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Diamond Announces Top Products For January 2011 - Sales Drop 25%

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Benderbrau

Twenty-Something

Postby Benderbrau » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:00 pm

Always Right wrote:It's all well and good saying comic books are to much, but this is how much paper costs. They can't reduce prices. Just a dead industry not moving with the times. We should be celebrating the growth of TPB's like Scott Pilgrim and Kick Ass not mourning the loss of heroes who haven't been relevant in years.

I don't believe that the cost of comics is in line with the rising costs of production. I think the rising cost is greatly influenced by the financial demands of the staff and the increased quality of the work. I don't imagine that Stan Lee or Jack Kirby earned a third of what Joe Q or Jim Lee's asking price is relatively speaking. I also don't think we need high gloss paper and computer generated full spectrum color processing either. It's fucking comic book. Not a Norman Rockwell.

3MJ

Postby 3MJ » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:03 pm

But they've said all along switching to newsprint will not cut costs at all.

3MJ

Postby 3MJ » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:04 pm

Nice to see the mainstream approved F4 is top of the list. Can't wait to see where the resurrection issue places in the chart.
User avatar

chap22

Rain Partier

Postby chap22 » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:11 pm

more proof that comic fans are sheep who buy "events" over actual story.

the thoroughly underwhelming FF 587 is the highest seller, even though it was pretty much terrible.

Brightest Day finished 2nd and 3rd despite being a snooze-fest with more pacing problems than a Model T running a NASCAR rce, while the goddamn infinitely better JL: Generation Lost finished 42nd and 44th for the month :smt011 :smt011

people make me sick
User avatar

Apache Chef

Expert Post Whore

Postby Apache Chef » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:13 pm

Always Right wrote:But they've said all along switching to newsprint will not cut costs at all.



Which would mean it's not the cost of paper itself driving up the price. It's probably not the cost of printing itself either. Paper companies and commercial printers are begging for business right now, which means their rates are probably at an all-time low.

Payroll is what is driving up costs. Comics have also lost circulation, and with that, they lose out on advertising dollars. But either way, if the plan is for Marvel and DC to drop the price of a comic by $1 and only sacrifice 2 pages, that should show you how much the price is fluffed up.
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Rikk Odinson

Society Member

Postby Rikk Odinson » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:18 pm

Benderbrau wrote:I don't believe that the cost of comics is in line with the rising costs of production. I think the rising cost is greatly influenced by the financial demands of the staff and the increased quality of the work. I don't imagine that Stan Lee or Jack Kirby earned a third of what Joe Q or Jim Lee's asking price is relatively speaking. I also don't think we need high gloss paper and computer generated full spectrum color processing either. It's fucking comic book. Not a Norman Rockwell.



I would bet that Stan and Jack and the gang lived in the cheaper parts of town and sure as hell didn't have the money to fly back and forth from coast to coast for conferances and conventions either.
These douches have people thinking they should make a shit ton of money while the fans that buy the overpriced drawn out stories have to decide on comics or food or personal hygeine supplies while the "creators" sit in their homes playing the newest game systems or watching their blu-ray flicks in between the couple hours a day they actually "work".
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fieldy snuts

Rain Partier

Postby fieldy snuts » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:56 pm

Spawn made the top 10? :|
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superfictious

Humuhumunukunukuapuaa

Postby superfictious » Thu Feb 03, 2011 3:59 pm

Spawn #200 is #4. Really? Yeah, the industry as a whole is dying although I'm sure the Big 2 will be around for a while. Nobody else seems to have figured out a way to translate this vast multimedia, Information Age into successful sales. I know it's a popular sentiment to denounce 'fan involvement' in the creative process, but sooner or later the fans will have to take over the industry and find innovative ways to save it, open-source style, or TPTB will have to ball up and give new readers a reason to care.
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Stalzer2002

Motherfucker from Hell

Postby Stalzer2002 » Thu Feb 03, 2011 5:06 pm

False Prophet wrote:. I know it's a popular sentiment to denounce 'fan involvement' in the creative process, but sooner or later the fans will have to take over the industry and find innovative ways to save it, open-source style, or TPTB will have to ball up and give new readers a reason to care.


