Wednesday, December 17, 2014 • Evening Edition • "For when you've got nowhere else to go."
photojojo: Here’s a 1940s photo of Superman barreling down the...

photojojo: Here’s a 1940s photo of Superman barreling down the...

By xaraan in Blog on November 25, 2011

photojojo: Here’s a 1940s photo of Superman barreling down the road on Thanksgiving Day. Not a bad mug, eh? via dcu Authors: xaraanRead more http://theouthouseblog.tumblr.com/post/13307114918

One Soul

One Soul

By David Bird in Blog on November 21, 2011

One SoulWritten by Ray Fawkes,Art by Ray FawkesPublished by Oni Press,2011This graphic novel istouted as an attempt to push the boundaries of the medium. It tells the storiesof eighteen individual characters, each a panel at a time. That is, every pagehas nine panels and each panel tells the story of a different person. Each twopage spread shows eighteen panels, eighteen characters, at once, and every twopages advances their life stories one panel at a time. Got it?The stories are linked byrecurrent themes, words, and phrases, and by visual images. As they begin, theyare all very similar. A black panel represents the time before theirconception, a white on black smear represents their fetal development, they arenewborns in their mother’s arms, the homes the live in, the worlds they livein, as so forth. Each lives in a different historical period, from Paleolithicto modern times. We see them grow old and die, and once again their panel isblack. They are also linked by the theme of random violence and death. By theidea that, if there is a god, he is indifferent to our sufferings. Some of thecharacters are angry and violent, but all have violence impact their lives insome way. If there is one soul, a life common to us all, then we are asuffering creature, lost in the dark.My last comic review, twoweeks ago, was of Jonathan Case’s work and, like everyone, I marveled at howsomeone with so little experience could produce such a polished work. I couldn’thelp it. In his introduction Steve Lieber draws the reader’s attention to thefact and throughout the whole time you’re reading you can’t help by marvel athow polished the work is, incredibly so for someone’s first work. One Soul doesn’t have an introduction,but it does have a dedication: “To Dorian our beloved son: born and died March13, 2010: In Memoriam.” That’s only fourteen months before this book hit theshelves, so rationally it was already conceived of and well under way beforethe Fawkes family’s tragedy, but it’s impossible to read the book withoutwondering how it was influenced by the event. I read the book twice. After afew pages I stopped and read each character’s story one at a time, though Irandomly selected the order I read them. Then I went back and read frombeginning to end. Fawkes is a writer and his art can be generously described asindie influenced. His hands are so bad, they’re a distraction. I was neverdrawn into any of the stories, but I don’t think that was intended. It is onestory in eighteen lives. In the end I think it’s an interesting concept,structurally speaking, and worth a look because of that.(If you are interested incomics that push the boundaries of form and convention, check out Rebecca Dart’s2004 Rabbithead.)Originally Pubished at: David Bird

One Soul

One Soul

By David Bird in Blog on November 21, 2011

One SoulWritten by Ray Fawkes,Art by Ray FawkesPublished by Oni Press,2011This graphic novel istouted as an attempt to push the boundaries of the medium. It tells the storiesof eighteen individual characters, each a panel at a time. That is, every pagehas nine panels and each panel tells the story of a different person. Each twopage spread shows eighteen panels, eighteen characters, at once, and every twopages advances their life stories one panel at a time. Got it?The stories are linked byrecurrent themes, words, and phrases, and by visual images. As they begin, theyare all very similar. A black panel represents the time before theirconception, a white on black smear represents their fetal development, they arenewborns in their mother’s arms, the homes the live in, the worlds they livein, as so forth. Each lives in a different historical period, from Paleolithicto modern times. We see them grow old and die, and once again their panel isblack. They are also linked by the theme of random violence and death. By theidea that, if there is a god, he is indifferent to our sufferings. Some of thecharacters are angry and violent, but all have violence impact their lives insome way. If there is one soul, a life common to us all, then we are asuffering creature, lost in the dark.My last comic review, twoweeks ago, was of Jonathan Case’s work and, like everyone, I marveled at howsomeone with so little experience could produce such a polished work. I couldn’thelp it. In his introduction Steve Lieber draws the reader’s attention to thefact and throughout the whole time you’re reading you can’t help by marvel athow polished the work is, incredibly so for someone’s first work. One Soul doesn’t have an introduction,but it does have a dedication: “To Dorian our beloved son: born and died March13, 2010: In Memoriam.” That’s only fourteen months before this book hit theshelves, so rationally it was already conceived of and well under way beforethe Fawkes family’s tragedy, but it’s impossible to read the book withoutwondering how it was influenced by the event. I read the book twice. After afew pages I stopped and read each character’s story one at a time, though Irandomly selected the order I read them. Then I went back and read frombeginning to end. Fawkes is a writer and his art can be generously described asindie influenced. His hands are so bad, they’re a distraction. I was neverdrawn into any of the stories, but I don’t think that was intended. It is onestory in eighteen lives. In the end I think it’s an interesting concept,structurally speaking, and worth a look because of that.(If you are interested incomics that push the boundaries of form and convention, check out Rebecca Dart’s2004 Rabbithead.)Originally Pubished at: David Bird

