Monday, December 22, 2014 • Morning Edition • "Where keepin' it real goes wrong."
Bitácora - Hugo Alegre (Centro Colich)

Bitácora - Hugo Alegre (Centro Colich)

By Arion in Blog on September 14, 2012

Follow You Follow Me (1979)Directed by Roger Lambert Peter and Joseph are best mates, they go to the same high school and they see each other often after class. Until parental pressure puts the friendship on the brink of collapse.The true nature of the boys relationship is never made clear, Peter is an outgoing and popular student, whereas Joseph is shy and goes unnoticed by his peers. Peter has expressed once and again his interest in girls, but Joseph seems to be preoccupied with something else. When the two boys are kissing girls at the same time, Joseph seems uneasy when it's his turn to kiss his date. Nonetheless, these subtle differences do not prevent them from sharing intimate moments. For example, when Joseph asks Peter the meaning of "wanker", his friends proceeds to not only explain but also provide him with some adult magazines. As they discuss about masturbation one thing remains clear: fantasy is the motor behind all masturbatory acts. Both kids start confessing what it is that arouses them, and they even describe their fantasies to each other. my sketch / homage for one of my friends (fan of Jae Lee's Dark Tower)/ mi boceto / homenaje para un amigo (fan de Dark Tower de Jae Lee)This shouldn't come as a surprise, as Foucault has explained at length in his History of Sexuality, Victorian society would seek to forbid and eradicate masturbation because it was an unnecessary expenditure of energy and especially of thoughts. Imagination always takes part during masturbation, and the fantasmatic scenarios of self-pleasuring were simply deemed as morally reprehensible and ultimately injurious.Unlike other productions, Roger Lambert's short film never deals directly with the homosexual subject. The boys' parents have problems with banks and factories, respectively, and that's the reason why they decide to put an end to their children's friendship. The homoerotic subtext here is merely hinted at, as the scene in which Joseph wakes up in the middle of the night, with tears in his eyes, and gets dressed to visit his friend Peter. He has a proposal for Peter: to run away together. But can they really escape from their parents, id est, from the symbolic imperative to always uphold the heterosexual normativity?______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Hugo AlegreAyer en la noche se inauguró “Bitácora”, fascinante muestra de Hugo Alegre, artista de gran trayectoria que, en esta ocasión, plantea un vínculo dialógico y pictórico entre 1879 y 2012.  La Guerra del Pacífico es representada con una minuciosa reproducción histórica que nos hace reflexionar sobre el pasado y el presente. Hace medio año, más o menos, recuerdo que me quedé conversando con Hugo más de una hora en una conocida galería barranquina, y en la conversación me habló sobre los orígenes de esta muestra: un viaje suyo a Chile, cuatro décadas atrás, cuando no tenía reparos en ponerse a mochilear; allí, en algún momento se extravió en una carretera interprovincial nada transitada. Se quedó dormido, y entre sueños creyó escuchar los pasos de los soldados chilenos y peruanos, que desde el siglo XIX seguían anclados en algún ínclito combate. Y lo cierto es que para algunos el eco de la guerra con Chile resuena hasta nuestros días.  Hugo AlegreHugo ha combinado preciosas imágenes, de corte realista, con textos, en prosa o en verso, que aluden al conflicto. Es la primera muestra individual de Hugo que tengo la suerte de haber visitado, y quedé encantado por la sutileza de sus colores, por sus trazos finos y bien ejecutados, por sus personajes, por la combinación entre lo visual y lo escrito. Sin duda, una muestra imprescindible que todos deberían visitar. Está hasta la primera semana de octubre en el Centro Colich (Jirón Colina 110, Barranco).Tratándose de Hugo, por supuesto, el Centro Colich estuvo repleto de gente en la inauguración. Además de Hugo estaba Carmen Alegre, a quien saludé apenas llegué. También pude encontrarme con asiduos concurrentes del circuito artístico limeño como Marcos Palacios, Paola Tejada, Julio Garay, José Medina, Paloma Reaño Hurtado, etc. Simultáneamente también se inauguraron las interesantísimas muestras de Francisco Salomón (fotografía) y “El increíble ruido” de Muriel Holguín (pintura). Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/09/bitacora-hugo-alegre-centro-colich.html

