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Ignored Independents - Nat Turner, Volume 2

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LOLtron

Rain Partier

Postby LOLtron » Wed Mar 07, 2007 11:08 am

Nat Turner Vol.2 (Issues 3-4)‘Written’ and illustrated by Kyle BakerImage Comics, 2007I’d been waiting for Nat Turner’s conclusion for some time now. Hell, after almost 2 years, it was supposed to come out last month. Anyway, a friend here at The Outhouse once said that he did not approve of Nat Turner, and seeing from [...]
ImageNat Turner Vol.2 (Issues 3-4)
‘Written’ and illustrated by Kyle Baker
Image Comics, 2007

I’d been waiting for Nat Turner’s conclusion for some time now. Hell, after almost 2 years, it was supposed to come out last month. Anyway, a friend here at The Outhouse once said that he did not approve of Nat Turner, and seeing from this account of his confession, I, too, don’t believe I find empathy for this man long past. I could go into a long discussion about moral relativism and my thoughts on such a Machiavellian event in history, but I’ll refrain. This is all I’ll say to the actual story contents.

What I can laud is Baker’s art and story direction. He let’s Turner’s own words and delusions of grandeur pour out onto the page, and accompanies those words with the most vivid art. Where there are gaps, such as the events after his confession in prison, Baker’s art more than adequately tells the story in great detail. Like Moore’s From Hell, this story does a fantastic job of recounting horrific historical events in vivid detail, enough that it gets to the reader’s very nerves.

Do I recommend the book? I can’t say. One part of me says to read it, and be exposed to this oft-forgotten event in antebellum American history. It is, in my opinion, a great contribution to the medium, injecting a rather new method of storytelling. Another says to stay away from it, because Nat Turner employed methods of retribution that were most deplorable. I’ll let you decide.

What I’ll not know for the time being, or ever, is why Baker chose such a figure to memorialize in graphic literature.

Requests for an interview went unanswered at the time of the review, but have since been granted.

Post your thoughts here.

Posted originally: 2007-03-07 15:08:26

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