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The Unwritten #31.5 (Nobody fries tonight Spoilers)

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Punchy

Staff Writer

Postby Punchy » Sat Nov 26, 2011 12:40 pm

Let the double-shipping commence! Coming after the massive upheavals of #31, this issue of back-story was kind of disappointing, but once I got into it, I enjoyed my history lesson just as much as I did Tom’s magic adventures. My only real complain about this issue was that Wilson Taylor’s handwriting was difficult to read at points, but it didn’t effect the story too much. I liked all 3 stories a lot, and appreciated how much Carey knows about history and the history of stories, and how he manages to teach the reader something, but not make it boring. I think my favourite story was the one about the Newspaper cartoonist who inadvertently caused America’s involvement the Spanish Civil War, it was gripping and scary, and it was just two men in a room! And it’s all (based on) true! The art throughout the issue was great, especially Bryan Talbot, who is just amazing.
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habitual

Silly French Man

Postby habitual » Sat Nov 26, 2011 2:31 pm

Punchy wrote:Let the double-shipping commence! Coming after the massive upheavals of #31, this issue of back-story was kind of disappointing, but once I got into it, I enjoyed my history lesson just as much as I did Tom’s magic adventures.

My only real complain about this issue was that Wilson Taylor’s handwriting was difficult to read at points, but it didn’t effect the story too much. I liked all 3 stories a lot, and appreciated how much Carey knows about history and the history of stories, and how he manages to teach the reader something, but not make it boring.

I think my favourite story was the one about the Newspaper cartoonist who inadvertently caused America’s involvement the Spanish Civil War, it was gripping and scary, and it was just two men in a room! And it’s all (based on) true!

The art throughout the issue was great, especially Bryan Talbot, who is just amazing.


So much easier to read.

Hab
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oogy

Zombie Guard

Postby oogy » Sat Nov 26, 2011 8:16 pm

Punchy wrote:Let the double-shipping commence! Coming after the massive upheavals of #31, this issue of back-story was kind of disappointing, but once I got into it, I enjoyed my history lesson just as much as I did Tom’s magic adventures. My only real complain about this issue was that Wilson Taylor’s handwriting was difficult to read at points, but it didn’t effect the story too much. I liked all 3 stories a lot, and appreciated how much Carey knows about history and the history of stories, and how he manages to teach the reader something, but not make it boring. I think my favourite story was the one about the Newspaper cartoonist who inadvertently caused America’s involvement the Spanish Civil War, it was gripping and scary, and it was just two men in a room! And it’s all (based on) true! The art throughout the issue was great, especially Bryan Talbot, who is just amazing.

I think I liked the first story the most, but they were all three great! It was a nice break from the Tom Taylor adventures and I'm really looking forward to the double shipping of this book for the next few months, despite my constant bitching about another company's double shipping practices.

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