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Pedi's 3D Animation and Visual Effects Art:

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User avatar

AntiLogic

Factor 8

Postby AntiLogic » Tue Apr 22, 2008 2:19 am

This'll be my thread to separate my traditional and digital arts.

Here's a character I modeled in 3d and shaded to look like a cartoon, for a recent project:

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I'll post a bunch of my other 3d works here as well. :)
User avatar

AntiLogic

Factor 8

Postby AntiLogic » Tue Apr 22, 2008 3:15 am

Here's some slide-show images of different projects I've done over the years:
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User avatar

S.F. Jude Terror

OMCTO

Postby S.F. Jude Terror » Tue Apr 22, 2008 4:09 am

That stuff is incredible. Just wow.
User avatar

Doc Jon

Rain Partier

Postby Doc Jon » Tue Apr 22, 2008 10:57 am

So that's what you've been doing instead of drawing funny books!

I love the hot dog. That made me laugh.
User avatar

prozacman

Expert Post Whore

Postby prozacman » Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:05 am

Good work on Starship Troupers! I wish they could have continued the show.
User avatar

AntiLogic

Factor 8

Postby AntiLogic » Tue Apr 22, 2008 8:50 pm

Hey, thanks a lot guys... yeah, 3d animation and all that has been a large part of my past 13 years... that and traditional stuff like boards, character designs and what not. ;)
User avatar

AntiLogic

Factor 8

Postby AntiLogic » Tue Apr 29, 2008 5:28 pm

Greg wrote:OMG, Ped!! That first monster pic scared the living hell outta me!!! :-[


Heh... :) That image was from the Boogeyman movie I did the 3d animation and vfx on 25 some shots -- all the main Boogeyman shots. I designed the character in 3d, did all the modeling, textures, rigging, binding, animation, lighting, rendering and compositing for the shots... you can check out more on that project at http://www.3dcreaturez.com

blagblag

Designer Interactive

Postby blagblag » Tue Apr 29, 2008 6:18 pm

wow that 3D stuff is awesome. I always wanted to learn how to do some of it myself but always felt like it would take so long to learn enough to be good at it that it would take too much time away from the other stuff I like learning, like traditional comic art, writing, guitar, etc...

Without delving into actual dollars and cents (unless you want to) does doing 3D projects like this pay off pretty well financially? I would imagine it's way more than a person could make doing comic books, unless you were an absolute superstar. I hope that's not prying too much, I'm just curious.
User avatar

AntiLogic

Factor 8

Postby AntiLogic » Tue Apr 29, 2008 6:35 pm

dick buff wrote:wow that 3D stuff is awesome. I always wanted to learn how to do some of it myself but always felt like it would take so long to learn enough to be good at it that it would take too much time away from the other stuff I like learning, like traditional comic art, writing, guitar, etc...

Without delving into actual dollars and cents (unless you want to) does doing 3D projects like this pay off pretty well financially? I would imagine it's way more than a person could make doing comic books, unless you were an absolute superstar. I hope that's not prying too much, I'm just curious.


Well... I don't only do 3d for films throughout the year... I'm generally all over the board, juggling several projects in film, tv, commercials, games, comics, etc, at a time... but, I imagine if an average person doing comics brings in about $30-60K / yr (correct me if I'm wrong)... if you're an experienced and skilled 3d/2d self-employed generalist -- and specializing in certain areas like I do as well -- then you will earn far more than the average comic artist... a low 6 figure income is not uncommon. Owning an indi small biz allows me to call the shots, prices, stay competitive against bigger studios and choose what projects I wish to take. I'm constantly turning down gigs, due to overload on my plate. And being part of several interconnected industries allows me to stay busy, no matter how the specific industry is doing -- if there's dry times in one biz, I just hop over to the next biz... it keeps my options open, and allows for a steady growth.