The Gathering vol. 14: The Infinite Abyss - Arcadio Bolaños Acevedo

The Gathering vol. 14: The Infinite Abyss - Arcadio Bolaños Acevedo

By Arion in Blog on September 12, 2012

Leonardo Gonzalez (cover / portada) I’m very proud of this recent horror volume, not only for its high level of quality but also because this is a bit of a historical moment for me. In this issue you will find my first collaboration with artist extraordinaire Juan Alarcón. We also have a 3 page story in Romance (out on November 2012), a 6 page full color story in Tales of the Abyss (2013), GrayHaven’s first title exclusively dedicated to horror and a 5 page story in the Erotica one-shot (2013). And that’s just the beginning. I feel incredibly lucky for having found such a talented artist and every time I look at his pages I’m amazed.But we are here to talk about the comic book I’m holding in my hands right now. Let’s start with the absolutely wonderful cover by Leonardo Gonzalez, an artist that had already impressed me in The Gathering vol. 9 (February 2012). Leonardo provides us with a detailed and careful rendering of a rotting corpse, his style is similar to masters such as Bernie Wrightson, but the design of the page resembles the covers of Attila Futaki for Severed. So yes, this is a book that you can judge by its cover.“Prepared” written by Marc Lombardi and illustrated by cover artist Leonardo Gonzalez is a great example of humor in a world full of zombies, perhaps more akin to Zombieland than Night of the Living Dead, this is a tale of witty dialogues and great visuals. Then comes “Doppleganger” written by Tatiana Christian with art by Courtney Thomas, a most singular depiction of a parallel world in which mirrors are forbidden and secret horrors lurks in every reflected image. I hope to see more from these girls in future issues. “The Devil and Bobby Jones” is one of my personal favorites. In only 3 pages Brad Nelson creates suspense and intrigue in equal measures, when a boy’s family starts disappearing, there can only be one explanation… or perhaps more than one. The supernatural elements are greatly conveyed by Brian Defferding, an artist who has proved time and time again his capacity to come up with innovative images. Arcadio Bolaños (script / guión) & Juan Alarcón (art / arte) As a fan of TV series like Dexter and films like American Psycho, I found “Portrait of a Serial Killer” both fascinating and poignant. Jason Snyder creates the same intensity one would expect from, say, Dexter, by delving into the psychology of a serial killer, I don’t know if it’s in Jason’s plans to write more stories about this character, but I’d surely like to see that. Michael Sumislaski’s pencils here are as sharp as ever. Two pages stories are hard to write, but Ray Goldfield does it wonderfully in “Bump in the Night”, which includes a very peculiar twist (which I won’t spoil) to the usual situation of kids scared of monsters under their bed. Oh, and Chris Page draws for us some creepy monsters too.Of course, it wouldn’t be appropriate for me to review my own story, “The Outsider”, so I’ll let our favorite British reviewer (Glenn Matchett AKA The Doctor) and also editor of GrayHaven to do the work for me: “Regular Gathering contributor Arcadio Bolaños takes a break from art duties (mostly to cram in all my dialogue for Dark, poor sod) and turns his writing talents to a story about 3 friends who discover a criminal trapped in a well. They are faced with the choice to help her or wait until she dies so they can take the money later. They make a poor choice that is sure to have horrible repercussions for them in the future. It's a lead in to a story in our upcoming Abyss ongoing and very much leaves the reader wanting more in the final panels. Revenge is a big thing in horror movies with supernatural creatures often being motivated to get their own back on those who wronged them. This story I feel perfectly taps into this genre and I can't wait for everyone to see what Arcadio and artist Juan Alarcon have up their sleeves. While on the art I think it’s spectacular and is definitely one of the best looking stories we've ever had. It draws you in early and doesn't let go and seeing it in colour in Abyss will only make it better”. THANKS Glenn, I really appreciate that!“The Tunnel Home” by Westhoff and Ornelas has a very interesting development. A curious boy defies his mother’s orders and goes through a sinister tunnel on his way back home. What kind of horror lurks in the tunnel? And, also, what kind of threat is waiting for the boy at home? “Undead Again” by Matthew Louden (writer) and Jazel Riley (penciler / inker) presents dead people rising from their graves in a quotidian and strangely amusing context. “The Glass Eye” by writer / editor Erica Heflin and regular cover artist Amanda Rachels is a horror story that starts in a very urban setting: a young boy is picked up by his parents after an unfortunate incident with the local police. His father, an old man with a glass eye, is willing to hurt the boy so he won’t “disrespect” the family name again; but what can this man do with the kid’s defenseless body? How will he keep a (glass) eye on him? I won’t spoil the ending but let’s just say that these ladies sure know how to strike fear into the reader’s heart.Good old Glenn Matchett does horror again in “Hospital Visit”, illustrated by George Amaru. This feels like a horror film from the opening frames. A couple of teenagers enter into an abandoned hospital, they each carry a flashlight (or torch as the British would say) and nothing else. But, of course, they’ll need so much more than that if they want to escape alive from this haunted hospital. Great job Glenn and George! And at last, but certainly not least, we have the extraordinary “Preserved”, with a script by Elena Andrews and art by David Aspmo. A 14-year-old boy is forced to give blood to his father on a regular basis, until the teenager is fed up and prepares a lethal trap for his progenitor. Elena Andrews creates quite a creepy character and provides us with a lot of tension in these 4 pages; and David Aspmo’s art is magnificent, I love his level of details, his dark atmospheres, his haunting shadows, everything he does on the page looks stunning. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ David AspmoEstoy muy orgulloso de este reciente volumen de terror, no sólo por su alto nivel de calidad sino también porque este es un momento histórico para mí. En este número, encontrarán mi primera colaboración con el extraordinario artista Juan Alarcón. También tenemos una historia de 3 páginas en Romance (que saldrá en noviembre de 2012), 6 páginas a todo color en Tales of the Abyss (2013), el primer título de GrayHaven dedicado exclusivamente al terror y una historia de 5 páginas en el especial Erótico (2013). Y eso es sólo el comienzo. Me siento increíblemente afortunado por haber encontrado un artista tan talentoso y cada vez que veo sus páginas me asombro.Pero estamos aquí para hablar sobre el cómic que estoy sujetando en mis manos. Empecemos con la portada absolutamente maravillosa de Leonardo Gonzalez, un artista que ya me había impresionado en The Gathering vol. 9 (febrero 2012). Leonardo nos proporciona una imagen cuidadosamente detallada de un cuerpo putrefacto, su estilo es similar al de maestros como Bernie Wrightson, pero el diseño de la página se asemeja a las portadas de Attila Futaki para Severed. Así que en este caso sí se puede juzgar al libro por su portada.“Prepared” escrito por Marc Lombardi e ilustrado por el portadista Leonardo Gonzalez  es un gran ejemplo de humor en un mundo lleno de zombis, tal vez más similar a "Zombieland" que a "Night of the Living Dead", esta es una historia de diálogos ingeniosos e imágenes grandiosas. Luego llega “Doppleganger” escrito por Tatiana Christian con arte de Courtney Thomas, en un singular enfoque de un mundo paralelo en el que los espejos están prohibidos y en donde el horror acecha en cada imagen reflejada. Espero ver más de estas chicas en futuros números. “The Devil and Bobby Jones” es, personalmente, uno de mis favoritos. En sólo 3 páginas Brad Nelson crea suspenso e intriga en iguales medidas, cuando la familia de un niño empieza a desaparecer, sólo hay una explicación... tal vez más de una. Los elementos sobrenaturales están muy bien expresados por Brian Defferding, un artista que ha demostrado una y otra vez su capacidad para innovarse. Como fan de series de televisión como "Dexter" y películas como "American Psycho", pienso que “Portrait of a Serial Killer” es fascinante y sugerente. Jason Snyder crea la misma intensidad que uno esperaría, digamos, en Dexter, al hurgar en la psicología de un asesino en serie. No sé si está en los planes de Jason escribir más historias sobre este personaje, pero me encantaría que así sea. Los lápices de Michael Sumislaski siguen aquí tan afilados como siempre. Las historias de dos páginas son difíciles de escribir, pero Ray Goldfield lo consigue maravillosamente en “Bump in the Night”, que incluye un peculiar giro argumental a la habitual situación de los niños que tienen miedo al monstruo de debajo de la cama. Oh, y Chris Page dibuja unos buenos monstruos. my sketch / homage for one of my friends (fan of Jae Lee's Dark Tower) / mi boceto / homenaje para un amigo (fan de Dark Tower de Jae Lee)Desde luego, no sería apropiado que reseñara mi propia historia, “The Outsider”, así que dejaré que nuestro reseñista británico favorito (Glenn Matchett alias The Doctor) y también editor de GrayHaven hago el trabajo por mí: "Arcadio Bolaños, habitual contribuyente de The Gathering, se toma una pausa de sus deberes artísticos (sobre todo para embutir todo mis diálogos para "Dark", pobre tipo) y vuelca su talento como escritor en una historia sobre 3 amigos que descubren a una criminal atrapada en un pozo. Enfrentan la opción de ayudarla o esperar a que se muera para poder llevarse el dinero. Toman una mala decisión que seguro tendrá horribles repercusiones para ellos en el futuro. Es la primera parte de una historia para nuestro nuevo título Abyss y deja al lector deseoso de ver qué sucede tras las viñetas finales. La venganza es un gran tema del cine de terror con criaturas sobrenaturales que a menudo son motivadas por el deseo de vengarse de aquellos que les hicieron una mala jugada. Siento que esta historia aborda perfectamente este género y no puedo esperar a ver lo que Arcadio y el artista Juan Alarcón tienen bajo la manga. Creo que el arte es espectacular y es definitivamente una de las historias que mejor se ve de las que hemos tenido alguna vez. Te atrapa desde el inicio y no te suelta, y ver esto en color en Abyss será incluso mejor". ¡GRACIAS Glenn!“The Tunnel Home” de Westhoff y Ornelas se desarrolla de manera interesante. Un chico curioso desafía las órdenes de su madre y entra a un siniestro túnel camino a casa. ¿Qué clase de horror acecha en el túnel? ¿Y qué amenaza espera al muchachito en su hogar? “Undead Again” de Matthew Louden (escritor) y Jazel Riley (dibujante) presenta muertos que salen de sus tumbas en un contexto cotidiano y extrañamente divertido. “The Glass Eye” de la escritora / editora Erica Heflin and habitual portadista Amanda Rachels es una historia de terror que empieza en un escenario urbano: un jovencito es recogido por sus padres luego de un incidente con la policía local. Su padre, un viejo con un ojo de vidrio, está deseoso de hacerle daño para que no vuelva a "arruinar" el apellido familiar; pero ¿qué hará este hombre con el indefenso cuerpo del chiquillo? No arruinaré la sorpresa final, pero sólo digamos que estas famas saben cómo causar miedo en el corazón del lector.El bueno de Glenn Matchett regresa al terror de nuevo con “Hospital Visit”, ilustrado por George Amaru.Desde las primeras viñetas, se siente como una película de terror. Un par de adolescentes entran a un hospital abandonado, lo único que tienen son linternas (o 'antorchas' en británico). Pero, por supuesto, necesitarán mucho más que eso si quieren escapar con vida de este hospital condenado. ¡Gran trabajo Glenn y George! Y finalmente, tenemos el extraordinario “Preserved”, con guión de Elena Andrews y arte de David Aspmo. Un chico de 14 años es obligado a darle sangre a su padre con frecuencia, hasta que el adolescnete se harta y prepara una letal trampa para su progenitor. Elena Andrews crea un personaje siniestro y genera mucha tensión en sus 4 páginas; y el arte de David Aspmo es magnífico, me encanta su nivel de detalles, sus atmósferas oscuras, sus sombras, todo lo que hace en la página se ve estupendo.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/09/the-gathering-vol-14-infinite-abyss.html