Ponyo

Ponyo

By David Bird in Blog on November 14, 2011

Ponyo (2008)Directed by Hayao MiyazakiPonyo, called Ponyo On The Cliff in Japan, is Miyazaki’s take on The Little Mermaid. In it Brunhilde, a little goldfish princess, sneaks away from her wizard father and encounters a five year old boy, Sosuke, who names her Ponyo. Her father recovers her, but she escapes again, stealing from his magic elixir to become a five year old girl named Ponyo, determined to live with Sosuke.Since 1984 Miyazaki has made ten films and established himself as an animator on par with Walt Disney, his only rival being Jon Lasseter. And there are many film fans who would happily to put him ahead of either of them, so it’s not surprising that any new release would be met with both anticipation and a lot of expectations, and that these expectations can become a barrier between enjoying the film for what it is and viewing in terms of Miyazaki’s whole filmography. And taking that into consideration it’s not surprising that many viewers, myself included watched this movie and thought, ‘it’s great, I mean, it’s Miyazaki, but I really didn’t think as much of it as his other films.’The truth is, Ponyo has some significant weaknesses. It isn’t a complex enough film to balance off the conflicts it raises. Most notably, man and the balance of nature. From the beginning we see an ocean full of pollution and garbage. Fujimoto, Ponyo’s father, rails against it and the need to restore the balance of nature, but in the end its Ponyo’s desire to be human and the use of magic that upset things, not people at all. What is that supposed to mean? The love between Ponyo and Sosuke is also a strong motivator, and an important part of restoring the balance of nature, but the love of two small children is not the same thing as the hormonally, emotionally, and socially driven package that comes with age. Sosuke loves Ponyo in all her forms. Why wouldn’t he? Was there really any reason to think he wouldn’t?On the plus side, this is a Hayao Miyazaki film and as such it brings with it a wealth of talent and artistic vision that stands above most of his contemporaries, in either animated or live action film. The quieter scenes, such as when Ponyo and Sosuke go looking for Sosuke’s mother, are beautiful and magical; recalling the childlike dream quality of My Neighbor Totoro. There is a lot to praise in these moments. They aren’t ancillary to the story’s success, but they don’t drive it either. They make for a beautiful trip, but not always an interesting one.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

Ponyo

Ponyo

By David Bird in Blog on November 14, 2011

Ponyo (2008)Directed by Hayao MiyazakiPonyo, called Ponyo On The Cliff in Japan, is Miyazaki’s take on The Little Mermaid. In it Brunhilde, a little goldfish princess, sneaks away from her wizard father and encounters a five year old boy, Sosuke, who names her Ponyo. Her father recovers her, but she escapes again, stealing from his magic elixir to become a five year old girl named Ponyo, determined to live with Sosuke.Since 1984 Miyazaki has made ten films and established himself as an animator on par with Walt Disney, his only rival being Jon Lasseter. And there are many film fans who would happily to put him ahead of either of them, so it’s not surprising that any new release would be met with both anticipation and a lot of expectations, and that these expectations can become a barrier between enjoying the film for what it is and viewing in terms of Miyazaki’s whole filmography. And taking that into consideration it’s not surprising that many viewers, myself included watched this movie and thought, ‘it’s great, I mean, it’s Miyazaki, but I really didn’t think as much of it as his other films.’The truth is, Ponyo has some significant weaknesses. It isn’t a complex enough film to balance off the conflicts it raises. Most notably, man and the balance of nature. From the beginning we see an ocean full of pollution and garbage. Fujimoto, Ponyo’s father, rails against it and the need to restore the balance of nature, but in the end its Ponyo’s desire to be human and the use of magic that upset things, not people at all. What is that supposed to mean? The love between Ponyo and Sosuke is also a strong motivator, and an important part of restoring the balance of nature, but the love of two small children is not the same thing as the hormonally, emotionally, and socially driven package that comes with age. Sosuke loves Ponyo in all her forms. Why wouldn’t he? Was there really any reason to think he wouldn’t?On the plus side, this is a Hayao Miyazaki film and as such it brings with it a wealth of talent and artistic vision that stands above most of his contemporaries, in either animated or live action film. The quieter scenes, such as when Ponyo and Sosuke go looking for Sosuke’s mother, are beautiful and magical; recalling the childlike dream quality of My Neighbor Totoro. There is a lot to praise in these moments. They aren’t ancillary to the story’s success, but they don’t drive it either. They make for a beautiful trip, but not always an interesting one.Originally Pubished at: David Bird


