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Call for Reviews: S.H.I.E.L.D. #2

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******

Postby ****** » Mon Jun 14, 2010 4:49 pm

S.H.I.E.L.D. #2

There's a reason we haven't done a lot of mid-arc issues over the years. First issues provide the setup, final issues provide the climax, second issues provide the exposition. Not that there's anything wrong with exposition, it has to happen after all, it's just not always the most exciting part of the story. I still had a lot of fun reading this though, S.H.I.E.L.D. is still Hickman being Hickman. I could have done with another page or five of the text block, but it's Marvel and Marvel's audience is never going to embrace Hickman's creator owned style of storytelling so I guess I'll take what I can get. This issue I think worked best in the scenes with Leonid and Da Vinci, but the rest wasn't much of a step down. I'm very much looking forward to this being collected and getting a chance to read the full story instead of the single issue installments.

On art, Weaver and Strain continue their strong collaboration. I like that they're continuing to try new things and hope that they will continue to evolve as the series progresses.

Story: 10
Art: 9
Overall: 9.5
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Zero

Zombie Guard

Postby Zero » Mon Jun 14, 2010 4:50 pm

I think both issues were astonishingly good comics, although I can see why people used to having everything spelled out don't like it. It's nothing like regular comics and probably the weirdest Marvel book since Omega.
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MrBlack

WTF is this rank?

Postby MrBlack » Mon Jun 14, 2010 5:02 pm

Eli Katz wrote:I think it's cool that Marvel is taking real storytelling risks. I hope it takes more of them. I just don't think this project works.

Maybe, as the story unfolds, the elements that I found problematic will end up making a lot more sense than they do now.

Let me know. I suspect this book will read much better collected.

I think this issue is suffering from middle child syndrome. It's dense enough that you can't just drop in without reading the first issue, and it's setting stuff up that probably won't make sense until the end of the story arc. Thus, the issue in isolation is just buzzwords and exposition without much plot or action (aside from the sweet fight between the Dark Man and the elder Stark and Richards).

I really liked the first issue, but this one didn't give me enough to grab onto. Leonardo's dialogue certainly sounded cool, but we don't have enough information at this stage to make sense of it. I did like the page of nothing but dialogue; the characters were in the dark so it made sense to do it that way rather than illustrating a page of dimly lit or unlit panels with word balloons. It also drew your attention to what was being said, rather than what was being shown.

While I certainly enjoyed the production of the issue, I cannot say whether I actually enjoyed reading it as a single issue comic book. It's almost impossible to judge something like this in isolation. I guess I will have to take that into account when I score the book. Right now I see a ton of potential, but we have all seen how quickly that can turn to disaster (I'm looking at you Matrix trilogy!).
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Eli Katz

OMCTO

Postby Eli Katz » Mon Jun 14, 2010 6:18 pm

Zero wrote:I think both issues were astonishingly good comics, although I can see why people used to having everything spelled out don't like it. It's nothing like regular comics and probably the weirdest Marvel book since Omega.

Yeah, it's nothing like regular superhero comics. But it has many similarities with post modern novels. The dialogue page is right out of William S. Burroughs, who used this technique 50 years ago to disrupt his novels.

I don't think it's an especially effective storytelling device. It draws attention to itself and diminishes the overall story.

But I'd love to see why some of you guys think the dialogue page is so effective.
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guitarsmashley

Regular-Sized Poster

Postby guitarsmashley » Mon Jun 14, 2010 6:43 pm

Zero wrote:I think both issues were astonishingly good comics, although I can see why people used to having everything spelled out don't like it. It's nothing like regular comics and probably the weirdest Marvel book since Omega.


It has nothing to do with being spelled out don't even try to play the "You have to be an idiot not to understand this comic" card. There was non linear story telling with lots of information and no exposition. Characters have been introduced with no reason or rhyme. I have a feeling this will read much better in trade and if it doesn't then it's a piece of shit.
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Garofani Spruzzo

Rain Partier

Postby Garofani Spruzzo » Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:28 pm

Hopefully I'll be back online for more than a few minutes tomorrow night, or Wednesday and will review SHIELD #2 as soon as possible.
User avatar

Porcelain38

dINGO

Postby Porcelain38 » Mon Jun 14, 2010 8:30 pm

Quick Review:

This series is perfect. The way Hickman is slowly revealing the history of the Marvel U is something to behold. The single page of only text dialogue was great and amazing to see in a Marvel book of all places. The art is fantastic as always.