SHOOT - Warren Ellis Phil Jimenez

SHOOT - Warren Ellis Phil Jimenez

By Arion in Blog on September 9, 2012

Tim Bradstreet (cover / portada)Violence has been with us since the dawn of civilization. Our primordial nature and our most basic instincts, however, cannot explain a phenomenon that has been affecting the United States for the past 20 years: school shootings and a murder-suicide modus operandi that has baffled psychologists and specialists throughout the world. What goes on in the mind of a teenager when he decides to murder his classmates and then kill himself? Certainly, violence in the past would always serve some sort of purpose. But what we have seen in American high schools seems to defy reason. Is there even a semblance of purpose in the act of killing others and then committing suicide? Or isn’t it rather an emphasis on purposelessness, on unrestrained hatred, on irrationality at its worst?When Warren Ellis started writing Hellblazer, he probably asked himself the same questions. The killing spree in schools had increased from the 80s to the 90s, and in 1998, Warren decided that it was time to take John Constantine away from his usual fracas with demons and supernatural menaces to tackle on a very real situation.  High school student kills a classmate and then commits suicide /un estudiante de secundaria mata a otro alumno y luego se suicida As Penny Carnes investigates the shocking child-on-child slayings and prepares a report for a Senate hearing, she soon feels frustrated. There are no answers, no motives: nothing can explain this unprecedented manifestation of violence. Why is it that in 1995, a 16 year turns into a homicide and then kills himself in Blackville-Hilda High School? Why is it that every year there are more similar cases? Penny Carnes has no answers, but John Constantine does. Ellis wrote SHOOT just before the Columbine massacre and back then DC / Vertigo editors decided it was too strong a story to be published, even though Phil Jimenez had already illustrated the story. A decade later, this decision was reversed and SHOOT finally saw the light of day after 10 years of censorship. And I applaud Vertigo for finally publishing it because I consider SHOOT one of the best standalone issues I’ve read in my life. Certainly everyone remembers the Columbine massacre (July 1999), in which two teenagers were responsible for the deaths of 15 people before ending their own lives. The same happened in the Red Lake massacre in 2005, in which an underage student killed 8 people before committing suicide or in the Red Lion Area Junior High School shooting (the shooter was 14, the MO was the same, killing others and then killing himself) and so on. A few years ago, Michael Moore tried to share with the public some of his insights in “Bowling for Columbine” a documentary that focused on gun legislations, the National Rifle Association and the inherent violence in the American way of life. researching child-on-child slayings / investigando asesinatos entre chicos Warren Ellis also analyzes the arguments brought on by the media at the time. Everyone needed someone or something to blame. For some, allegedly Satanist musicians such as Marilyn Manson were to be blamed, for others it was computer games or horror movies. Penny Carnes tries to come up with an answer. She hopes that she can identify the problem and get rid of it. But she can’t. That’s when Constantine shows up and explains to her that there isn’t a magical solution. This isn’t a situation that can be fixed as quickly and as efficiently as the US senate demands.For John Constantine the problem lies deep within us, as a culture. Just like Gus Van Sant proves in his magnificent film “Elephant”, today it’s easier to buy a gun and bullets than to find the opportunity to kiss someone else. One of the most unforgettable moments in “Elephant” takes place when the two soon-to-be killers confess to each other that they are virgins and have never even kissed anyone, and yet, they’re ready to kill others and then kill themselves (just as it happened in the Columbine massacre). As Constantine explains, ours is “a world where kids actually go to special classes to learn to recognize real emotions and body language because they were raised by the television”. I would add that after 10 years, we have found even more ways to replace human interaction with technology. Nowadays, people are obsessed with pages like Facebook, which is nothing more than an attempt to fill in an existential void, but substituting relationships for hundreds of “friends” and “likes” doesn’t improve one’s life. Isolation, lack of emotions and selfishness seem to be the guidelines of the 21st century.When I read SHOOT two years ago my heart stopped for a minute in the last 3 pages. There is an extremely dramatic moment that ultimately explodes in the last frame. Warren Ellis makes you feel as if someone had died in front of your eyes. You feel what the high school kid about to die is feeling, and it is a horrendous realization. For an instant, you lose faith in humankind. And then, as you put the book away, you start thinking about all the horrible and unexplainable things that happen in real life. And you realize that even if none of that makes sense, you can still cling to your feelings, break out of your isolation and start caring a little bit more about the world around you. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Why school shootings are so frequent in the US? / ¿Por qué las matanzas en colegios son tan comunes en USA? La violencia ha estado con nosotros desde el alba de la civilización. Sin embargo, nuestra naturaleza primordial y nuestros instintos básicos no pueden explicar un fenómeno que ha estado afectando a los Estados Unidos en los últimos 20 años: las matanzas en los colegios y un modus operandi de asesinato-suicidio que mantiene absortos a todos los psicólogos y especialistas. ¿Qué sucede en la mente de un adolescente cuando decide asesinar a sus compañeros de clase y luego matarse a sí mismo?Ciertamente, la violencia en el pasado siempre habría tenido algún tipo de propósito. Pero lo que hemos visto en las secundarias norteamericanas desafía la razón. ¿Hay al menos algún rastro de propósito en el acto de matar a otros y luego suicidarse? ¿O no es esto, más bien, un énfasis en el despropósito, en el odio desatado, en el peor tipo de irracionalidad?Cuando Warren Ellis empezó a escribir Hellblazer, probablemente se planteó las mismas preguntas. La ola de asesinatos en los colegios había aumentado desde los 80 hasta los 90, y en 1998, Warren decidió que era momento de apartar a John Constantine de sus habituales escaramuzas con demonios y amenazas sobrenaturales para abordar una situación muy real.Mientras Penny Carnes investiga los impactantes asesinatos entre chicos y prepara su reporte para una audiencia del senado, se siente frustrada. No hay respuestas ni motivos: nada puede explicar esta manifestación de violencia sin precedentes. ¿Por qué en 1995, un estudiante de 16 años se convierte en un homicida que luego acaba con su vida en Blackville-Hilda High School? ¿Por qué cada año hay más casos similares? Penny Carnes no tiene respuestas, pero John Constantine sí las tiene.Ellis escribió “Shoot” justo antes de la masacre de Columbine y en ese entones los editores de DC / Vertigo decidieron que la historia era demasiado fuerte para ser publicada, incluso aunque Phil Jimenez ya había terminado de ilustrarla. Una década después, esta decisión fue revertida y "Shoot" salió a la luz luego de años de censura. Y aplaudo a Vertigo por publicarla finalmente porque considero que "Shoot" es una de las mejores historias autoconclusivas que he leído en mi vida. John Constantine & Penny CarnesCiertamente, todos recordarán la masacre de Columbine (julio de 1999), en la que dos adolescentes fueron responsables de las muertes de 15 personas antes de acabar con sus propias vidas. Lo mismo sucedió en la masacre de Red Lake el 2005, en la que un estudiante menor de edad mató a 8 personas antes de cometer suicidio o en la matanza de Red Lion Area Junior High School (el culpable tenía 14 años y luego de causar las muertes de otros termina suicidándose), y así sucesivamente. Hace algunos años, Michael Moore intentó compartir con el público su punto de vista en “Bowling for Columbine” un documental que se enfocaba en la legislación sobre armas, la Asociación Nacional del Rifle y la violencia inherente al estilo de vida norteamericano.Warren Ellis también analiza los argumentos de los medios en ese momento. Todos necesitaban a alguien o algo que culpar. Para algunos, la culpa recaía en cantantes supuestamente satánicos como Marilyn Manson, para otros en los juegos de computadora o las películas de terror. Penny Carnes intenta encontrar una respuesta. Su esperanza es identificar el problema para poder eliminarlo. Pero no puede. Entonces Constantine aparece y le explica que no hay una solución mágica. Esta no es una situación que puede ser arreglada rápida y eficientemente, como exige el senado.Para John Constantine el problema está en nosotros, en nuestra cultura. Tal como lo demuestra Gus Van Sant en su magnífico film “Elephant”, hoy en día es más fácil comprar armas y balas que encontrar la oportunidad para besar a alguien. Uno de los más inolvidables momentos de "Elephant" sucede cuando los dos futuros homicidas se confiesan mutuamente que son vírgenes y que ni siquiera han besado a alguien, y no obstante, están preparados para matar a otros y luego matarse a sí mismos (como sucedió en la masacre de Columbine).Constantine explica que el nuestro es "un mundo en el que los chicos necesitan ir a clases especiales para aprender a reconocer emociones reales y el lenguaje corporal porque han sido educados por un televisor". Agregaría que, 10 años después, hemos encontrado incluso más maneras de reemplazar la interacción humana con tecnología. Actualmente, la gente se obsesiona por páginas como Facebook, que no es otra cosa que un intento por llenar el vacío existencial, pero sustituir relaciones con centenares de "amigos" o "me gusta" no le mejora la vida a nadie. El aislamiento, la ausencia de emociones y el egoísmo parecen definir al siglo XXI.Cuando leí "Shoot" hace dos años mi corazón se detuvo por un minuto en las últimas 3 páginas. Hay un momento extremadamente dramático que estalla magistralmente en la última viñeta. Warren Ellis te hace sentir como si alguien hubiese muerto frente a ti. Y sientes lo que está sintiendo el chiquillo de secundaria a punto de morir, y la sensación es horrenda. Por un instante, pierdes la fe en la humanidad. Y luego, cuando sueltas el cómic, empiezas a pensar en todas las cosas horribles e inexplicables que suceden en la vida real. Y te das cuenta que aunque no tengan sentido, todavía puedes aferrarte a tus sentimientos, salir de tu aislamiento y empezar a querer un poco más el mundo que te rodea.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/09/shoot-warren-ellis-phil-jimenez.html

Antropofagia cultural: vanguardias modernistas - Dédalo

Antropofagia cultural: vanguardias modernistas - Dédalo

By Arion in Blog on September 7, 2012

Bennys Gym (2007)Directed by Lisa Marie GamlemPerhaps aggression is inherent to every human being, it’s an intrinsic desire of hurting others by no other reason than the opportunity to do so. Alfred is a teenager ostracized by other kids, he gets bullied all the time by Benny and his friends, who beat him up and pee on his notebook. Why is it that these youngsters experience such joy by torturing a defenseless boy? The boys attend the same high school but no education system can prevent what goes on here. Why? Because there is an education that pertains to the norm, to the word (id est, the reality); but there is always something else, something deep that cannot be channeled through the word (id est, the real). It’s often thought that the first one is more than enough for the educative system and that’s a blatant mistake. The teacher and the board cannot connect with the student. Reason –rationality- is not enough to deal with the pre-rational magma that governs our impulses and prevents us from becoming what we want to be, even if we don’t know what that is.When Benny is alone and spends time with Alfred, he is a different lad. The high school bully shares his secrets, his fears and hopes with the unpopular kid. It’s no surprise that certain familial dynamics can create a vicious circle (of poverty, of violence, etc.), Benny’s violent father physically punishes his son, not unlike the way Benny does it with other kids in school. An outlandish bond takes place between them. Perhaps, together, isolated from the world and society, from reality, they gain access to the real, that place in which desire is born. Michele del CampoIn high school, Benny keeps ignoring Alfred, but when they’re together everything is different. One night, Benny suggests that he could have sexual intercourse with Alfred, and kisses him passionately. Alfred acts surprised but had been longing for such a moment since day one. Nevertheless desire cannot guarantee a safe-conduct through adolescence… and soon, Benny’s abusive friends savagely take it out on Alfred, they even try to drown him in the lake. Benny is a witness to all that, but he finds himself exscinded. Should he attempt to rescue his friend he would expose himself before the eyes of the others. But then, the possibility of losing Alfred forever is more than he can bear.  This Norwegian short film about abuse and marginality demonstrates that youth’s problems are the same everywhere in the globe, and that as a society we’re failing to keep things balanced. Our focus, as usual, goes to reality and not to the Lacanian real.http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1059893/reviews______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The Gathering vol. 14Ayer en la noche se llevó a cabo la premiación del 6° concurso de diseño organizado por la embajada de Brasil. Como en años anteriores, la celebración se realizó en Dédalo, y en esta ocasión tanto María Elena Fernández como Eduardo Lores, se encargaron de acompañar al embajador de Brasil en la inauguración del evento. Como siempre, fue un gusto escuchar a Eduardo presentando “Antropofagia cultural: vanguardias modernistas”, en parte porque me hizo recordar la época en la que era mi profesor del curso de Estética en la facultad de comunicaciones de la PUCP, y en parte porque Eduardo con la generosidad que lo caracteriza, no se amilanó a la hora de comentar en qué consiste el diseño y cuál es su relación con el arte desde la perspectiva de dos países hermanos como Brasil y Perú. Por supuesto, siempre irreverente, también compartió algunas bromas al referirse a su trabajo como consultor de arte para Dédalo cama adentro.  my page (final version) / mi página (versión final)Me encontré con Hugo Alegre, Carmen Alegre y Julio Garay, y mientras tomaba un par de caipirinhas le pregunté a María Elena si ya había leído mi entrevista en la revista Dosis (la vi hace un par de días y le entregué un ejemplar), y también le pedí que le alcanzara la revista a Eduardo. Mientras pasaban los mozos con bandejas llenas de apetitosos bocaditos, me preguntaba si mi amigo Max ya estaría a punto de llegar. Y llegó, efectivamente, a buena hora. Hace varios años que asisto a la premiación de este concurso de diseño, pero esta es la vez en que más me he divertido. Entre los comentarios de Max sobre el reciente libro de Vargas Llosa, “La civilización del espectáculo” y mis opiniones sobre los objetos de diseño que poblaban la sala de exhibiciones, me olvidé por completo de algunas experiencias poco agradables que he tenido en Plus TV.Luego que terminara el evento, Max y yo nos fuimos caminando hasta el histórico puente de los suspiros, patrimonio cultural que ha sido víctima del desatino de algún alcalde que, seguramente entusiasmado por algún ofertón de Luz del Sur, ha cubierto todos los bordes inferiores del puente con unas luces de dudoso valor estético. Decidimos comer algo aunque yo la verdad ya estaba bastante satisfecho después de tantos bocaditos en Dédalo, pero aprovechamos para quedarnos conversando hasta la medianoche, más o menos. A continuación incluyo un dibujo a lápiz del extraordinario artista italiano Michele del Campo, a quien conocí cuando visitó Lima a fines del año pasado. Y también la página que dibujé para un futuro número de The Gathering. Y hablando de The Gathering dentro de poco escribiré una reseña sobre el número de agosto, en el que participo con una historia de 4 páginas. Por lo pronto ahí están los ejemplares sobre mi mesa, esperándome.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/09/antropofagia-cultural-vanguardias.html

