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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Wed Dec 11, 2013 6:42 pm

habitual wrote:M'Kraan Crystal?

Hab

Maybe
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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Wed Dec 11, 2013 7:50 pm

haha


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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:13 pm

Physicists Find a Link between Wormholes and Spooky Action at a Distance

Wormholes and entanglement—two of science fiction's favorite concepts from modern physics—may in reality be two sides of the same coin, physicists say. The findings may offer a way to solve puzzling mysteries about black holes and perhaps help reconcile theories of gravity and quantum physics, which has been the dream of physicists since the mid–20th century.

Wormholes are hypothetical shortcuts through spacetime, also known as Einstein–Rosen bridges, after Albert Einstein and Nathan Rosen, who predicted them in 1935. Entanglement is another way of connecting two distant objects: When two particles are entangled, they retain a connection even when separated over great distances, so that actions performed on one affect the other. Entanglement has been demonstrated in quantum physics experiments with particles, but wormholes, which arise from general relativity, are purely theoretical. The two phenomena were long thought to be unrelated.

Then physicists Leonard Susskind of Stanford University and Juan Maldacena of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. began to think about entangling two black holes to one another. Entanglement is generally thought to occur between tiny particles, not giant cosmic objects. But if two black holes were entangled, and then separated from one another, the result, the physicists reasoned, would be a wormhole connecting them. Susskind and Maldacena postulated such a link between wormholes and entanglement earlier this year.

Two independent teams have since found support for the idea. They show theoretically that entangled quarks are indeed connected by a wormhole within a stripped-down version of reality. In this model it's as if the wormhole exists in our real 4-D world (three dimensions of space and one of time), but the quarks are entangled only in a flattened 3-D simulacrum of reality. (This kind of modeling is akin to using a two-dimensional hologram to represent a 3-D object.) "What Maldacena and Susskind want to say is that literally whenever you have entanglement, you have wormholes," says Andreas Karch of the University of Washington, co-author of one of the two new papers.
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Lord Simian

The Lord of the Monkeys

Postby Lord Simian » Thu Dec 12, 2013 7:44 am

Theoretical physicist JUAN maldaCENA?

Dang!
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achilles

Fagorstorm

Postby achilles » Thu Dec 12, 2013 9:53 am

Lord Simian wrote:Theoretical physicist JUAN maldaCENA?

Dang!


Shows you where you can go in theoretical physics with just a little hustle, loyalty, and...what was that other, oh yeah, respect.
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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Thu Dec 12, 2013 3:04 pm

Hubble Space Telescope Sees Evidence of Water Vapor Venting off Jupiter Moon

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has observed water vapor above the frigid south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa, providing the first strong evidence of water plumes erupting off the moon's surface.

Previous scientific findings from other sources already point to the existence of an ocean located under Europa's icy crust. Researchers are not yet fully certain whether the detected water vapor is generated by erupting water plumes on the surface, but they are confident this is the most likely explanation.

Should further observations support the finding, this would make Europa the second moon in the solar system known to have water vapor plumes. The findings are being published in the Dec. 12 online issue of Science Express, and reported at the meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco.

“By far the simplest explanation for this water vapor is that it erupted from plumes on the surface of Europa,” said lead author Lorenz Roth of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "If those plumes are connected with the subsurface water ocean we are confident exists under Europa's crust, then this means that future investigations can directly investigate the chemical makeup of Europa's potentially habitable environment without drilling through layers of ice. And that is tremendously exciting."

In 2005, NASA’s Cassini orbiter detected jets of water vapor and dust spewing off the surface of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Although ice and dust particles have subsequently been found in the Enceladus plumes, only water vapor gases have been measured at Europa so far.
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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Mon Dec 16, 2013 3:40 pm

cool

Life’s Littlest Pleasures Make Amazing Microscope Photos

This amazing microscope image of a carnivorous bladderwort is this year's winner of the Olympus BioScapes digital imaging competition. The close-ups that landed in the top 10 of the competition are a stunning collection of tiny living things. From a glassworm to a bat embryo, these images are pretty incredible, but the winning shot above is a standout.

Taken by Igor Siwanowicz, the photo shows the open trap of an aquatic carnivorous plant known as a humped bladderwort (Utricularia gibba). The plant floats in water waiting for its prey to touch its trigger hairs, which cause the plant to open its trap so quickly that it sucks in water as well as some unlucky microinvertebrates. The pretty little flakes near the bottom of the image are single-cell algae that live inside the trap. The image is magnified 100 times.