Answer your question?

blagblag

Designer Interactive

Postby blagblag » Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:17 pm

yup, great answer. When did you get into this sort of non-comics stuff? Like, at the time you were working at Extreme Studios, had you already started learning these skills? And are you entirely self taught? I do web design right now, but I think it'd be neat to eventually get into more "entertainment" related fields down the road, while at the same time working independently like you. It's real easy to find out info about breaking into comics. I mean basically you just get real good at sequential storytelling and then submit stuff to the various companies. But I would have no idea where to even start to break into some of the industries you work in.
User avatar

AntiLogic

Factor 8

Postby AntiLogic » Tue Apr 29, 2008 7:42 pm

dick buff wrote:yup, great answer. When did you get into this sort of non-comics stuff? Like, at the time you were working at Extreme Studios, had you already started learning these skills? And are you entirely self taught? I do web design right now, but I think it'd be neat to eventually get into more "entertainment" related fields down the road, while at the same time working independently like you. It's real easy to find out info about breaking into comics. I mean basically you just get real good at sequential storytelling and then submit stuff to the various companies. But I would have no idea where to even start to break into some of the industries you work in.


A few months after doing my last work in comics, for Marvel, when I was 19, I purchased a Silicon Graphics O2 with Alias/Wavefront Power Animator -- a combo package I paid $17500 for back then, and now is worth didly... At the time, this graphic system and software was the top of the line, used by ILM and others for features including Independence Day, Jurassic Park, among many others... Power Animator was the predecessor to Maya... Within the first month of owning the system, I taught myself the fundamentals of 3d nurbs modeling, and modeled my first head. It helped a whole lot, knowing the art of illustration as a boost in understanding 3d...

Since then, every one of my skills (I'll paste a fairly all-inclusive list below) I have 100% self-taught... every single individual discipline I learned, from illustration and storytelling, to modeling, graphic design, etc, has been a huge learning block for learning new tricks... each trick takes less time to learn... and now, I learn new complex software at literally a fraction of the time it takes someone to go learn it at a school or college, or Gnomon, for instance... and I save on the many thousands of dollars it costs to be educated at these facilities... and I use that money by reinvesting into my own biz, buying more machines, more software, more power...

I first taught myself 3d on Power Animator and O2... then, I got about $40K in work doing some 3d toy animations for Applause Toys, for the Star Wars toys given out at KFC and Taco Bell... with that money, I bought a Power Mac and started learning photoshop and other programs... with that, I landed one of my first projects on staff, working on the Roughneck Chronicles, Starship Troopers Animated Series, where I was responsible for the majority of the Insect textures and shaders, and modeling a bunch of insects too... from there, I just built my reel and portfolio and started building websites for myself, then offered those as services, etc, etc, etc.... till, I gained all the skills I have now, and continue to learn, at a fast pace.

If you're interested in starting out in the biz, and have a few skills to offer, you can always find gigs on Craigslist.org, Designinmotion.com, AWN.com, Highend3d.com, Creativeheads.com, and several other sites on the net... and as you build your reel and skills and portfolio, you can ask for higher rates, and start calling your own shots, while working at home, in your underwear and cowboy hat, like I do ;) :D

Pedi

TRADITIONAL & DIGITAL MULTIMEDIA & INTERACTIVE ANIMATION & DESIGN -- ARTIST

SKILLS

Traditional Skills:
• Illustration & Painting: Stylized, Cartoony, Photo-Realistic, Fantasy, Science Fiction
• Classical Painting: Oils, Acrylics, Watercolors
• Conceptual Illustration: Characters, Creatures, Costumes, Backgrounds, Buildings, Landscapes, Vehicles
• Storyboard Illustration: For every occasion
• Comic books / Graphic Novels: Penciling, Inking, Coloring, Painting