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DC Women Kicking Ass: Cartoon Network DC Nation Commercial Gives a Peek at New Offerings

DC Women Kicking Ass: Cartoon Network DC Nation Commercial Gives a Peek at New Offerings

By xaraan in Blog on November 12, 2011

DC Women Kicking Ass: Cartoon Network DC Nation Commercial Gives a Peek at New Offerings: dcwomenkickingass: During the premiere of the new Green Lantern on Cartoon Network this evening viewers were show a sneak peek at the upcoming DC Nation block of shows in a commercial that gave glimpses of a variety of content. Most intriguing was what appeared to be footage from the live action Blue Beetle test… Authors: xaraanRead more http://theouthouseblog.tumblr.com/post/12681627669

Two By Jonathan Case

Two By Jonathan Case

By David Bird in Blog on November 7, 2011

I’ve been posting weekly film reviews for the last couple of months, but I am going back to comics this week to share two very good books.Dear CreatureWritten by Jonathan Case, Art by Jonathan CasePublished by Tor Books, 2011It’s a tale as old as time. A hormonally-charged-teenager eating mutant sea monster falls in love with a crazy shut in and the whole world, well, okay, maybe it’s not that conventional a story. Grue (short for gruesome?) is a mutated sea monster, who lives in a sunken sub with a chorus a wise-cracking crabs. The crabs are pretty happy, Grue provides them with a steady diet of delicious teen flesh to feast on, but Grue himself is unsatisfied. Something is missing from his life and he finds it in the pages of Shakespeare’s plays, which have been torn out, put into cola bottles, and thrown into the deep. Tracing the origin of these bottles leads him to the sorry story of two Italian sisters, the sheriff who loves one of them, and the boy blamed for the death’s caused by Grue’s appetite. Can Grue overcome his own nature and make everything right? Well, the course of true love never did run smooth.This is Jonathan Case’s debut (almost) and it’s a very strong one. His story is fun, engaging, quirky, and emotionally true. His art is equally good, with a tone that recalls the macabre tales that used to be common place before superheroes ate American comics. You have to wonder what they’re putting in the water in Portland to produce newcomers this accomplished. I enjoyed it so much, I bumped his other new book to the top of my ‘to read’ pile.Green River Killer: A True Detective StoryWritten by Jeff Jenson, Art by Jonathan CasePublished by Dark Horse, 2011Coming out just a month before Dear Creature, Green River Killer: A True Detective Story is a very different book. Growing up in British Columbia all our American TV channels came out of Seattle, so I’ve long been familiar with one of the Northwest’s most notorious serial killers, but I have to admit I knew nothing of the circumstances of his capture. The book is a collaboration with writer Jeff Jenson, who has a unique connection to the case: his father was the lead detective. In fact, there were times when he was the only detective on the case. Tom Jenson spent most of his career trying to find the killer of over forty women, and finally managed to catch him utilizing the latest developments in genetic research. It was a long, wearying journey that culminated in six month period in which the killer worked with police to locate victims and explain his motivations, in a deal to escape the death penalty.I don’t know anything of the nature of their collaboration, but Jenson and Case have put out a serious and compelling work. It focuses on Tom Jenson and how the case impacted his life. As a character in his own life’s story, he comes across as strong, dedicated, and very real. As his son points out, the victims were prostitutes, but they were also daughters, sisters, and mothers and they deserved someone like Tom Jenson, who wouldn’t quit until they had justice. The tone of Case’s art is very different from Creature’s. The book doesn’t concentrate on the violence, but its effects and the day to day frustrations of decades of hard work. Not an easy thing to capture in a visually compelling manner, but Case pulls it off again.Two very rewarding reads.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

