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They had me at "Hyperion" (Avengers #4 Spoilers)

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GOSD

Everybody lies!

Postby GOSD » Thu Jan 31, 2013 10:55 am

I loved it as well, ESF.

Hyperion (to me anyway) has always been portrayed as Marvel's Superman but dumber. It's nice to finally get inside his head and see that there's actually something in there.
User avatar

TimDrake'sDumbWings

Motherfucker from Hell

Postby TimDrake'sDumbWings » Thu Jan 31, 2013 1:46 pm

I thought this issue was pretty tight. This unique spin on Superman's origin was great, but I enjoyed how the storyline from the previous issue didn't just disappear to accommodate the origin of a new character. I hope we see more of this in the upcoming Smasher and Captain Universe issues.

Anyone else bothered by Adam Kubert's pencils? They were kind of Billy-Tan-looking, and that's not good for anyone.
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Amoebas

Son of Stein

Postby Amoebas » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:06 am

What I don't get is how Thor over his years has been down to the deepest pits of fiery hell and has practically walked on suns.

Yet he's the only to complain about how hot the Savage Land is. :lol:

ElijahSnowFan wrote:For how I view books with very large casts, this is the way to go. You have a narrative, a theme. You basically have a narrator telling you the story, with the conversations between characters serving to bridge the gaps in the narrative. When you have characters as much as 50 years old, that's absolutely the best way to go -- we've seen Thor and Hawkeye and Black Widow and Carol Danvers for years and years and years.

At this point in the history of these characters, having them offer narrative is somewhat painful. Let them do things. It's why these are comic books.

As a comic fan for 30+ years, I agree with this. But as just a pure comic fan I can't because you omit the new reader. They need to know the (old or new) characters narratives (even if it makes for some clunky writing). As Shooter used to say, every comic book is somebodies first.
User avatar

Amoebas

Son of Stein

Postby Amoebas » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:06 am

What I don't get is how Thor over his years has been down to the deepest pits of fiery hell and has practically walked on suns.

Yet he's the only to complain about how hot the Savage Land is. :lol:

ElijahSnowFan wrote:For how I view books with very large casts, this is the way to go. You have a narrative, a theme. You basically have a narrator telling you the story, with the conversations between characters serving to bridge the gaps in the narrative. When you have characters as much as 50 years old, that's absolutely the best way to go -- we've seen Thor and Hawkeye and Black Widow and Carol Danvers for years and years and years.

At this point in the history of these characters, having them offer narrative is somewhat painful. Let them do things. It's why these are comic books.

As a comic fan for 30+ years, I agree with this. But as just a pure comic fan I can't because you omit the new reader. They need to know the (old or new) characters narratives (even if it makes for some clunky writing). As Shooter used to say, every comic book is somebodies first.
User avatar

ElijahSnowFan

cheese

Postby ElijahSnowFan » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:10 pm

Amoebas wrote:What I don't get is how Thor over his years has been down to the deepest pits of fiery hell and has practically walked on suns.

Yet he's the only to complain about how hot the Savage Land is. :lol:


As a comic fan for 30+ years, I agree with this. But as just a pure comic fan I can't because you omit the new reader. They need to know the (old or new) characters narratives (even if it makes for some clunky writing). As Shooter used to say, every comic book is somebodies first.


Excellent point, kind sir! You are correct: I definitely was not being "new reader friendly" in my earlier post...I should try to be a little more cognizant of that in the future.
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sdsichero

2k11 Outhouse People's Champion

Postby sdsichero » Fri Feb 01, 2013 9:23 pm

Amoebas wrote:What I don't get is how Thor over his years has been down to the deepest pits of fiery hell and has practically walked on suns.

Yet he's the only to complain about how hot the Savage Land is. :lol:

It's not the heat, it's the humidity
User avatar

Agent Panic

crash test dummy

Postby Agent Panic » Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:25 pm

I like this interpretation of Hyperion and it was a decent issue.

I still miss Supreme Power, though.
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Lord Simian

The Lord of the Monkeys

Postby Lord Simian » Sun Feb 03, 2013 12:15 am

Has he been mind controlled yet? :P
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Amoebas

Son of Stein

Postby Amoebas » Sun Feb 03, 2013 12:24 am

Lord Simian wrote:Has he been mind controlled yet? :P

:lol: Brer Hawkeye rules!
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:09 am

Back when Shooter said that, there were actually new readers to consider...
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GHERU

Rain Partier

Postby GHERU » Sun Feb 03, 2013 10:49 am

one halfway decent issue isn't going to put this back on my pull list
just two more to go from DCBS and I'm done
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Stephen Day

Wrasslin' Fan

Postby Stephen Day » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:27 pm

I like this new version of Hyperion. The only problem I have is with the origin. The way things were written it seems like he comes from a universe in which the Squadron Supreme's takeover of Earth was successful. The thing is, The entire point of the 80s Squadron Supreme series in which they took over their Earth was that it was inherently a bad idea. Having an Earth in which it actually worked kind of undercuts the message of Mark Gruenwald's classic series. Being a big fan of that series, I'm pretty sure I don't like that idea.
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Amoebas

Son of Stein

Postby Amoebas » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:45 pm

Stephen Day wrote:I like this new version of Hyperion. The only problem I have is with the origin. The way things were written it seems like he comes from a universe in which the Squadron Supreme's takeover of Earth was successful. The thing is, The entire point of the 80s Squadron Supreme series in which they took over their Earth was that it was inherently a bad idea. Having an Earth in which it actually worked kind of undercuts the message of Mark Gruenwald's classic series. Being a big fan of that series, I'm pretty sure I don't like that idea.

Didn't put that together myself but damn if you're not spot on. Gruenwald's mini is one of the best ever.
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Tintin Quarantino

Rain Partier

Postby Tintin Quarantino » Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:01 pm

Didn't What If prove that it's a multiverse full of potential outcomes? Don't get so hung up on continuity it becomes unhealthy. And the comics from the 1980s--would Mark Gruenwald have been so overly concerned with being in lock-step with the comics that came 30 years before him?
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Stephen Day

Wrasslin' Fan

Postby Stephen Day » Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:05 pm

Amoebas wrote:Didn't put that together myself but damn if you're not spot on. Gruenwald's mini is one of the best ever.


Agreed, I'll never forget the panel in issue #12 with all of the covered bodies. It seemed like such a waste for all of them to die over a concept that should never have been tried. That one panel was so powerful. It seemed like then entire point of series was summed up in just one drawing.

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