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What movies still pull your heartstrings?

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NedPepper

cheese

Postby NedPepper » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:04 pm

Nightfly wrote:It simultaneously and graphically conveys a desperate man losing the only thing in the world he cares about (the very thing that sustained his sanity), while also reflecting what a pitiful broken reality it is that the thing he cares so much about is an anthropomorphized rubber ball / silent imaginary friend.

Now, that's sad. :(


Yeah, it's poignant, but I remember sitting on my couch and turning to see one my buddies damn near bawling at that scene. I hate to say this, but I seriously felt like slapping him and yelling "SNAP OUT OF IT."

There was a whole room of dudes watching that movie and one guy bawling his eyes out. It was a little uncomfortable, but a hell of a lot of fun busting his chops about it the rest of the day. :-D
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Nightfly

Staff Writer

Postby Nightfly » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:04 pm

NedPepper wrote:Dancer In the Dark is kind of manipulative, though. Yeah, I got choked up, but I give more credit to Bjork than to the Lars Von Trier's constant "I hate America" movies.

I love his movies! :D Especially the elaborate set design. ;-)
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NedPepper

cheese

Postby NedPepper » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:09 pm

Nightfly wrote:I love his movies! :D Especially the elaborate set design. ;-)


lol...Yeah, he went all out on Dogville. Look, I'm the first person to point fingers at my country's faults, but Lars Von Trier's interesting perspective on American History is slighty askew. I'd give him credit if he actually did some research, or here's an idea, CAME TO AMERICA to see it for himself.

The guy refuses to even step foot on American soil.

And I'm not a guy who gets all patriotic and macho when Europeans insult us, but this guy is too much.

Even the most liberal movie critics have caught on to his bullshit now. It's manipulative garbage that is completely detached from reality.

Amazingly, Dancer in the Dark is his most SUBTLE jab at America.
User avatar

Lord Simian

The Lord of the Monkeys

Postby Lord Simian » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:11 pm

I can't be arsed to read the thread to see if it's been mentioned, but I'm here to say:

WHAT DREAMS MAY COME.
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john lewis hawk

Founder of The Outhouse

Postby john lewis hawk » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:13 pm

NedPepper wrote:lol...Yeah, he went all out on Dogville. Look, I'm the first person to point fingers at my country's faults, but Lars Von Trier's interesting perspective on American History is slighty askew. I'd give him credit if he actually did some research, or here's an idea, CAME TO AMERICA to see it for himself.

The guy refuses to even step foot on American soil.

And I'm not a guy who gets all patriotic and macho when Europeans insult us, but this guy is too much.

Even the most liberal movie critics have caught on to his bullshit now. It's manipulative garbage that is completely detached from reality.

Amazingly, Dancer in the Dark is his most SUBTLE jab at America.
I usually find that people like that are usually people who have the same flaws.
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Nightfly

Staff Writer

Postby Nightfly » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:22 pm

NedPepper wrote:lol...Yeah, he went all out on Dogville. Look, I'm the first person to point fingers at my country's faults, but Lars Von Trier's interesting perspective on American History is slighty askew. I'd give him credit if he actually did some research, or here's an idea, CAME TO AMERICA to see it for himself.

The guy refuses to even step foot on American soil.

And I'm not a guy who gets all patriotic and macho when Europeans insult us, but this guy is too much.

Even the most liberal movie critics have caught on to his bullshit now. It's manipulative garbage that is completely detached from reality.

Amazingly, Dancer in the Dark is his most SUBTLE jab at America.

I guess a lot of it depends on how personally one takes the perceived insults. Who are the other European filmmakers famous for insulting us?

I've read a lot of interviews w/ Lars and I get the impression his films are mostly about human flaws magnified - he just enjoys reminding Americans that we're human too. It's the people he highlights, not our democracy or whatnot.

Mostly, I just enjoy any opportunity to see Nicole Kidman's or Bryce Howard's naked breasts :D Even if it is in odd or (so-called) unpatriotic films.
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NedPepper

cheese

Postby NedPepper » Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:44 pm

Nightfly wrote:I guess a lot of it depends on how personally one takes the perceived insults. Who are the other European filmmakers famous for insulting us?

I've read a lot of interviews w/ Lars and I get the impression his films are mostly about human flaws magnified - he just enjoys reminding Americans that we're human too. It's the people he highlights, not our democracy or whatnot.

Mostly, I just enjoy any opportunity to see Nicole Kidman's or Bryce Howard's naked breasts :D Even if it is in odd or (so-called) unpatriotic films.


I'm not just talking about filmmakers who insult Americans. Even though a lot of them take subtle jabs, but they make interesting points.

And I don't have any links to give you of Von Trier, but I remember distinctly an interview in Entertainment Weekly where he famously said he refuses to step foot in America. And I'm okay with him having a problem with our foreign policy or whatever.