Digital Skills:
• 3D Production: Character Modeling, Character Animation, Texture Mapping, Binding & Rigging, Props & Sets, Lighting, Rendering
• VFX & Live Action Integration: Roto-Scoping, Wire Removal, Green Screen Removal, 2D/3D Compositing, 2D/3D/ Motion Tracking, 2D/3D Visual Effects, 2D/3D Particles, Digital Matte Painting
• Video Production: 2D/3D Motion Graphics, Video Editing, Audio Editing
• Multimedia & Interactive: Graphic Design, Web Design & Development, Flash Animated Banners, 2D/3D Interactive Gaming Design & Development, (basic) Programming & Scripting

Software & Technology:
• AutoDesk: Maya, Combustion
• Newtek: Lightwave
• Pixologic: Zbrush
• Adobe: After Effects, Photoshop, Illustrator, Image Ready, Streamline, Acrobat
• Meta Creations: Poser
• Right Hemisphere: Deep Paint 3d
• Macromedia: Flash, Dreamweaver, Fireworks
• Sony: DVD Architect
• Sonic Foundry: Sound Forge
• Cakewalk: Home Studio
• Os: Windows / Macintosh
• Among Many Others

blagblag

Designer Interactive

Postby blagblag » Wed Apr 30, 2008 6:31 pm

wow man, i dont see how you ever had time to do anything outside of your studio/office with all that knowledge and experience you've racked up. If I'm ever on your side of the country can I come hang out with you for a day?

Question. I'm about to buy a new computer for my business but I'd like to get one with enough horsepower to run some of those 3D programs and start messing around with that. But I'd also like to stick with a windows environment. Could you recommend what sort of hardware I'd need for this and maybe what price range I'd be looking at? Even though I'm a computer programmer, it's been several years since I actually bought a computer and I'm not up to date on hardware.

I was specifically thinking of one of these, preferably the cheaper one, but that may just be wishful thinking on my part:
http://www.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx/xpsdt_420?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs

Hopefully I'm not derailing your thread too much here.
User avatar

AntiLogic

Factor 8

Postby AntiLogic » Wed Apr 30, 2008 7:05 pm

"wow man, i dont see how you ever had time to do anything outside of your studio/office with all that knowledge and experience you've racked up."

p> heh... well that's just it... I really don't leave the studio/computer :)

"If I'm ever on your side of the country can I come hang out with you for a day?"

p> Sure, I don't see why not... but call me a few days in advance to see how my schedule is. My cell number is on my site.

"Question. I'm about to buy a new computer for my business but I'd like to get one with enough horsepower to run some of those 3D programs and start messing around with that. But I'd also like to stick with a windows environment. Could you recommend what sort of hardware I'd need for this and maybe what price range I'd be looking at? Even though I'm a computer programmer, it's been several years since I actually bought a computer and I'm not up to date on hardware."

p> For about $2k, you can get a reasonable Win XP Pro Intel dual core with 2-4 gigs of ram... a 512-768 mb nvidia graphics card... and about 160 gigs of HD... for additional $200 you can get a nice 20" flat screen monitor... if you go to PC Club, they have good prices and good products... and I'd stick with the basic setup that I mentioned here.

"Hopefully I'm not derailing your thread too much here."

p> too late! :) just kidding... it's only a thread, so ask any questions you got.
User avatar

S.F. Jude Terror

OMCTO

Postby S.F. Jude Terror » Sat May 17, 2008 1:02 am

pedi wrote:
dick buff wrote:yup, great answer. When did you get into this sort of non-comics stuff? Like, at the time you were working at Extreme Studios, had you already started learning these skills? And are you entirely self taught? I do web design right now, but I think it'd be neat to eventually get into more "entertainment" related fields down the road, while at the same time working independently like you. It's real easy to find out info about breaking into comics. I mean basically you just get real good at sequential storytelling and then submit stuff to the various companies. But I would have no idea where to even start to break into some of the industries you work in.


