first issue on Detective Comics was #579. A thrilling tale involving the Crime Doctor. His first regular issue was #582 with Jo Duffy. With #583, he was joined by British writers Alan Grant and John Wagner. Kicking off a spectacular run that introduced such characters as Ventriloquist and Scarface, Ratcatcher, Corrosive Man, Kadaver, Cornelius Stirk, and Joe Potato.

Breyfogle then took a break for a few issues while the 600th issue celebration coincided with Tim Burton's Batman movie in 1989. (#'s 598 thru 600 were written by the screenwriter Sam Hamm)

Then with #601, Breyfogle and Grant did another string through #621. Also a chapter in #627, Batman's 600th appearance in Detective Comics.

Then Breyfogle and Grant moved over to Batman with #455. And except for issues 467 thru 469, drawn by Tom Lyle, went uninterrupted until #476. A couple crossovers bumped in towards the end of that run. But as a whole, Breyfogle's entire span is one of my definitive takes on the character. In my mind, only Jim Aparo is more closely associated with Batman in terms of getting him.


Alan Grant's Shadow of the Bat was really good, too. Honestly, I think the Nolan directed Batman films echo the feel of that series more than anything, although I don't think it was intentional. I think they just had a very similar concept of Batman as a street level character.

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Postby Zenguru » Sun Jul 06, 2008 3:19 pm

twoheads wrote:Alan Grant's Shadow of the Bat was really good, too. Honestly, I think the Nolan directed Batman films echo the feel of that series more than anything, although I don't think it was intentional. I think they just had a very similar concept of Batman as a street level character.
I forgot about Shadow of the Bat. Grant & Breyfogle did great work there, too. I wish Breyfogle had stayed on there longer, though.

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