Honestly, I don't think comic fans can or are willing to find innovative ways to save the comic medium. This topic has been coming up for years now, and all we hear over and over again is "Lower prices and spinner racks. Lower prices and spinner racks." That's not innovative, that's a retreat into the 1970s way of looking at things, something that cannot and will not work in 2011. We've been talking about how the medium needs to evolve or die for years, and fanboys have clearly chosen the die option.
User avatar

superfictious

Humuhumunukunukuapuaa

Postby superfictious » Thu Feb 03, 2011 5:14 pm

Stalzer2002 wrote:
Honestly, I don't think comic fans can or are willing to find innovative ways to save the comic medium. This topic has been coming up for years now, and all we hear over and over again is "Lower prices and spinner racks. Lower prices and spinner racks." That's not innovative, that's a retreat into the 1970s way of looking at things, something that cannot and will not work in 2011. We've been talking about how the medium needs to evolve or die for years, and fanboys have clearly chosen the die option.


Yeah, and it's sad because there's so much potential for actual positive fan involvement. I'd love lower prices and more availability too, but the prevalent format doesn't allow it. The industry is small and niche enough to allow greater fan responsibility and creativity. It took Kinect owners all of 48 hours to figure out ways to expand and innovate the product beyond its intended use, and I'm sure comic fans have the same type of ingenuity.

3MJ

Postby 3MJ » Thu Feb 03, 2011 6:46 pm

False Prophet wrote:
Yeah, and it's sad because there's so much potential for actual positive fan involvement. I'd love lower prices and more availability too, but the prevalent format doesn't allow it. The industry is small and niche enough to allow greater fan responsibility and creativity. It took Kinect owners all of 48 hours to figure out ways to expand and innovate the product beyond its intended use, and I'm sure comic fans have the same type of ingenuity.


If you had to sum up the average comic fan on this site, it'd be backwards looking and longing for similarity.
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Benderbrau

Twenty-Something

Postby Benderbrau » Thu Feb 03, 2011 6:50 pm

Always Right wrote:
If you had to sum up the average comic fan on this site, it'd be backwards looking and longing for similarity.

If I had to sum up the average comic fan on this site, it'd be mild retard and future rapist.
User avatar

DonDaddyD

cheese

Postby DonDaddyD » Fri Feb 04, 2011 6:13 am

Personally, I thought this was, in part, spot on:

Global recession, terrible financial climate, rising fuel prices, food costs soaring, diminishing currencies and two European countries bailed out.

In England, taxes are high, currency is down, people are fearful for their jobs. The hidden code in the papers is telling you to stack cans of beans as high as your celing will let you.

The comic companies action: raise prices $3.99 and publish more titles, integrate more storylines across titles (forcing the consumer to buy more). The comic industry acted as if there wasn't a recession whereas other industries were cutting prices and reducing services/products.

Comics are non-essential so its no surprise people would cut back on non-essential (arguably premium in the case of $3.99 comics) goods.

I'm of the thought that the comic industry has enjoyed something of a boom. While the bubble and hasn't and isn't likely to burst, the size of the bubble - the market - will reduce to a more accurate size that represents collectors and people who do see comics as essential or high priority items.
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e_galston

Staff Writer

Postby e_galston » Fri Feb 04, 2011 12:58 pm

another reason why there was a decline in "sales" there were less comics published last month then the year before. last january there was 683 books published, whereas this january there were 555 books published including variants
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SilverPhoenix

Staff Writer

Postby SilverPhoenix » Fri Feb 04, 2011 1:13 pm

Once we get the full numbers, should I write an article analyzing all of this?

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