DARE - Grant Morrison Rian Hughes

DARE - Grant Morrison Rian Hughes

By Arion in Blog on September 4, 2012

“Dare to look to the future”. Because we remember the past and we live in the present, we hold dear the future. We never know what tomorrow might bring and we love dreaming about adventures and space ships and brave heroes fighting against evil aliens. That was the origin of characters such as Flash Gordon or Buck Rogers back in the 30s, almost a century ago the public wanted to read about courageous men proving their mettle in a science fiction context. In 1950, Frank Hampson created his own version of Buck Rogers for England. The new character, named Dan Dare, appeared in the pages of Eagle, Britain’s most famous comic book at the time. The daring exploits of Dan Dare, pilot of the future, were published throughout several decades. I was lucky enough to read some stories from 2000AD old progs (late 70s and early 80s). Although I was more familiar with the new version of the character as written by Gerry Finlay-Day and illustrated by Dave Gibbons (how could I forget a supporting cast composed by Gunnar and Big Bear!), I was also made privy to some of the earliest quests of the space hero. In those classic tales, Dan Dare would be accompanied by Digby, a sidekick who was also the comic relief of the title. The rest of the cast would be completed by miss Peabody and Sir Hubert.In the same way that the honorable Flash Gordon would defeat the ruthless Emperor Ming or the bold Buck Rogers would annihilate menacing aliens, Dan Dare would face the evil Mekon, ruler of Venus and lord of the Treens, a skeletal green figure with a humongous head. Aimed at children in the 50s, these Dan Dare stories portrayed a clear difference between good and evil, in this tautological dichotomy Dan Dare would be honest, good, honorable and kind, while the Mekon would be deceitful, evil, corrupted and unforgiving. Sometimes it can be comforting, especially to children or immature minds, to think of the world in black and white terms: there is good and there is evil, and nothing else. Surely it would be naïve to think that the world can be reduced to two opposing terms, but 70 years ago it seemed to work alright. In 1991, Grant Morrison decided to demonstrate that Dan Dare should no longer be deemed as a childish and one-dimensional space adventurer. And thus, DARE was born.In the opening pages of “The Controversial Memoirs of Dan Dare”, we see that time has caught up with the pilot of the future. Back in 1950, sci-fi writers really enjoyed referencing ‘distant’ dates such as 1999, and so on. Consequently, Dan Dare was living in the 90s, and all the classic imagery from the 50s -space rockets, green men from Mars, ray guns and computers as big as buildings- were introduced in these early stories as an example of a technology so advanced that it could only belong to the future.In Morrison’s Dare, the future is the present. Dan Dare lives in the 90s, and all those golden dreams about the space conquest or a better and brighter future for humankind seem forever lost. Once Britain’s most acclaimed hero, Dan Dare is now an exhausted man scraping on his military pension, trying to write his memoirs to get some money out of it. But of course, he is not a writer, he’s an aging hero who can’t make heads or tails about the relevance of his past deeds. Did his victory against the wicked Treens secure life on Earth? After so many years of battles against the Mekon, is that war finally over? After so much sacrifice, pain, tears and blood, was it all worth it? It is in this context in which the former colonel of the Space Fleet finds out that a colleague from his past, miss Peabody, has committed suicide. Overwhelmed by grief, Dan Dare assists to the funeral. There are only 8 people there. 8 people paying their respects to a woman that had saved our planet hundreds of times. Besides Sir Hubert, Dan runs into his old friend, Digby, now a bitter old man who refuses to talk with him. Hughes original architecture / original arquitectura de HughesIn a state of despair, the pilot of the future will be an easy prey for Gloria Monday, the cruel and manipulative prime minister that is the identical replica of Margaret Thatcher. Indeed, Morrison (just like Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and many other legendary British authors) had publicly expressed his repudiation toward Margaret Thatcher (the Scottish creator even wrote a story about a teenager that prepares himself to assassinate the Iron Lady in “St. Swithin’s Day”). Gloria Monday has been in power for several years, and election time is coming. London is in chaos, her credibility is diminishing, people in the North are starving, constant strikes threaten to cripple the entire nation, and Monday considers that for her long term policy to come to fruition she must be reelected once again.  the abandoned Space Fleet / la Flota Espacial abandonadaGloria Monday reminds Dan of his current financial problems, and emphasizes that an old war hero deserves so much more than a meager pension. Should Dan Dare decide to endorse her candidacy and be her new publicity stunt, he could make a lot of money. Unbeknownst to the colonel, without him, the woman has no chance of getting reelected. Nonetheless, the possibility of a large check is sufficient in the end. The hero of yesterday turns into the lackey of the present.For anyone who has read the thrilling feats of the Pilot of the Future, it’s heartbreaking to observe the shortcomings of the hero. Unable to stand on his own, both figuratively (he is a man that can’t support himself economically) and literarily (due to war lesions, he can’t walk without a cane), Dan Dare will submit himself to the ploys of a huge marketing campaign. He is an unwilling accomplice to the government, and although he pretends to remain politically neutral the truth is that his heroic nature has long succumbed to the weight of age. Even so, prompted by Digby, he discovers an unsettling tape in which miss Peabody, hours before dying, reveals the truth about the government. All the unemployed teenagers that had been recruited to work in space were massacred and butchered, and turned into a biomass fueled by the Treens technology. This biomass secretes a gooey substance, an excrescence which is being transformed by British scientists into Manna, a substitute for food that will put an end to the upheavals in the North. Digby makes Dan accept that the Great Britain he used to defend and fight for no longer exists. All that remains is a wounded and hopeless country. Dan sees the derelict facilities of the Space Fleet before it was privatized and remembers the glorious days of the space conquest. He visits the cabin of Anastasia, his old spaceship, and confirms that this is a fight he can’t win with laser rays. As Digby takes Dan to the North, he realizes that all teenagers are either recruited to work off-world or are deeply addicted to a dangerous drug produced by Treen refugees. Indeed, after so many decades of war, the defeated Treens are now coexisting with humans in the most miserable and wretched urban areas. This is a bleak and depressing future, and for all his cunning and altruism, Dan Dare has finally found a trouble that he can’t solve. the past: war against the Treens / el pasado: la guerra contra los TreensOne of the things I love the most about Morrison’s approach is how he defies the reader, in the same way that he defies the people who voted for Margaret Thatcher. Whenever we elect a leader, aren’t we at least partially responsible for the atrocities committed during his or her government? Dan Dare had killed Treen workers who were only defending their rights, and he had even murdered children. Digby was never able to forgive those callous actions. But isn’t Digby just as guilty as Dan Dare for simply standing by and watching all the horror without ever interfering? “What went wrong? What’s going wrong? We were going to build Utopia. A golden future for everyone” asks the pilot of the future, and his former sidekick, without hesitation replies “We built on shite, that’s what went wrong. It’s no foundation. Sooner or later you sink in it, right up to your neck. And that’s when you find you’re not alone. There are poor people down there, there are sick people and hundreds of murdered children”. Searching for clues in miss Peabody’s house, Dan Dare and Digby are surrounded by a group of soldiers. Here the last trace of swashbuckling sci-fi missions is gone, as the armed men coldly attack the heroes. Dan, with his limp, can barely escape. He’s not a young warrior ready to defeat his enemy. The only one brave or fool enough to stay behind is Digby, who manages to gun down three soldiers before the others put a bullet in his head. It’s a cold and harsh ending for a hero that had survived in so many crazy adventures, against a myriad of aliens and space menaces. He meets his end on his own country, trying to defend his ideals.Up to this point, in every decade (the 50s or the 80s), the success of Dan Dare was guaranteed. That’s not the case here. Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Gloria Monday knows this, for her, the pursuit of power is almost as rewarding as power itself. She sends guards to retrieve Dan Dare and as the former space explorer is forced to attend the celebration of her victory, he understands that without him, the woman would have lost the elections. The figure of a noble hero was enough for the prime minister’s marketing department to insufflate new life into an already waning political figure. And then comes the last moment of damnation: the arrival of the Mekon. For years, considered humankind’s greatest enemy, he’s now one of Monday’s closest allies. In this groundbreaking graphic novel about politics, power and Thatcherism, Morrison teaches us a lesson. To stand idly by and watch how the world turns into ruins makes us guilty by association. Dan Dare understands this too late: his life is already forfeit. I understand that DARE was very polemic when it originally came out. I guess it was hard for everyone to watch their childhood hero losing the one battle that counted the most. The laser guns, the green Treen, the big headed Mekon, it all seemed so trivial amidst the painful reality of a future devoid of hope and freedom. Certainly, this 72 page odyssey wouldn’t have been the same without Rian Hughes wondrous art. The artist is famous for his highly stylized approach, he is a master of design too and that shows in everything he does, from the titles to the covers and back covers of Dare, to the Art Nouveau architecture of ‘yesterday’s tomorrows’ (after all Rian has always felt fascinated by the anachronic vision of the future that people used to have half a century ago). Telephones, disc players, buildings, there is so much thought in every element that populates the pages of Dare. Clearly, Rian was able to embrace Grant’s vision of the future and visually capture it. Together, they create an unforgettable work of art about one of Britain’s greatest fictional heroes.  __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Digby's last stand / la hora final de Digby"Atreveos a mirar hacia el futuro". Porque recordamos el pasado y vivimos en el presente, adoramos el futuro. Nunca sabemos lo que deparará el mañana y nos encanta soñar con aventuras, naves espaciales y valientes héroes que pelean contra malvados extraterrestres. Ese fue el origen de personajes como Flash Gordon o Buck Rogers en los años 30, hace casi un siglo el público quería leer sobre el coraje de aquellos hombres que ponían su temple a prueba en un contexto de ciencia ficción. En 1950, Frank Hampson creó su propia versión de Buck Rogers para Inglaterra. El nuevo personaje, llamado Dan Dare, aparecía en las páginas de Eagle, el cómic británico más famoso de aquellos tiempos.Las audaces hazañas de Dan Dare, el piloto del futuro, fueron publicadas a lo largo de varias décadas. Tuve la suerte de leer algunas historias en 2000AD (publicadas a fines de los 70 e inicios de los 80). Aunque estaba más familiarizado con la nueva versión del personaje escrita por Gerry Finlay-Day e ilustrada por Dave Gibbons (¡cómo podría olvidar a un elenco compuesto por Gunnar y Big Bear!). También tuve acceso a algunas de las antiguas aventuras del héroe espacial. En estos clásicos relatos, Dan Dare era acompañado por Digby, su ocurrente compañero que a la vez ponía una nota de humor. El resto del elenco incluía a miss Peabody y Sir Hubert.Del mismo modo que el honorable Flash Goron derrotaría al despiadado emperador Ming o el osado Buck Rogers aniquilaría la amenaza extraterrestre, Dan Dare se enfrentaría contra el malévolo Mekon, gobernante de Venus y amo de los Treens, una esquelética figura verde con una cabeza gigantesca. Orientadas para los niños de los 50, estas historias retrataban una clara diferencia entre el bien y el mal, en esta dicotomía tautológica, Dan Dare sería honesto, bueno, honorable y amable mientras que el Mekon sería mentiroso, maligno, corrupto e inmisericorde.A veces puede ser reconfortante, especialmente para los niños o las mentes inmaduras, pensar en el mundo en blanco y negro: existe el bien y existe el mal, y nada más. Seguramente, sería ingenuo pensar que el mundo puede reducirse a dos términos opuestos, pero hace 70 años esto parecía funcionar. En 1991, Grant Morrison decidió demostrar que Dan Dare ya no debía ser considerado como un infantil y unidimensional aventurero del espacio. Y de este modo, DARE nació.En las primeras páginas de "Las controversiales memorias de Dan Dare" vemos que el tiempo ha alcanzado al piloto del futuro. En 1950, los escritores de ciencia ficción disfrutaban haciendo referencias a fechas 'distantes' como 1999 o similares. En consecuencia, Dan Dare vivía en los 90, y toda las imágenes clásicas de los 50 -cohetes espaciales, marcianos verdes, pistolas de rayos y computadoras tan grandes como edificios- estaban presentes en estas historias como ejemplo de una tecnología tan avanzada que sólo podía pertenecer al futuro.En el DARE de Morrison, el futuro es el presente. Dan Dare vive en los 90, y todos esos sueños dorados sobre la conquista espacial o un mejor y prometedor futuro para la humanidad se han extraviado para siempre. Alguna vez el héroe británico más aclamado, Dan Dare es ahora un hombre exhausto que sobrevive apenas con su pensión militar y que intenta escribir sus memorias para ganar un poco de dinero. Pero, por supuesto, él no es un escritor, es un héroe avejentado que no puede decidir cuál es la relevancia de sus obras pasadas. ¿Su victoria contra los traicioneros Treens aseguró la vida en la Tierra? Luego de tantos años de batallas contra el Mekon, ¿esa guerra ha terminado por fin? ¿Y qué hay de su sacrificio, dolor, lágrimas y sangre?, ¿acaso valió la pena? MekonEs en este contexto en el que el ex coronel de la Flota Espacial se entera de que una colega de su pasado, miss Peabody, se ha suicidado. Abrumado por la tristeza, Dan Dare asiste al funeral. Hay sólo 8 personas allí. 8 personas rindiendo homenaje a una mujer que había salvado nuestro planeta cientos de veces. Además de Sir Hubert, Dan se encuentra con otro viejo amigo, Digby, ahora un anciano amargado que rehúsa hablar con él.Desesperado, el piloto del futuro será presa fácil para Gloria Monday, la cruel y manipuladora primera ministra, que es una réplica exacta de Margaret Thatcher. De hecho Morrison (al igual que Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman y muchos otros legendarios autores británicos) había expresado públicamente su repudio hacia Margaret Thatcher (el creador escocés incluso escribió una historia en la que un adolescente planea asesinar a la Dama de Hierro en “St. Swithin’s Day”). Gloria Monday ha estado en el poder por años, y la época de elecciones se acerca. Londres está en caos, su credibilidad ha disminuido, la gente en el norte se muere de hambre, constantes huelgas amenazan con paralizar a la nación entera, y Monday considera que para que su política a largo plazo rinda frutos debe ser reelegida una vez más. Dan Dare's posters / posters de Dan DareGloria Monday le recuerda a Dan sus actuales problemas financieros, y enfatiza que un viejo héroe de la guerra merece algo más que una mísera pensión. Si acaso Dan Dare decidiese apoyar su candidatura y ser su nuevo ardid publicitario, podría ganar un montón de dinero. El coronel no puede saberlo, pero sin él, la mujer no tiene ninguna oportunidad de ser reelegida. No obstante, la posibilidad de un jugoso cheque al final es más que suficiente. El héroe del ayer se convierte en el lacayo del presente.Para cualquiera que haya leído las emocionantes proezas del piloto del futuro, es desolador observar las limitaciones del héroe. Incapaz de sostenerse figurativamente (no puede sostenerse económicamente) y literariamente (debido a las lesiones de la guerra, no puede caminar si un bastón), Dan Dare se someterá a las estratagemas de una colosal campaña de marketing. Él es un involuntario cómplice del gobierno, y aunque finge ser políticamente neutral, la verdad es que su naturaleza heroica hace mucho que ha sucumbido al peso de los años.Aun así, instigado por Digby, descubre una perturbadora grabación en la que miss Peabody, horas antes de morir, revela la verdad sobre el gobierno. Todos los adolescentes desempleados que habían sido reclutados para trabajar en el espacio fueron masacrados y descuartizados, y convertidos en una biomasa que funciona con tecnología de los Treens. Esta biomasa exuda una sustancia viscosa, un sustituto de comida que pondrá fin a las revueltas en el norte. Digby logra que Dan acepte que la Gran Bretaña que él solía defender ya no existe. Todo lo que queda es un país herido y sin esperanzas. Dan observa las instalaciones abandonadas de la Flota Espacial antes de que todo se privatizara y recuerda los gloriosos días de la conquista espacial. Visita la cabina de Anastasia, su vieja nave espacial, y descubre que esta es una lucha que no puede ganar con rayos láser. Cuando Digby lleva a Dan al norte, él se da cuenta de que todos los adolescentes son enviados fuera de la Tierra o son adictos a una peligrosa droga producida por los refugiados Treen. De hecho, después de muchas décadas de guerra, los derrotados Treens ahora coexisten con los humanos en las zonas urbanas más miserables y arruinadas. Este es un sombrío y deprimente futuro, y a pesar de toda su astucia y altruismo, Dan Dare finalmente ha encontrado un problema que no puede solucionar.Una de las cosas que más me gustan del enfoque de Morrison es cómo desafía al lector, del mismo modo que desafía a la gente que votó por Margaret Thatcher. Cuando elegimos un líder ¿no somos al menos parcialmente responsables de las atrocidades que cometa durante su gobierno? Dan Dare ha matado a obreros Treen que sólo defendían sus derechos, e incluso ha asesinado niños. Digby nunca pudo perdonar estos terribles actos. Pero, ¿no es Digby tan culpable como Dan Dare al haber observado todo este horror sin intervenir?"¿Qué salió mal? ¿Qué es lo que está mal? Íbamos a construir una utopía. Un futuro dorado para todos" pregunta el piloto del futuro, y su antiguo aliado, sin dudar, le responde "Construimos sobre la mierda, eso es lo que salió mal. Eso no sirve como cimientos. Tarde o temprano te hundes en la mierda, hasta el cuello. Y allí ves que no estás solo. Hay gente pobre allí abajo, hay gente enferma y cientos de niños asesinados". Al buscar pistas en la casa de miss Peabody, Dan Dare y Digby son rodeados por un grupo de soldados. Aquí los últimos rastros de las misiones aventureras de ciencia ficción desaparecen, y es que los hombres armados atacan fríamente a los héroes. Dan, con su cojera, apenas logra escapar. No es un joven guerrero preparado para el enemigo. El único con suficiente valentía o idiotez como para quedarse es Digby, que se las arregla para abatir a tres soldados antes que los otros le disparen en la cabeza. Es un frío y cruel final para un héroe que había sobrevivido a tantas aventuras alocadas, contra una miríada de alienígenas y amenazas siderales. El fin llega a él en su propia patria, mientras defiende sus ideales.Hasta este momento, en cada década (en los 50 o en los 80), el éxito de Dan Dare estaba garantizado. Pero ya no es así. El poder corrompe, y el poder absoluto corrompe absolutamente. Gloria Monday lo sabe, para ella, la búsqueda del poder es casi tan gratificante como el poder en sí mismo. Ella envía a algunos guardias para encontrar a Dan Dare y así, el explorador espacial es obligado a asistir a la celebración de la victoria de la mujer. Él entiende que sin su colaboración, ella habría perdido las elecciones. La figura de un héroe noble fue suficiente para que el departamento de marketing insuflara nueva vida en una figura política decadente.Y luego está el último momento de condena: la llegada del Mekon. Por años, el mayor enemigo de la humanidad, ahora es uno de los más cercanos aliados de Monday. En esta innovadora novela gráfica sobre la política, el poder y el thatcherismo, Morrison nos enseña una lección. Mirar de brazos cruzados cómo el mundo se arruina nos hace culpables por asociación. Dan Dare comprende esto demasiado tarde: su vida ya no le pertenece.Entiendo que DARE fue muy polémico cuando fue originalmente publicado. Supongo que era difícil para todos ver al héroe de su infancia perder la única batalla que importada. Las pistolas láser, los Treen verdes, el Mekon cabezón, todo parecía tan trivial en la dolorosa realidad de un futuro desprovisto de esperanza y libertad. Ciertamente, esta odisea de 72 páginas no sería la misma sin el maravilloso arte de Rian Hughes. El artista es famoso por su enfoque altamente estilizado, también es un maestro del diseño y eso se ve en todo lo que hace, desde el título hasta las portadas y contraportadas de Dare, y la arquitectura Art Nouveau de estos 'mañanas del ayer' (al fin y al cabo, Rian siempre se ha sentido fascinado por las visiones anacrónicas del futuro que la gente solía tener hace medio siglo). Teléfonos, tocadiscos, edificios, cada elemento ha sido pensado con cuidado. Claramente, Rian fue capaz de asimilar la visión de Morrison y plasmarla en la página. Juntos, crean una inolvidable obra de arte sobre uno de los mayores héroes británicos de ficción.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/09/dare-grant-morrison-rian-hughes.html