Image

Rest of the top ten at the link
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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Thu Jan 02, 2014 9:33 pm

Odor Receptors Discovered in Lungs: Just Like Ones in Your Nose but Instead of Conjuring Up a Cup of Coffee They Might Make You Cough

Jan. 2, 2014 — Your nose is not the only organ in your body that can sense cigarette smoke wafting through the air. Scientists at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Iowa have showed that your lungs have odor receptors as well.

Unlike the receptors in your nose, which are located in the membranes of nerve cells, the ones in your lungs are in the membranes of neuroendocrine cells. Instead of sending nerve impulses to your brain that allow it to "perceive" the acrid smell of a burning cigarette somewhere in the vicinity, they trigger the flask-shaped neuroendocrine cells to dump hormones that make your airways constrict.
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The_Phenomenal_Sage

Wrasslin' Fan

Postby The_Phenomenal_Sage » Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:12 pm

I found this article in the Economist interesting and given the nature of this sub-thread, thought I'd post it.

Trouble at the lab: Scientists like to think of science as self-correcting. To an alarming degree, it is not

The idea that the same experiments always get the same results, no matter who performs them, is one of the cornerstones of science’s claim to objective truth. If a systematic campaign of replication does not lead to the same results, then either the original research is flawed (as the replicators claim) or the replications are (as many of the original researchers on priming contend). Either way, something is awry...

The idea that there are a lot of uncorrected flaws in published studies may seem hard to square with the fact that almost all of them will have been through peer-review. This sort of scrutiny by disinterested experts—acting out of a sense of professional obligation, rather than for pay—is often said to make the scientific literature particularly reliable. In practice it is poor at detecting many types of error.

John Bohannon, a biologist at Harvard, recently submitted a pseudonymous paper on the effects of a chemical derived from lichen on cancer cells to 304 journals describing themselves as using peer review. An unusual move; but it was an unusual paper, concocted wholesale and stuffed with clangers in study design, analysis and interpretation of results. Receiving this dog’s dinner from a fictitious researcher at a made up university, 157 of the journals accepted it for publication.

Dr Bohannon’s sting was directed at the lower tier of academic journals. But in a classic 1998 study Fiona Godlee, editor of the prestigious British Medical Journal, sent an article containing eight deliberate mistakes in study design, analysis and interpretation to more than 200 of the BMJ’s regular reviewers. Not one picked out all the mistakes. On average, they reported fewer than two; some did not spot any.






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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Tue Jan 21, 2014 12:27 pm

Sleeping Rosetta Spacecraft Wakes Up for Historic Comet Rendezvous and Landing

A European probe awoke from a deep sleep Monday (Jan. 20) to gear up for an unprecedented comet rendezvous and landing this year that will cap a 10-year voyage across the solar system.

After two and a half years in hibernation, the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft emerged from its slumber while cruising nearly 418 million miles (673 million kilometers) from the sun. The wakeup call, which was due to begin at 5 a.m. EST (1000 GMT), took hours as Rosetta switched on heaters to warm itself after its long night in the cold depths of space.
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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Thu Jan 23, 2014 1:52 pm

Herschel detects that Ceres has large amounts of water

Ceres has always been believed to have an icy, rocky surface and now new evidence finally confirms that this is true. Scientists using the Herschel Space Telescope have detected ice on the surface and water vapor in the dwarf planet’s atmosphere. The study was led by Michael Küppers of the ESA and the results were published in Nature.

Ceres is the largest and roundest body within the main asteroid belt which exists between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. First discovered in 1801, Ceres was classified as a planet. It would later be reclassified as the first named asteroid by Sir William Herschel. In 2006, the meeting of the International Astronomical Union voted on specific definitions for different planetary bodies, resulting in yet another reclassification of Ceres, this time as a dwarf planet. This was the same meeting that reclassified Pluto to dwarf planet status as well. Ceres has only about 1% of the mass of the moon with an estimated surface area about the size of Argentina.

Though Ceres has always been believed to have ice on the surface, it has never actually been shown before. The researchers used the Herschel Space Telescope to study radiation deflecting off of Ceres and found that the wavelength indicated the presence of water vapor. Not only does the dwarf planet have ice, it has a lot of it. Researchers believe that surrounding its rocky core is a mantle of ice so thick, it could very well hold more water than Earth does.
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Stephen Day

Wrasslin' Fan

Postby Stephen Day » Thu Jan 23, 2014 7:01 pm



Very cool, It's fun to imagine what might be going on under the ice of these two moons.
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Strict31

Rain Partier

Postby Strict31 » Thu Jan 23, 2014 7:12 pm

Stephen Day wrote:
Very cool, It's fun to imagine what might be going on under the ice of these two moons.


Whatever it is, I hope it's delicious, because we've already eaten most of the edible things in our own seas.
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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Thu Jan 23, 2014 10:48 pm


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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Thu Jan 23, 2014 10:49 pm

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