Two By Jonathan Case

Two By Jonathan Case

By David Bird in Blog on November 7, 2011

I’ve been posting weekly film reviews for the last couple of months, but I am going back to comics this week to share two very good books.Dear CreatureWritten by Jonathan Case, Art by Jonathan CasePublished by Tor Books, 2011It’s a tale as old as time. A hormonally-charged-teenager eating mutant sea monster falls in love with a crazy shut in and the whole world, well, okay, maybe it’s not that conventional a story. Grue (short for gruesome?) is a mutated sea monster, who lives in a sunken sub with a chorus a wise-cracking crabs. The crabs are pretty happy, Grue provides them with a steady diet of delicious teen flesh to feast on, but Grue himself is unsatisfied. Something is missing from his life and he finds it in the pages of Shakespeare’s plays, which have been torn out, put into cola bottles, and thrown into the deep. Tracing the origin of these bottles leads him to the sorry story of two Italian sisters, the sheriff who loves one of them, and the boy blamed for the death’s caused by Grue’s appetite. Can Grue overcome his own nature and make everything right? Well, the course of true love never did run smooth.This is Jonathan Case’s debut (almost) and it’s a very strong one. His story is fun, engaging, quirky, and emotionally true. His art is equally good, with a tone that recalls the macabre tales that used to be common place before superheroes ate American comics. You have to wonder what they’re putting in the water in Portland to produce newcomers this accomplished. I enjoyed it so much, I bumped his other new book to the top of my ‘to read’ pile.Green River Killer: A True Detective StoryWritten by Jeff Jenson, Art by Jonathan CasePublished by Dark Horse, 2011Coming out just a month before Dear Creature, Green River Killer: A True Detective Story is a very different book. Growing up in British Columbia all our American TV channels came out of Seattle, so I’ve long been familiar with one of the Northwest’s most notorious serial killers, but I have to admit I knew nothing of the circumstances of his capture. The book is a collaboration with writer Jeff Jenson, who has a unique connection to the case: his father was the lead detective. In fact, there were times when he was the only detective on the case. Tom Jenson spent most of his career trying to find the killer of over forty women, and finally managed to catch him utilizing the latest developments in genetic research. It was a long, wearying journey that culminated in six month period in which the killer worked with police to locate victims and explain his motivations, in a deal to escape the death penalty.I don’t know anything of the nature of their collaboration, but Jenson and Case have put out a serious and compelling work. It focuses on Tom Jenson and how the case impacted his life. As a character in his own life’s story, he comes across as strong, dedicated, and very real. As his son points out, the victims were prostitutes, but they were also daughters, sisters, and mothers and they deserved someone like Tom Jenson, who wouldn’t quit until they had justice. The tone of Case’s art is very different from Creature’s. The book doesn’t concentrate on the violence, but its effects and the day to day frustrations of decades of hard work. Not an easy thing to capture in a visually compelling manner, but Case pulls it off again.Two very rewarding reads.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

the-epimethean-boy: dcu: Way to go DC!!!  Dan Didio must be...

the-epimethean-boy: dcu: Way to go DC!!!  Dan Didio must be...

By xaraan in Blog on November 6, 2011

the-epimethean-boy: dcu: Way to go DC!!!  Dan Didio must be the happiest little troll king ever. Good for you guys!. Authors: xaraanRead more http://theouthouseblog.tumblr.com/post/12431083729