August Films / películas de agosto

August Films / películas de agosto

By Arion in Blog on September 1, 2012

In 2005 I saw “Batman Begins”, it was a much needed reinterpretation on an iconic character that had been mishandled in previous filmic incarnations. Then came “The Dark Knight” (2008), a masterpiece of the superhero genre and one of the best films I’ve seen in my life (I’m including it on my personal Top 100). Now it was time for The Dark Knight Rises (2012), the last part of Christopher Nolan’s trilogy. Christian Bale (Bruce Wayne), Gary Oldman (Commissioner Gordon), Morgan Freeman (Lucius Fox) and Michael Caine (Alfred Pennyworth) are once again reunited for the shocking conclusion of this saga. An already talented cast is complemented by actors such as Tom Hardy (Bane), Joseph Gordon-Levitt (Blake), Anne Hathaway (Selina) and Marion Cotillard (Miranda / Talia). The Dark Knight Rises is an intense story that has been inspired by some of the most extraordinary Batman comics. We have an older Bruce Wayne isolated in his mansion and out of shape, very similar to Frank Miller’s groundbreaking reimagining of the character in The Dark Knight Returns; we also have references to Son of the Demon (the romance of Bruce Wayne and Talia, daughter of Ra’s Al Ghul), Knightfall (Bane breaking Batman’s spine) and most especially No Man’s Land (personally one of my favorite sagas from the past 20 years, an ambitious story that lasted for almost two years and was developed through multiple Batman titles simultaneously). The Dark Knight Rises also connects with the two previous films, thus rewarding loyal fans. A truly great Batman film that everyone should have seen by now. Woody Allen’s To Rome with Love (2012) is a very entertaining comedy with some surrealist touches and lighthearted characters. Roberto Benigni is a common man that becomes famous, proving that all famous people are, in reality, as vain, as shallow and as uninteresting as he is, except that they have the fortune of fame. Penélope Cruz is an attractive prostitute that will create more than a few problems for a recently married man. Jesse Eisenberg is a young architect mentored by his older self (Alec Baldwin) who has an affair with his girlfriend’s best friend. There are some great moments here, and I laughed a lot in some of the scenes. It was also so wonderful to see a couple of surprises: Woody acting again and the special appearance of legendary actress Ornella Muti. The Ward (2010) directed by John Carpenter is a horror story about a group of girls in a mental institution, Carpenter creates some truly scary moments, although the ending is a bit of a let dow; Amber Heard is the protagonist and she gives a strong performance. The Hitcher (2007) is starred by Sean Bean (a tremendously dangerous psychopath killer that hitchhikes and kills people on the road), and Zachary Knighton (who had a minor role in the magnificent “The Mudge Boy”) and Sophia Bush; it has good moments, although sometimes the action scenes are too exaggerated. Captivity (2007) is about a supermodel kidnapped by a sadist, as she’s tortured inside a mysterious room, she soon befriends another prisoner. Except for a few minor plot holes, this is a compelling story with lots of suspense packed in it. Attack the Block (2011) is quite an interesting British production that chronicles an alien invasion in one of the poorest areas of London. A group of young kids, including Luke Treadaway (famous for his role as a homosexual teen willing to have sex with an older man in “Clapham Junction”) will defeat the aliens. Humor, explosive surprises and a clever plot add value to an already original approach. Bummer Summer (2010) is a black and white, independent movie directed, written and starred by Zach Weintraub, it deals with teenage romance, hormones and the awakening of sexuality in a subtle and yet compelling manner. Up until the late 80s, the church was insured against lawsuits that involved accusations of sexual abuse. Judgment (1990) narrates the quandaries of a religious family that makes a startling discovery: their youngest son had been repeatedly raped by the town’s priest. Based on a real life case, this movie tackles on the difficult subject of pedophilia within members of the church, and explains why, in the late 80s, the insurance companies decided to stop protecting the church, after all, the cases of child molestation became very frequent. In a similar venue, The Boys of St. Vincent (1992) is a Canadian production that focuses on an orphanage. Inside its walls, priests and reverends practice anal sex with underage boys on a daily basis, without parents or family, these kids are treated as sexual slaves, until one of them manages to escape and tells the shocking truth to the police. It’s also based on a real life case. Richard Bell’s Eighteen (2005) is a peculiar story about male bonding in WWII (Brendan Fletcher is an 18-year-old soldier trying to survive in the aftermath of a gruesome battle) and Paul Anthony is an immature young man who has access to the memories of the young soldier. Homosexuality is present in both scenarios, as the libidinal link between Brendan Fletcher and another soldier, and in Paul Anthony’s family (his gay brother had been abused by his own father). I liked the way homosexuality is only hinted at, being disclosed only in the case of Paul Anthony’s best friend, a male prostitute.  It had been a while since the last time I saw so many short films, so this month all of them come from the Cruel Britannia anthology. All Over Brazil is about an Irish boy who loves sports but has a secret tendency he must hide at all costs: he enjoys dressing up as a woman and wearing his sister’s makeup. I Don’t Care is an intense tale about a young man who helps his sick mother, practically slaved by the constant care of the old woman, he has been deprived of a real life, until he finds an attractive drug addict that seems to be very interested in having sex with him. I liked it, and I thought it had a poignant ending. Downing is an hilarious short film about a gay teen and a girl that go to a party, the gay soon finds himself fascinated by the boy who’s throwing the party, and after sneaking into his room starts masturbating while fantasizing about him. This is a very refreshing take on the typical ‘gay in straight party’ formula, all actors are young but very talented. I highly recommend it. Man and Boy, as the title suggests, depicts the relationship between an underage boy and a mature man, when the child’s father discovers that there’s something fishy going on, he becomes violent, however he doesn’t know that the boy, instead of a victim, had actually seduced the man in the first place. Nightswimming is a melancholic tale about a high school kid and his girlfriend, who break into a gymnasium to swim in the pool, the guard doesn’t say anything but keeps watching them, clearly, the old man feels an unspoken desire towards the young male body he contemplates, and when the girl is sleeping and the adult and the lad are in the bathroom together, something happens between them. Spring is an intense display of a sadomasochist encounter, a student accepts to visit a man that wishes to torture him, I liked the director’s boldness and his treatment of a theme that is rarely explored. Diana and What You Looking At are two interesting short films that explore the lives of transgendered individuals. This month I also watched Positively Naked (2005), a documentary about Spencer Tunick and POZ magazine, the well-known artist decides to photograph a naked group of 85 HIV positive people. As men and women get naked, they also reveal their innermost fears and worries about their disease. Of course, August wouldn’t be complete without some international productions. From Spain comes El Bola (2000) directed by Achero Mañas, Juan José Ballesta has his first main role here, and he excels as a young boy that is abused by his father and seeks shelter in his best friend’s family. There is something unique about the way Mañas portrays a fragmented family, which is nothing but a reflection of an ideologically and economically fragmented coutry. With very moving moments, El Bola deals with the complicated subject of child abuse; coming of age and friendship are also fundamental aspects of the film. Eu Me Lembro (2005) is a Brazilian production in which a young boy remembers his entire life, when he was a kid and he spied on his brother having sex, when he was a teenager and was following his friends advice on masturbation techniques and when he was a young adult, losing his virginity and finding the psychedelic drugs and music that defined the 60s. Peter Kern’s Blutsfreundschaft (2009) is a coming of age story about a young man that becomes a Neo Nazi (Harry Lampl) and after accidentally murdering a man finds refuge in the Helmut Berger’s house, the old man is a homosexual who feels enthralled by the beauty of the teenager, but nothing can be easy in a town subjugated by Neo Nazis and homophobes. Especially memorable are the flashback scenes in which Berger remembers his past as part of the Hitler Youth Movement in WWII, violence and a homosexual romance with another boy tarnished his reputation for life.Svoboda Eto Rai (1990) is a Russian movie about Sasha, a child that is locked up in an institution for underage orphans. The sexual abuse and the constant fights turn this place into a true hell, so Sasha runs away over and over again, always getting captured, until he finally achieves his goal. He travels thousands of miles until he arrives to a state prison. Inside those walls, his father is a prisoner. Wszystko Co Kocham (2009) is a Polish film directed by Jacek Borcuch and starred by Mateusz Kosciukiewicz and Jakub Gierszal (famous for his role as a sexually ambiguous teen in “Sala samobójców”). Translated as “All that we love”, this is an unforgettable story about a group of boys growing up in the turmoil of communism and a socially disjointed nation. The boys have a punk band and are deemed as subversives by teachers and military authorities, however the strength of their friendship allows them to overcome all obstacles. Mateusz Kosciukiewicz loses a relative, has sex for the first time in his life and discovers love in the arms of a lovely girl. If I had to choose the best film of the month it would probably be this one. Curiously, years ago I knew nothing about Poland’s filmic productions and after watching Sala samobójców and Wszystko Co Kocham I’m sure I’ll continue finding many other hidden gems. ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ En el 2005 vi “Batman Begins”, una necesaria reinterpretación del icónico personaje que había tenido mala suerte en anteriores reencarnaciones fílmicas. Luego llegó “The Dark Knight” (2008) una obra maestra del género de súper-héroes y una de las mejores películas que he visto en mi vida (la incluyo en mi top 100 personal). Ahora era el momento de "The Dark Knight Rises" (2012), la última parte de la trilogía de Christopher Nolan. Christian Bale (Bruce Wayne), Gary Oldman (comisionado Gordon), Morgan Freeman (Lucius Fox) y Michael Caine (Alfred Pennyworth) se reúnen nuevamente en la impactante conclusión de esta saga. Un elenco talentoso es complementado por actores como Tom Hardy (Bane), Joseph Gordon-Levitt (Blake), Anne Hathaway (Selina) y Marion Cotillard (Miranda / Talia). "The Dark Knight Rises" es una historia intensa que ha sido inspirada por algunos de los más extraordinarios cómics de Batman. Tenemos a un Bruce Wayne avejentado, en malas condiciones y aislado en su mansión, muy similar a la versión de Frank Miller en "The Dark Knight Returns"; también hay referencias a "Knightfall" (Bane rompe la columna vertebral de Batman) y especialmente a "No Man’s Land" (personalmente una de mis sagas favoritas de los últimos 20 años, un ambicioso relato que duró cerca de dos años y fue desarrollado en múltiples títulos de Batman simultáneamente). "The Dark Knight Rises" también se conecta con las dos películas previas, recompensando así a los fans leales. Una gran película que todos deberían haber visto."To Rome with Love" (2012) de Woody Allen es una entretenida comedia con personajes desenfadados. Roberto Benigni es un hombre común que se vuelve famoso, demostrando que todas las personas famosas son, en realidad, tan vanidosas, superficiales y poco interesantes como él, aunque tienen la fortuna de la fama. Penélope Cruz es una atractiva prostituta que creará más de un problema a un recién casado. Jesse Eisenberg es un joven arquitecto que se encuentra consigo mismo en versión adulta (Alec Baldwin) y tiene un romance con la mejor amiga de su enamorada. Hay momentos grandiosos aquí, y me reí bastante en algunas escenas. También fue estupendo ver un par de sorpresas: Woody actuando nuevamente y la aparición especial de la legendaria actriz Ornella Muti. "The Ward" (2010) dirigida por John Carpenter es una historia de terror sobre un grupo de chicas en un manicomio, Carpenter logra crear momentos que asustan aunque el final es un poco decepcionante; Amber Heard, la protagonista, actúa bastante bien. "The Hitcher" (2007) es protagonizada por Sean Bean (un asesino psicópata tremendamente peligroso que mata gente en la carretera), y Zachary Knighton (tuvo un rol menor en la magnífica “The Mudge Boy”) y Sophia Bush; hay buenos momentos, aunque a veces las escenas de acción son demasiado exageradas. "Captivity" (2007) es sobre una supermodelo secuestrada por un sádico, mientras es torturada en una misteriosa habitación, se hace amiga de un prisionero. Excepto por algunos huecos argumentales, se trata de una historia que atrapa y con buen suspenso. "Attack the Block" (2011) es una interesante producción británica que narra una invasión extraterrestre en una de las áreas más pobres de Londres. Un grupo de jóvenes, incluyendo a Luke Treadaway (famoso por su rol como un adolescente homosexual dispuesto a tener sexo con un adulto en “Clapham Junction”), derrotarán a los extraterrestres. Humor, explosivas sorpresas y un argumento bien planteado añaden valor a una propuesta ya de por sí valiosa. "Bummer Summer" (2010), escrita, dirigida y protagonizada por Zach Weintraub es una cinta independiente en blanco y negro que lidia con el romance adolescente, las hormonas y el despertar de la sexualidad de forma sutil pero cautivadora.Hasta fines de los 80, la iglesia estaba asegurada contra demandas por abuso sexual. Judgment (1990) narra los pormenores de una familia religiosa que descubre algo terrible: el hijo menor había sido violado repetidas veces por el cura del pueblo. Basado en un caso de la vida real, la película aborda el difícil tema de la pedofilia en los miembros de la iglesia y explica por qué, en los 80, las aseguradoras decidieron darle la espalda a la iglesia, después de todo, los casos de violación de menores eran cada vez más frecuentes. De similar temática, "The Boys of St. Vincent" (1992) es una producción canadiense que se enfoca en un orfanato. Dentro de sus muros, reverendos y curas practican sexo anal con muchachos menores de edad a diario, sin padres o familia, estos chiquillos son tratados como esclavos sexuales hasta que uno de ellos escapa y cuenta la terrible verdad a la policía. También se basa en un caso de la vida real. "Eighteen" (2005) de Richard Bell es una peculiar historia sobre la amistad entre hombres en la Segunda Guerra Mundial (Brendan Fletcher es un soldado de 18 años intentando sobrevivir luego de una sangrienta batalla) y Paul Anthony es un inmaduro joven que tiene acceso a las memorias del joven soldado. La homosexualidad está presente en ambos escenarios, ya sea como el vínculo libidinal entre Brendan Fletcher y otro soldado, o en la familia de Paul Anthony (su hermano gay había sido abusado por el padre de ambos). Me gustó ver cómo la homosexualidad es solamente sugerida, resultando evidente solamente en el caso del mejor amigo de Paul, un prostituto. my drawing / mi dibujoHacía tiempo que no veía tantos cortometrajes, así que este mes todos vienen de la antología “Cruel Britannia”. "All Over Brazil" es sobre un chiquillo irlandés que ama los deportes pero tiene una tendencia secreta que debe ocultar: disfruta vistiéndose como mujer y usando el maquillaje de su hermana. "I Don’t Care" es un intenso relato sobre un joven que es el enfermero de su madre, prácticamente esclavizado al cuidar a esta mujer enferma, ha sido privado de una vida real, hasta que encuentra a un atractivo drogadicto que está muy interesado en tener sexo con él. Tiene un buen final. "Downing" es un hilarante cortometraje sobre un adolescente gay que va a una fiesta con una chica, el chico gay se siente rápidamente fascinado por el dueño de la casa, y luego de entrar a su cuarto se masturba mientras fantasea con él. Este es un giro refrescante en la típica fórmula de "gay en una fiesta heterosexual", todos los actores son jóvenes pero sumamente talentosos. Lo recomiendo. "Man and Boy", como sugiere el título, retrata la relación entre un menor de edad y un adulto, cuando el padre del chaval descubre que algo raro pasa, reacciona violentamente, sin embargo, él no sabe que el jovencito, en vez de ser una víctima, había seducido al adulto. "Nightswimming" es un melancólico relato sobre un estudiante de secundaria y su enamorada; ambos se meten a nadar en una piscina sin permiso, y el guardia no les dice nada pero los observa, claramente, el hombre siente un deseo innombrable hacia el joven cuerpo masculino, y cuando la chica duerme y el viejo y el muchacho están juntos en el baño, algo sucede entre ellos. "Spring" es un intenso vistazo a un encuentro sadomasoquista, un estudiante acepta visitar a un hombre que desea torturarlo, me agradó la audacia del director y el tratamiento de un tema que rara vez es explorado. "Diana" y "What You Looking At" son dos interesantes cortometrajes sobre transexuales. Este mes también vi "Positively Naked" (2005), un documental sobre Spencer Tunick y la revista POZ, el conocido artista decide fotografiar a un grupo de 85 portadores del SIDA desnudos. Mientras hombres y mujeres se desvisten, también revelan sus más profundos miedos y preocupaciones sobre su enfermedad.Por supuesto, agosto no estaría completo sin algunas producciones internacionales. De España llega "El Bola" (2000) dirigida por Achero Mañas, Juan José Ballesta tiene su primer rol protagónico y destaca como un niño que al sufrir el abuso de su padre busca cobijo en la familia de su mejor amigo. Hay algo único en la manera en que Mañas retrata a una familia fragmentada, que no es otra cosa sino el reflejo de un país ideológica y económicamente fragmentado. Con momentos conmovedores, El Bola asume la complicada temática del abuso infantil, el crecimiento y la amistad son también aspectos fundamentales del film. "Eu Me Lembro" (2005) es una producción de Brasil, un joven recuerda toda su vida, añora la época en la que era un niño y espiaba a su hermano durante sus coitos furtivos, la época en la que era un adolescente siguiendo los consejos de sus amigos sobre técnicas masturbatorias; finalmente cuando ya es joven, pierde la virginidad y encuentra las drogas psicodélicas y la música que definieron los 60. "Blutsfreundschaft" (2009) de Peter Kern describe los avatares de un jovencito que se vuelve neo nazi (Harry Lampl) y luego de asesinar accidentalmente a un hombre busca refugio en el hogar de Helmut Berger, un anciano homosexual fascinado por la belleza del adolescente, pero nada es fácil en un pueblo subyugado por neo nazis y homofóbicos. Son especialmente memorables los flashback en los que Berger recuerda su pasado como parte del movimiento juvenil hitleriano en la Segunda Guerra Mundial, la violencia y el romance homosexual con otro muchachito embarran su reputación de por vida."Svoboda Eto Rai" (1990) es una cinta rusa sobre Sasha, un niño que está encerrado en una institución para huérfanos menores de edad. Los abusos sexuales y las constantes peleas hacen de este lugar un infierno, así que Sasha intenta escapar una y otra vez y siempre es capturado, hasta que finalmente alcanza su meta. Viaja miles de millas hasta que llega a una prisión estatal. Su padre es un prisionero allí. "Wszystko Co Kocham" (2009) es un film polaco dirigido por Jacek Borcuch y protagonizado por Mateusz Kosciukiewicz y Jakub Gierszal (famoso por su rol como un adolescente sexualmente ambiguo en “Sala samobójców”). Traducida como "Todo lo que amamos", esta es una inolvidable historia sobre un grupo de chicos que crecen en el caos del comunismo y de una nación socialmente descoyuntada. Los muchachos tienen un grupo punk y son considerados como subversivos por profesores y autoridades militares, sin embargo la fuerza de la amistad les permite sobreponerse a todos los obstáculos. Mateusz Kosciukiewicz experimenta la muerte de un familiar, el sexo por primera vez en su vida y descubre el amor en los brazos de una adorable chica. Si tuviera que elegir la mejor película del mes probablemente sería esta. Curiosamente, hace años no sabía nada del cine polaco, y luego de ver "Sala samobójców" y "Wszystko Co Kocham" estoy seguro que seguiré encontrando joyas ocultas.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/09/august-films-peliculas-de-agosto.html