This book gets a 10.

******

Postby ****** » Tue Jun 15, 2010 8:46 am

Image

http://www.theouthousers.com/content/view/8672/176/
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Garofani Spruzzo

Rain Partier

Postby Garofani Spruzzo » Tue Jun 15, 2010 9:35 am

Also, where have all the British people gone with their oily selves?

******

Postby ****** » Tue Jun 15, 2010 9:50 am

Spicy Dick wrote:Also, where have all the British people gone with their oily selves?


Robert Green induced national state of mourning, IMO.
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Garofani Spruzzo

Rain Partier

Postby Garofani Spruzzo » Tue Jun 15, 2010 10:01 am

amlah6 wrote:Robert Green induced national state of mourning, IMO.


Well, how am I supposed to cast my re-make of The Young Ones with actual British people and guest appearances by Alexei Sayle, Dexy's Midnight Runners, and Ken Bishop's Nice Twelve??
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Amoebas

Son of Stein

Postby Amoebas » Tue Jun 15, 2010 10:09 am

Spicy Dick wrote:Also, where have all the British people gone with their oily selves?


http://www.theouthousers.com/forum/view ... 22#1872722
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thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Tue Jun 15, 2010 10:57 am

Eli Katz wrote:Yeah, it's nothing like regular superhero comics. But it has many similarities with post modern novels. The dialogue page is right out of William S. Burroughs, who used this technique 50 years ago to disrupt his novels.

I don't think it's an especially effective storytelling device. It draws attention to itself and diminishes the overall story.

But I'd love to see why some of you guys think the dialogue page is so effective.

I don't think he employs it that way though.

Certainly it was Burroughs did, and with him it also added to the keep you guessing style of his storytelling. You are right though, used in that manner it is ineffective.

This was not Hickman's best use of it. This could have easily been a black panel with the words back and forth in balloons. Only problem then is who is saying what?

In Pax Romana, it was its most effective. Seriously, those pages would have been entire issues by themselves of committee meetings that would have been near impossible to read in balloons.

Here, it does both. It is a break from the story in a certain manner, but given the way Weaver is playing with design (again I think Hickman is heavily influencing the layout and the design of the Celestial beings below Rome - this may even be part of what people are noting in the difference in the art for those sequences - although I suspect the cold static feeling of those panels is supposed to give you an otherworldly feel for the guys with the crazy hats).. it almost fits. Almost. This is certainly the one time he has employed the technique where it would not have been an overly drawn out sequence in standard comic narrative. From a purely postmodern stance though, it works as it calls attention to the words. There are as important if not more important in this book than a standard Marvel book.
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Eli Katz

OMCTO

Postby Eli Katz » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:54 am

thefourthman wrote:I don't think he employs it that way though.

Certainly it was Burroughs did, and with him it also added to the keep you guessing style of his storytelling. You are right though, used in that manner it is ineffective.

This was not Hickman's best use of it. This could have easily been a black panel with the words back and forth in balloons. Only problem then is who is saying what?

In Pax Romana, it was its most effective. Seriously, those pages would have been entire issues by themselves of committee meetings that would have been near impossible to read in balloons.

Here, it does both. It is a break from the story in a certain manner, but given the way Weaver is playing with design (again I think Hickman is heavily influencing the layout and the design of the Celestial beings below Rome - this may even be part of what people are noting in the difference in the art for those sequences - although I suspect the cold static feeling of those panels is supposed to give you an otherworldly feel for the guys with the crazy hats).. it almost fits. Almost. This is certainly the one time he has employed the technique where it would not have been an overly drawn out sequence in standard comic narrative. From a purely postmodern stance though, it works as it calls attention to the words. There are as important if not more important in this book than a standard Marvel book.

Interesting. Thanks.
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Eli Katz

OMCTO

Postby Eli Katz » Tue Jun 15, 2010 1:06 pm

No Fourthy review? :(

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