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Strict31
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Re: Science News

Postby Strict31 » Fri Feb 24, 2012 12:14 am

sdsichero wrote:Imagine being a reported and reporting the wind speed...

Black hole clocks fastest wind ever recorded by NASA



I don't want to say the chick who wrote that article is a fuck-tard, but she's got a couple of details about black holes wrong.
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And now and then stab, as occasion serves."


Edward II: Act 2 Scene 1, by Christopher Marlowe

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Fri Feb 24, 2012 10:37 am

Strict31 wrote:
I don't want to say the chick who wrote that article is a fuck-tard, but she's got a couple of details about black holes wrong.


Is this one better?
http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2012/0223/NASA-clocks-20-million-mph-winds-near-black-hole

Another (space.com via Fox)
http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/02/23/cosmic-hurricane-black-hole-has-20-million-mph-winds/

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Re: Science News

Postby Strict31 » Fri Feb 24, 2012 10:42 am



It is good that the other two articles mention black hole magnetic fields and accretion disks.
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"You must be proud, bold, pleasant, resolute,
And now and then stab, as occasion serves."


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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:32 pm

I guess homelessness is everywhere. Will they call at least one of them Yonada?

Researchers say galaxy may swarm with 'nomad planets'

Our galaxy may be awash in homeless planets, wandering through space instead of orbiting a star.

In fact, there may be 100,000 times more "nomad planets" in the Milky Way than stars, according to a new study by researchers at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), a joint institute of Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

If observations confirm the estimate, this new class of celestial objects will affect current theories of planet formation and could change our understanding of the origin and abundance of life.

"If any of these nomad planets are big enough to have a thick atmosphere, they could have trapped enough heat for bacterial life to exist," said Louis Strigari, leader of the team that reported the result in a paper submitted to the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Although nomad planets don't bask in the warmth of a star, they may generate heat through internal radioactive decay and tectonic activity.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:33 pm

IBM carbon probe views electron movement in molecule

IBM researchers in Switzerland have seen the movement of charge within a molecule for the first time, using a microscope tipped with a single carbon atom.

The team adapted an existing form of atomic force microscopy called Kelvin probe force microscopy, by using a microscopic scanning bar that measures the electric field generated by a charge in a molecule. The probe has to operate at near absolute zero and in a total vacuum, but successfully traced a charge across the subject.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:53 pm

hmn...

Diabetes Drug Improves Glucose Control Without Increasing Risk of Hypoglycemia, Study Suggests

Too high? Too low? Only about half of those with type 2 diabetes have their blood sugar levels on target, but a new drug shows promise in managing glucose levels. TAK-875 works by boosting the release of insulin from pancreatic B cells, but only when diabetics need it most – such as when glucose and fatty acids rise in the blood after a meal.

TAK-875, a new treatment for type 2 diabetes, improves blood sugar control and is equally effective as glimepiride, but has a significantly lower risk of creating a dangerous drop in blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, according to a new study.

The results of the phase 2 randomized trial were published in The Lancet.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:55 pm

RNA Interference Cancer Treatment? Delivering RNA With Tiny Sponge-Like Spheres

For the past decade, scientists have been pursuing cancer treatments based on RNA interference -- a phenomenon that offers a way to shut off malfunctioning genes with short snippets of RNA. However, one huge challenge remains: finding a way to efficiently deliver the RNA.

Most of the time, short interfering RNA (siRNA) -- the type used for RNA interference -- is quickly broken down inside the body by enzymes that defend against infection by RNA viruses.

"It's been a real struggle to try to design a delivery system that allows us to administer siRNA, especially if you want to target it to a specific part of the body," says Paula Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor in Engineering at MIT.

Hammond and her colleagues have now come up with a novel delivery vehicle in which RNA is packed into microspheres so dense that they withstand degradation until they reach their destinations. The new system, described Feb. 26 in the journal Nature Materials, knocks down expression of specific genes as effectively as existing delivery methods, but with a much smaller dose of particles.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Mon Feb 27, 2012 3:57 pm

'Universal' Vaccines Could Finally Allow for Wide-Scale Flu Prevention

An emerging class of long-lasting flu vaccines could do more than just save people the trouble of an annual flu shot.

Princeton University-based researchers have found that the "universal" vaccine could for the first time allow for the effective, wide-scale prevention of flu by limiting the influenza virus' ability to spread and mutate. Universal, or cross-protective, vaccines -- so named for their effectiveness against several flu strains -- are being developed in various labs worldwide and some are already in clinical trials.

The researchers recently reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that the new vaccines would make a bout with influenza less severe, making it more difficult for the virus to spread. At the same time, the vaccines would target relatively unchanging parts of the virus and hamper the virus' notorious ability to evolve and evade immunity; current flu vaccines target the pathogen's most adaptable components.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:19 pm

Neutrinos shot through 780 feet of stone, spell out their name

A group of researchers communicated a message through 780 feet of solid stone using a beam of neutrinos, the University of Rochester announced Wednesday. When the message came out the other side, the scientists were able to read it perfectly: it said, perhaps unimaginatively, "Neutrino."

Because the equipment is so expensive, actual communication with neutrinos is still a long way off. Still, the authors note that the particles are barely affected by gravity and not affected at all by magnetism; eventually, they could provide a stable alternative to the electromagnetic waves we use now.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:21 pm

Human fossils hint at new species

The remains of what may be a previously unknown human species have been identified in southern China.

The bones, which represent at least five individuals, have been dated to between 11,500 and 14,500 years ago.

But scientists are calling them simply the Red Deer Cave people, after one of the sites where they were unearthed.

The team has told the PLoS One journal that far more detailed analysis of the fossils is required before they can be ascribed to a new human lineage.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:23 pm

Kashmir Scientists Clone Rare Cashmere Goat

Scientists said Thursday they have cloned a rare Himalayan goat in Indian-controlled Kashmir, hoping to help increase the number of animals famed for their silky soft undercoats used to make pashmina wool, or cashmere.

The March 9 birth of female kid "Noori," which means "light" in Arabic, could spark breeding programs across the region and mass production of the high-priced wool, said lead project scientist Dr. Riaz Ahmad Shah, a veterinarian in the animal biotechnology center of Sher-i-Kashmir University.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:30 pm

The thing sounds like something Topo might like.

NASA, GM Team To Develop 'Robo-Glove'

With the help of General Motors (GM), NASA has developed new robotic glove that could help astronauts and auto workers reduce repetitive stress injuries.

The work on the Robo-Glove is an extension of a partnership between the two that created the first humanoid robot in space.

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Re: Science News

Postby sdsichero » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:33 pm

"safely" eh? Hmn.

Pentagon seeks cheap, disposable satellites to observe battlefields

Ordinary U.S. troops can only dream of on-demand battlefield images from the U.S. military's limited fleet of satellites. That spurred the Pentagon to envision swarms of cheap, disposable satellites that can give small squads of soldiers or Special Forces the latest battlefield images on their mobile phones or tablet computers.

The military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) research lab aims to launch about two dozen satellites — each costing about $500,000 — for missions lasting 60 to 90 days in low-Earth orbit. Such satellites would not only launch cheaply from aircraft rather than ground-based rocket launch pads, but could also de-orbit at the end of their mission lifetime and burn up safely in the Earth's atmosphere.

"We envision a constellation of small satellites, at a fraction of the cost of airborne systems, that would allow deployed warfighters overseas to hit 'see me' on existing handheld devices and in less than 90 minutes receive a satellite image of their precise location to aid in mission planning," said Dave Barnhart, program manager for DARPA.

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