Monday, June 27, 2016 • Morning Edition • "Trash eaters."

The Outhouse - The Greatest Comic Book Forum

Comics news, comic book reviews, feature articles about comics, interviews with comic creators, plus the greatest comic book and pop culture discussion in the Outhouse forums!

Advertisement

Review Group Week 233 - JUSTICE LEAGUE: GENERATION LOST #6

Hey you! Reader! Want to be a part of the GREATEST COMIC BOOK AND GEEK COMMUNITY on the web?! Well, they're not accepting new members, but we'll take anyone here, so why not sign up for a free acount? It's fast and it's easy, like your mom! Sign up today! Membership spots are limited!*

*Membership spots not really limited!

User avatar

Punchy

Staff Writer

Postby Punchy » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:25 pm

thefourthman wrote:wrong, I read volume 6 two weeks ago and stated my distaste for it in various threads. I like vol 2-5. I like half of volume 1 and detest vol 6.


But Volume 6 was so good!
User avatar

S.F. Jude Terror

OMCTO

Postby S.F. Jude Terror » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:27 pm

Punchy wrote:But Volume 6 was so good!


I agree. Fourthy can't stomach a happy ending because Emma has left a hole in his heart.
User avatar

Punchy

Staff Writer

Postby Punchy » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:28 pm

Jude Terror wrote:I agree. Fourthy can't stomach a happy ending because Emma has left a hole in his heart.


I bet he's annoyed about the Stephen Stills reveal! Bigot!
User avatar

thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:30 pm

Jude Terror wrote:I agree. Fourthy can't stomach a happy ending because Emma has left a hole in his heart.

i've said my piece. it's in the review spin off thread. that's all I really have to say about it. I felt like it talked down to its audience and forgot what was likeable about it in the first place.

In fact, everyone I have talked to (notice the word "talked", not "typed"), feels that it is easily the weakest entry in the series and about half of them feel the same way. I had one customer who said she couldn't be bothered to finish it.

******

Postby ****** » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:35 pm

thefourthman wrote:i've said my piece. it's in the review spin off thread. that's all I really have to say about it. I felt like it talked down to its audience and forgot what was likeable about it in the first place.

In fact, everyone I have talked to (notice the word "talked", not "typed"), feels that it is easily the weakest entry in the series and about half of them feel the same way. I had one customer who said she couldn't be bothered to finish it.


Are these the same customers you constantly make fun of and disparage on the web? :lol: :lol: :lol:
User avatar

Punchy

Staff Writer

Postby Punchy » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:35 pm

thefourthman wrote:i've said my piece. it's in the review spin off thread. that's all I really have to say about it. I felt like it talked down to its audience and forgot what was likeable about it in the first place.

In fact, everyone I have talked to (notice the word "talked", not "typed"), feels that it is easily the weakest entry in the series and about half of them feel the same way. I had one customer who said she couldn't be bothered to finish it.


How on earth did it talk down to it's audience? It anything it made things more complex and about more than just the fighting. I remain astonished at how well BLOM managed to tell a story about human emotions and relationships in amongst all the weirdness, and still managed to make it funny.

FOURTHMAN HAS LOST THE POWER OF LOVE

MINUS 500 EXP.

******

Postby ****** » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:36 pm

Punchy wrote:FOURTHMAN HAS LOST THE POWER OF LOVE

MINUS 500 EXP.


Image
User avatar

thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:51 pm

John Snow wrote:Are these the same customers you constantly make fun of and disparage on the web? :lol: :lol: :lol:

no, many of these are people I routinely take recommendations from. I love 90% of our client base, but at the same time that 90% is boring. Except for Wally, he brings me Beer, he rules.
User avatar

thefourthman

Outhouse Editor

Postby thefourthman » Wed Jul 28, 2010 3:58 pm

Punchy wrote:How on earth did it talk down to it's audience? It anything it made things more complex and about more than just the fighting. I remain astonished at how well BLOM managed to tell a story about human emotions and relationships in amongst all the weirdness, and still managed to make it funny.

FOURTHMAN HAS LOST THE POWER OF LOVE

MINUS 500 EXP.

to each their own. read my review in your thread.
User avatar

Amoebas

Son of Stein

Postby Amoebas » Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:07 pm

A little disappointed in my pick. A fill-in artist and a side story :roll: . I was hoping for the all action and banter stuff that happened in 1-5.

Still a good issue that establishes a direction for the book (and the DCU). Review later.
User avatar

Eli Katz

OMCTO

Postby Eli Katz » Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:39 pm

I have to admit that I wasn't looking forward to JUSTICE LEAGUE: GENERATION LOST #6. After several weeks of reading terrible superhero books for the Review Group, I'd had just about enough of these overpriced, disposable stories. But, to my astonishment, GENRATION LOST #6 is not only a fun book and a worthwhile read, it is also a surprisingly intelligent time-travel story. Kudos to Judd Winick. He’s written a very good issue and has sparked my interest in a series that I’d previously dismissed.

Initially, the story for this issue appears to be rather straightforward and conventional. Captain Atom absorbs the full blast from a "special" nuclear device and then rushes into space where he can release the energy safely. He's blasted back to Earth in the process, and somehow ends up in the nineteenth century. Two farm kids, barefoot and dressed in Amish-like clothing, find him knocked out and lying on the edge of a forest. At first, they mistake him for a "big doll," but they run in terror when he wakes up from the explosion. Afraid that he could disturb "the world -- the universe -- reality" if he remains too long in the past, Captain Atom tries to return to his proper time and place. But somehow, as a consequence of absorbing the blast, he has lost his powers for the next nineteen hours or so. Stranded, he pretends to be a circus freak and tries to do as little as possible to interfere with the course of history.