A few months after doing my last work in comics, for Marvel, when I was 19, I purchased a Silicon Graphics O2 with Alias/Wavefront Power Animator -- a combo package I paid $17500 for back then, and now is worth didly... At the time, this graphic system and software was the top of the line, used by ILM and others for features including Independence Day, Jurassic Park, among many others... Power Animator was the predecessor to Maya... Within the first month of owning the system, I taught myself the fundamentals of 3d nurbs modeling, and modeled my first head. It helped a whole lot, knowing the art of illustration as a boost in understanding 3d...

Since then, every one of my skills (I'll paste a fairly all-inclusive list below) I have 100% self-taught... every single individual discipline I learned, from illustration and storytelling, to modeling, graphic design, etc, has been a huge learning block for learning new tricks... each trick takes less time to learn... and now, I learn new complex software at literally a fraction of the time it takes someone to go learn it at a school or college, or Gnomon, for instance... and I save on the many thousands of dollars it costs to be educated at these facilities... and I use that money by reinvesting into my own biz, buying more machines, more software, more power...

I first taught myself 3d on Power Animator and O2... then, I got about $40K in work doing some 3d toy animations for Applause Toys, for the Star Wars toys given out at KFC and Taco Bell... with that money, I bought a Power Mac and started learning photoshop and other programs... with that, I landed one of my first projects on staff, working on the Roughneck Chronicles, Starship Troopers Animated Series, where I was responsible for the majority of the Insect textures and shaders, and modeling a bunch of insects too... from there, I just built my reel and portfolio and started building websites for myself, then offered those as services, etc, etc, etc.... till, I gained all the skills I have now, and continue to learn, at a fast pace.

If you're interested in starting out in the biz, and have a few skills to offer, you can always find gigs on Craigslist.org, Designinmotion.com, AWN.com, Highend3d.com, Creativeheads.com, and several other sites on the net... and as you build your reel and skills and portfolio, you can ask for higher rates, and start calling your own shots, while working at home, in your underwear and cowboy hat, like I do ;) :D

Pedi

TRADITIONAL & DIGITAL MULTIMEDIA & INTERACTIVE ANIMATION & DESIGN -- ARTIST

SKILLS

Traditional Skills:
• Illustration & Painting: Stylized, Cartoony, Photo-Realistic, Fantasy, Science Fiction
• Classical Painting: Oils, Acrylics, Watercolors
• Conceptual Illustration: Characters, Creatures, Costumes, Backgrounds, Buildings, Landscapes, Vehicles
• Storyboard Illustration: For every occasion
• Comic books / Graphic Novels: Penciling, Inking, Coloring, Painting

Digital Skills:
• 3D Production: Character Modeling, Character Animation, Texture Mapping, Binding & Rigging, Props & Sets, Lighting, Rendering
• VFX & Live Action Integration: Roto-Scoping, Wire Removal, Green Screen Removal, 2D/3D Compositing, 2D/3D/ Motion Tracking, 2D/3D Visual Effects, 2D/3D Particles, Digital Matte Painting
• Video Production: 2D/3D Motion Graphics, Video Editing, Audio Editing
• Multimedia & Interactive: Graphic Design, Web Design & Development, Flash Animated Banners, 2D/3D Interactive Gaming Design & Development, (basic) Programming & Scripting

Software & Technology:
• AutoDesk: Maya, Combustion
• Newtek: Lightwave
• Pixologic: Zbrush
• Adobe: After Effects, Photoshop, Illustrator, Image Ready, Streamline, Acrobat
• Meta Creations: Poser
• Right Hemisphere: Deep Paint 3d
• Macromedia: Flash, Dreamweaver, Fireworks
• Sony: DVD Architect
• Sonic Foundry: Sound Forge
• Cakewalk: Home Studio
• Os: Windows / Macintosh
• Among Many Others


What I learned from this is that Pedi dresses like a combination of Shawn Michaels and GG Allin while he works from home. :P

Honestly, that's an inspiring story. You've done pretty well for yourself.

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