Over 300 original pieces of insanity by Pedram

Over 300 original pieces of insanity by Pedram

By pedi in Blog on November 4, 2011

CHARACTER AND CREATURE PORTRAITS Over 300 original pieces of insanity by Pedram Shohadai (Excerpt from PetraGallerie.com) The ones who say they are sane are the ones you should be worried about. When works like Pedran Shohadai’s talents hit the page with such detail, passion and character are considered insane then the question of what is normal becomes more complex. If you’re a fan of the arts you’ll sit there with drool and wonder of how it was done…If you’re an artist you’ll sit there with drool and wonder of how you could do it too. Pedram’s work is humbling on many fronts. From 1 to 3, he is a renaissance man of the D’s. November 26, 2011 marks the opening date of a four week show featuring hundreds of fantastic character and creature portrait illustrations by Motion Pictures Visual Effects and Comic Book Artist, Pedram Shohadai (www.pedrams.com). Pedram’s career in the visual arts has spanned two decades and various entertainment platforms including comics, advertising, television, interactive games, internet, and feature films, for such iconic characters, properties and brands from Marvel Comics’ Spider-man and Tim Burton’s Alice In Wonderland, to Microsoft and Chase. This vast collection of Pedram’s illustrations began in 2006 as 1″x2″ post-it “doodles” created during countless computer “render time” periods taking place on multitudes of projects. Now, this collection has grown to include over 300 unique and inspiring fully rendered portraits of extraordinary characters and creatures – ranging in size and realistic detail, including 1″x2″ ball point pen and 3″x3″ ink on post-its, to 5′ acrylic paintings on boards – all displayed at Petra Gallerie in South Beverly Hills! LAST SATURDAYS Saturday November 26, 2011 CHARACTER AND CREATURE PORTRAITS Over 300 original pieces of insanity by Pedram Shohadai 1149 & 1151 s. robertson blvd. soro la ca 90035 8 ‘TILL LATE 21 AND OVER FREE ADMISSION $20 NIGHTLY SOCIAL CLUB MEMBERSHIP GETS YOU FOOD AND DRINKS PLUS MORE ALL NIGHT! visit: Petra Gallerie fo’ mo’ info’ TweetAuthors: pediRead more http://pedrams.me/wp/2011/11/over-300-original-pieces-of-insanity-by-pedram/

timetravelandrocketpoweredapes: Spidey by Javier Burgos...

timetravelandrocketpoweredapes: Spidey by Javier Burgos...

By xaraan in Blog on November 4, 2011

timetravelandrocketpoweredapes: Spidey by Javier Burgos Arroyo Artist: deviantart / twitter Authors: xaraanRead more http://theouthouseblog.tumblr.com/post/12334391624


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Why I Love Comics In episode #57 of the podcast, Eric brings...

Why I Love Comics In episode #57 of the podcast, Eric brings...

By xaraan in Blog on November 4, 2011

Why I Love Comics In episode #57 of the podcast, Eric brings back the round table for the first time since right before NYCC! He’s joined by Jeremy Wiggins and new member of the roundtable Jason Marnocha aka Lord Jazor of youtube voice acting fame. The guys discuss cosplay, their favorite voice actors, the Batman universe in general, dream roles, what Jeremy is reading and just so much more all while combating lapses in knowledge on Eric’s part and a faulty firefox! So pull up a chair and join us for another edition of the Why I Love Comics podcast! http://www.youtube.com/user/LordJazor - Jazor’s official youtube page! http://www.youtube.com/user/GeektressGalore - Geektress (who is extremely talented an awesome by the way) http://www.youtube.com/user/mgalusic - Mike Galusick’s very awesome fan films which recently had an appearance by Jazor! http://www.youtube.com/user/FSoundStudios - Jake is hilarious and has a british accent, watch his videos! http://www.youtube.com/user/TallestSilver - Silver’s youtube! http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kit-n-Silver/168391156551594 - Kit and Silver’s fanpage! http://www.youtube.com/user/DCAbridgedUniverse - Must watch, completely hilarious! Also be sure and check out the “Jakeson podcast” on itunes! Jake and Jazor are hilarious when bouncing off each other. http://podcastmachine.com/podcasts/9586 As usual follow me on twitter (http://twitter.com/#!/EricRatcliffe) like the show on facebook (www.facebook.com/whyilovecomics) and check out my awesome webcomic (www.newcomicday.net) and don’t forget to subscribe/write a review on itunes!Also check out the Kirby Krackle, official houseband of the podcast! (http://www.kirbykracklemusic.com/)Authors: xaraanRead more http://theouthouseblog.tumblr.com/post/12329318932

A night at the SpacePort

A night at the SpacePort

By pedi in Blog on November 3, 2011

TweetAuthors: pediRead more http://pedrams.me/wp/2011/11/a-night-at-the-spaceport/

photojojo: Adorable subjects in striking compositions. Here’s...

photojojo: Adorable subjects in striking compositions. Here’s...

By xaraan in Blog on November 1, 2011

photojojo: Adorable subjects in striking compositions. Here’s another amazing portrait series featuring trick or treaters. Halloween in Harlem by Amy Stein. via Art Sponge Authors: xaraanRead more http://theouthouseblog.tumblr.com/post/12181017723

The only day I am normal ;)

The only day I am normal ;)

By pedi in Blog on October 31, 2011

Happy Halloween! TweetAuthors: pediRead more http://pedrams.me/wp/2011/10/the-only-day-i-am-normal/

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