My problem comes from his strange, contrived, delusional take on American community.

The rape scene in Dogville for me was the breaking point for me. I just couldn't take him seriously anymore after that.

What's sad is that he has the potential to be a visionary and has shown it in work like his original Kingdom Hospital, Breaking the Waves, and even the bizarro America depicted in Dancer In the Dark.

But his Grace trilogy? It's really a study in sadism, which in his mind he links to American society.
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chap22

Rain Partier

Postby chap22 » Tue Aug 26, 2008 9:56 am

NedPepper wrote:Yeah, but aren't you married?

Any guy in the last couple years who has dated a girl has probably had to watch the Notebook.

It's a prerequisite now. :-D

bullshit. that's what her best girl friend is for. :-D
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Strict31

Rain Partier

Postby Strict31 » Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:06 am

chap22 wrote:bullshit. that's what her best girl friend is for. :-D


I just think he hasn't found the right girl. My fiance wouldn't be caught dead watching this Notebook silly-shit. One time, she got pissed at me because we missed a UFC PPV.
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zombiemichaeljackson

rubber spoon

Postby zombiemichaeljackson » Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:08 am

I wanted to take this opportunity to point out that my girlfriend also rules and hates The Notebook as much as I do.

Unfortunately, my mother likes it and made me watch it when I went home to visit her a last year. :?
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McKegan

Zombie Guard

Postby McKegan » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:14 am

NedPepper wrote:But his Grace trilogy? It's really a study in sadism, which in his mind he links to American society.


To be fair, he doesn't portray his own people in the most favorable of lights. I think he just has a low opinion of people in general (see Breaking the Waves, just as sadistic and nothing to do with America).
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zombiemichaeljackson

rubber spoon

Postby zombiemichaeljackson » Tue Aug 26, 2008 11:42 am

I mentioned this is passing earlier, but has anyone else seen Tideland? I finally got around to watching it over the weekend and I really liked it. I have absolutely no desire to ever watch it again, but I liked it.

I guess I can understand why everyone was so put off by the movie, but I think a lot of it was blown out of proportion. Was I creeped out that the little girl was living with a corpse and a 'young kisser' with a handicapped gut that was probably 3 times her age? Absolutely, but I also think that was the point, and in regards to her relationship with Dickens, I kind of felt like she was using him more than he was using her, which I found an interesting inversion of the social norm.

Regardless, an 8 year old girl yelling at her father's decomposing corpse to stop 'cutting muffins' and not to 'blame it on me!' had me laughing.
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billyzoom666

cheese

Postby billyzoom666 » Tue Aug 26, 2008 4:34 pm

twoheads wrote:I mentioned this is passing earlier, but has anyone else seen Tideland? I finally got around to watching it over the weekend and I really liked it. I have absolutely no desire to ever watch it again, but I liked it.

I guess I can understand why everyone was so put off by the movie, but I think a lot of it was blown out of proportion. Was I creeped out that the little girl was living with a corpse and a 'young kisser' with a handicapped gut that was probably 3 times her age? Absolutely, but I also think that was the point, and in regards to her relationship with Dickens, I kind of felt like she was using him more than he was using her, which I found an interesting inversion of the social norm.

Regardless, an 8 year old girl yelling at her father's decomposing corpse to stop 'cutting muffins' and not to 'blame it on me!' had me laughing.


I saw it right when it came out on DVD, maybe a bit over a year ago. I didn't like it, I guess I expected more, or at least something different. Bridges/Gilliam, I thought it'd be gold, but I was disappointed. It bored me to tears. Like I said, I probably need to go back and see it again. I had no idea what it was about or who was in it, just that it had "Directed by Terry Gilliam" on the cover, so I rented it sight unseen.
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zombiemichaeljackson

rubber spoon

Postby zombiemichaeljackson » Tue Aug 26, 2008 5:17 pm

billyzoom666 wrote:I saw it right when it came out on DVD, maybe a bit over a year ago. I didn't like it, I guess I expected more, or at least something different. Bridges/Gilliam, I thought it'd be gold, but I was disappointed. It bored me to tears. Like I said, I probably need to go back and see it again. I had no idea what it was about or who was in it, just that it had "Directed by Terry Gilliam" on the cover, so I rented it sight unseen.


Well, it's the kind of movie that people tend to either really like or really hate. The fact that you were bored by it is kind of interesting.
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billyzoom666

cheese

Postby billyzoom666 » Tue Aug 26, 2008 5:24 pm

twoheads wrote:Well, it's the kind of movie that people tend to either really like or really hate. The fact that you were bored by it is kind of interesting.


Maybe bored isn't the right word, I just sort of lost interest in it. Like I said, I was expecting something different. I've definitely seen worse. I should revisit.

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