Now, while the first half of the book reads like a forgettable superhero story, the second half is filled with several major surprises. First, Winick plays a clever little trick on both Captain Atom and the reader and, in turn, pushes the story in a completely new and unexpected direction. I won't spoil the main plot twist here because I want to encourage everyone, even people who know nothing about this series, to check out GENERATION LOST. But let's just say that Winick manipulates the tired conventions of the time-travel subgenre and very expertly upends the reader's -- or at least my -- expectations. Second, Winick follows this plot twist with a very surprising guest appearance. And by surprising, I don't mean simply unannounced. Again, I won't say more for fear of spoiling a really good book. Just trust me that it’s a disturbing surprise.

Third, and perhaps most important, Winick fills his story with unusual and at times surreal images. This is a story that demands cool, imaginative artwork. Winick is not simply writing an entertaining comic, but a visually engaging one. He shows here that he really understands that superhero stories are more than just a bunch of fight scenes, interrupted by the occasional sequence of talking heads -- that they are, rather, an opportunity to borrow imagery from sci fi, horror, and fantasy and to combine them wildly in a single page. If I were an artist at DC, I would be clamoring to illustrate this book. It would be a hell of a lot of fun.

And the art team for this book, headed by Keith Giffen, does a good job of realizing Winick's vision. Giffen and company are able to capture the mood of the story as it changes from superhero tale to nightmarish vision. They add all the right details to make Winick's plot twists and deceptions more surprising and believable. Giffen and his team aren't flashy artists, but they are damn good storytellers. And I just love the way they draw the guest star.

Overall, this is what superhero books are supposed to be: fun, fast, and unpredictable. Winick deserves high praise for this issue and this series. If you aren't reading GENERATION LOST, then you're definitely -- ahem -- losing out.


STORY: 8.5
ART: 7.5
OVERALL: 8
User avatar

S.F. Jude Terror

OMCTO

Postby S.F. Jude Terror » Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:45 pm

Eli Katz wrote:I have to admit that I wasn’t looking forward to JUSTICE LEAGUE: GENERATION LOST #6. After several weeks of reading terrible superhero books for the Review Group, I’d had just about enough of these overpriced, disposable stories. But, to my astonishment, GENRATION LOST #6 is not only a fun book and a worthwhile read, it is also a surprisingly intelligent time-travel story. Kudos to Judd Winick. He’s written a very good issue and has sparked my interest in a series that I’d previously dismissed.

Initially, the story for this issue appears to be rather straightforward and conventional. Captain Atom absorbs the full blast from a “special” nuclear device and then rushes into space where he can release the energy safely. He’s blasted back to Earth in the process, but back to the nineteenth century. Two farm kids, barefoot and dressed in Amish-like clothing, find him knocked out and sprawled in an open field. At first, they mistake him for a “big doll,” but they run in terror when he wakes up from the explosion. Afraid that he could disturb “the world -- the universe -- reality” if he remains too long in the past, Captain Atom tries to return to his proper time and place. But somehow, as a consequence of absorbing the blast, he has lost his powers for the next nineteen hours or so. Stranded, he pretends to be a circus freak and tries to do as little as possible to interfere with the course of history.

Now, while the first half of the book reads like a forgettable superhero story, the second half is filled with several major surprises. First, Winick plays a clever little trick on both Captain Atom and the reader and, in turn, pushes the story in a completely new and unexpected direction. I won’t spoil the main plot twist here because I want to encourage everyone, even people who know nothing about this series, to check out GENERATION LOST. But let’s just say that Winick manipulates the tired conventions of the time-travel subgenre and very expertly upends the reader’s -- or at least my -- expectations. Second, Winick follows this plot twist with a very surprising guest appearance. And by surprising, I don’t mean simply unannounced. Again, I won’t say more for fear of spoiling a really good book. Just trust me that it’s a disturbing surprise.

Third, and perhaps most important, Winick fills his story with unusual and at times surreal images. This is a story that demands cool, imaginative artwork. Winick is not simply writing an entertaining comic, but a visually engaging one. He shows here that he really understands that superhero stories are more than just a bunch of fight scenes, interrupted by the occasional sequence of talking heads -- that they are, rather, an opportunity to borrow imagery from sci fi, horror, and fantasy and to combine them wildly in a single page. If I were an artist at DC, I would be clamoring to illustrate this book. It would be a hell of a lot of fun.

And the art team for this book, headed by Keith Giffen, does a good job of realizing Winick’s vision. Giffen and company are able to capture the mood of the story as it changes from superhero tale to nightmarish vision. They add all the right details to make Winick’s plot twists and deceptions more surprising and believable. Giffen and his team aren’t flashy artists, but they are damn good storytellers. And I just love the way they draw the guest star.

Overall, this is what superhero books are supposed to be: fun, fast, and unpredictable. Winick deserves high praise for this issue and this series. If you aren’t reading GENERATION LOST, then you’re definitely -- ahem -- losing out.


STORY: 8.5
ART: 7.5
OVRALL: 8


Jude Terror: Vindicated.
User avatar

Eli Katz

OMCTO

Postby Eli Katz » Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:53 pm

Jude Terror wrote:Jude Terror: Vindicated.

:lol:
Never.
User avatar

S.F. Jude Terror

OMCTO

Postby S.F. Jude Terror » Wed Jul 28, 2010 4:58 pm

Eli Katz wrote::lol:
Never.


:x What I said about this comic was correct!
User avatar

Eli Katz

OMCTO

Postby Eli Katz » Wed Jul 28, 2010 5:02 pm

Jude Terror wrote::x What I said about this comic was correct!

That's true. I just can't bear to agree with you. :P

leave a comment with facebook


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: dregj and 36 guests