Saga of the Swamp Thing # 25, 26 27 - Moore, Bissette Totleben

Saga of the Swamp Thing # 25, 26 27 - Moore, Bissette Totleben

By Arion in Blog on August 27, 2012

Stephen R. Bissette & John TotlebenToo often we overlook how extraordinary some of DC’s characters could be. In order for us to surmise the formidable features of someone like Jason Blood, we must first understand him as a human. Because demons cannot exist in a world deprived of humanity, like symbiotic creatures, without human souls the devil would die of starvation. Jason Blood has been portrayed before as a mere man who dabbles with occultism, but here he’s so much more. Alan Moore gives us a glimpse of Blood’s attitude and that’s more than enough to fear him almost as much as we would fear a demon such as Etrigan -Blood’s alter ego.Abigail has just started working in an institution specialized in autistic children. She’s excited about her new job, she longs for at least a resemblance of her old, normal life. And then Blood appears and she knows that for her normality has forever been forfeit.“The Sleep of Reason” (June 1984) is a beautifully crafted tale that encompasses a rich and complex cast of characters; in its polyphonic approach lies its greatest narrative strength. We have Jason Blood admiring Goya’s famous painting and remembering how he met the artist centuries ago, we have Abby and her compassion towards children, we have Paul, the autistic child that dreams of the Monkey King, a white creature of fear, we have Matt Cable, Abby’s unapologetically alcoholic husband and, of course, we have Alec Holland too.“Yes, for every child, rich or poor… there’s a time of running through a dark place; and there’s no word for a child’s fear”; in “A Time of Running” (July 1984) Alan Moore quotes “Night of the Hunter” by James Agee, and we understand that, indeed, infantile fears are unnamed; they’re dark things that can barely be comprehended.As we had seen before, Paul had witnessed the arrival of the Monkey King, a creature capable of awakening people’s deepest fears, and so long as fear prevails, this nightmarish monster will become stronger. When a naked teenager named Vince attacks Abby, she understands that something wrong is going on in Elysium Lawns. As Abigail concludes: “I used to think I knew from fear… I didn’t. All I knew were the suburbs of fear… and now here I am, in the big city”.  The Sleep of Reason / El sueño de la razón Matt Cable“By Demons Driven” (August 1984) takes us right into the heart of the conflict, as both the Swamp Thing and the Demon Etrigan battle against the Monkey King. The devil’s herald is no match against a monster that is nurtured by fear, and the Swamp Thing, although immune to the powers of the white beast, can’t do anything to deter him. In the end, only Paul’s childish innocence can defeat the Monkey King. In every page, we have Moore’s poetry. He’s a master of both, content and style. His complex vocabulary complements the rhythm of his phrases; his unusual synecdoches and his incredibly creative metaphors, add meaning and depth to an already fascinating saga. Therefore, only a creative team as talented as the one formed by Stephen R. Bissette and John Totleben could do any justice to Moore’s script. Their technique is akin to Francisco de Goya’s style and other Romanticism artists as well. Whenever the characters run for their lives, we have a ragged surface, without smooth finishes, and at the same time we also have exquisitely painted details. Tatjana Wood’s coloring also helps Bissette and Totleben, the red in the victims’ blood is like a dark alizarin crimson smeared on thick inks, it looks crusty and scratchy, just like real blood would. With a few gestures of the brush, Totleben transforms Bissette’s pencils into the most sublime expression of art. Time and time again, both artists provide us with moments of unassuageable pathos.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Monkey King / Rey MonoA menudo olvidamos lo formidables que pueden ser algunos de los personajes de DC. Para conjeturar las misteriosas razones de alguien como Jason Blood, primero debemos entenderlo como humano. Porque los demonios no podrían existir en un mundo desprovisto de humanidad. Como criaturas simbióticas, sin almas humanas, los demonios morirían de hambre.Jason Blood ha sido retratado antes como un simple sujeto que experimentaba con el ocultismo, pero aquí es mucho más que eso. Alan Moore nos permite ver la actitud de Blood, y eso es más que suficiente para temerle casi tanto como al demonio Etrigan -el otro yo de Blood. from man to monster / de hombre a monstruoAbigail ha empezado a trabajar en una institución especializada en niños autistas. Está emocionada con su nuevo trabajo, busca algo que al menos se parezca un poco a su antigua vida normal. Y entonces Blood aparece y ella comprende que ya no podrá alcanzar esa normalidad. “El sueño de la razón” (junio de 1984) es un relato hermosamente diseñado que engloba un rico y complejo elenco de personajes; en su enfoque polifónico yace su mayor fortaleza narrativa. Tenemos a Jason Blood admirando la famosa pintura de Goya y recordando cómo conoció al artista hace siglos, tenemos a Abby y su compasión por los niños, tenemos a Paul, el niño autista que sueña con el Rey Mono, una criatura blanca del miedo, tenemos a Matt Cable, el inexcusablemente alcohólico esposo de Abby y, por supuesto, también tenemos a Alec Holland. the Demon Etrigan / el demonio Etrigan"Sí, para cada niño, rico o pobre... llega la hora de correr a través de un lugar oscuro; y no existen palabras para el miedo de un niño"; en "La hora de correr" (julio de 1984) Alan Moore cita "La noche del cazador" de James Agee, y entendemos que, de hecho, los miedos infantiles son innombrables, son cosas oscuras que apenas pueden ser entendidas.Como habíamos visto antes, Paul había sido testigo de la llegada del Rey Mono, una criatura capaz de despertar los miedos más profundos de la gente, mientras el miedo prevalezca, este monstruo de pesadilla se hará más fuerte. Cuando Vince, un adolescente desnudo, ataca a Abby, ella entiende que algo terrible está sucediendo en los Jardines Elíseos. Tal como concluye Abigail: "Solía pensar que conocía el miedo... No era así. Todo lo que conocía eran los suburbios del miedo... y ahora aquí estoy, en la gran ciudad". "Conducido por demonios" (agosto de 1984) nos lleva directamente al corazón del conflicto, mientras Swamp Thing y el demonio Etrigan batallan contra el Rey Mono. El heraldo del diablo no es rival contra un monstruo que se nutre del miedo, y Swamp Thing, aunque inmune a los poderes de la bestia blanca, no puede hacer nada para detenerlo. Al final, sólo la inocencia infantil de Paul podrá derrotar al Rey Mono. By Demons Driven / Conducido por demoniosLa poesía de Moore está en cada página. Es un maestro tanto del contenido como del estilo. Su vocabulario complejo complementa el ritmo de sus frases; sus inusuales sinécdoques y sus metáforas increíblemente creativas agregan significado y profundidad a una saga ya de por sí fascinante. Por lo tanto, solamente un equipo creativo tan talentoso como el formado por Stephen R. Bissette y John Totleben podía hacerle justicia al guión de Moore. Sus técnicas son similares al estilo de Francisco de Goya y otros artistas del romanticismo. Cuando los personajes corren por sus vidas, tenemos una superficie ajada, sin acabados suaves, y al mismo tiempo tenemos detalles exquisitamente pintados.Los colores de Tatjana Wood también ayudan a Bissette y Totleben, el rojo en la sangre de las víctimas es como púrpura oscura, escarlata embarrada en tinta espesa, se ve quebradiza y con relieves, tal como se vería la sangre de verdad. Con unos cuantos gestos del pincel, Totleben transforma los lápices de Bissette en la más sublime expresión de arte. Una y otra vez, ambos artistas nos regalan momentos de inconsolable pathos.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/08/saga-of-swamp-thing-25-26-27-moore.html


Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 9

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 10

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 11

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 12
How To Sell Superheroes To Children

How To Sell Superheroes To Children

By David Bird in Blog on August 18, 2012

There comes a time when all bloggers feel the need to tell the comics industry how to save itself from any number of problems and concerns.Originally Published at Power Honor Grace http://powerhonorgrace.tumblr.com/post/29689507893


Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 9

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 10

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 11

Notice: Undefined offset: 0 in /home/theouth/public_html/templates/OuthouseDeux/html/com_content/common/LOLtron.php on line 12
How To Sell Superheroes To Children

How To Sell Superheroes To Children

By David Bird in Blog on August 18, 2012

There comes a time when all bloggers feel the need to tell the comics industry how to save itself from any number of problems and concerns.Originally Published at Power Honor Grace http://powerhonorgrace.tumblr.com/post/29689507893

My Pull List

My Pull List

By David Bird in Blog on July 2, 2012

I haven't posted a pull list in a while. Here's what I am picking up at my local comics shop: Alabaster: WolvesB.P.R.D.CasanovaCourtney CrumrinDarkhorse PresentsFataleFatimaMind MGNTMouse GuardManhattan ProjectsProphetRaslSpacemanWorld's FinestAlso on my pull list are: Infinite Vacation (Which hasn't lived up to the promise of the first two issues, but only has one issue left. Eventually.)Hellboy (Hellboy in Hell. Coming the end of 2012.)And, if they should ever seen print again: FellLiberty MeadowsAnd here's what I am getting at Comixology: Digital comics: Ame-ComiDouble BarrelLegends of the Dark KnightOlder titles that I picking up an issue (or two) per week--and the next issue I'll be picking up: Robin #24-25 (the 1993-2009 run)Doom Patrol #22 (Morrison's run)Chase #2I also pick up older arcs. My next will be Batman: Prey, starting in Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #11. The only current, non-digital, series I am getting is Rachel Rising. I've gotten the first two issue and will get issue three this week. My digital comics day is Monday.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

My Pull List

My Pull List

By David Bird in Blog on July 2, 2012

I haven't posted a pull list in a while. Here's what I am picking up at my local comics shop: Alabaster: WolvesB.P.R.D.CasanovaCourtney CrumrinDarkhorse PresentsFataleFatimaMind MGNTMouse GuardManhattan ProjectsProphetRaslSpacemanWorld's FinestAlso on my pull list are: Infinite Vacation (Which hasn't lived up to the promise of the first two issues, but only has one issue left. Eventually.)Hellboy (Hellboy in Hell. Coming the end of 2012.)And, if they should ever seen print again: FellLiberty MeadowsAnd here's what I am getting at Comixology: Digital comics: Ame-ComiDouble BarrelLegends of the Dark KnightOlder titles that I picking up an issue (or two) per week--and the next issue I'll be picking up: Robin #24-25 (the 1993-2009 run)Doom Patrol #22 (Morrison's run)Chase #2I also pick up older arcs. My next will be Batman: Prey, starting in Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #11. The only current, non-digital, series I am getting is Rachel Rising. I've gotten the first two issue and will get issue three this week. My digital comics day is Monday.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

Rave Ups:  It Still Moves by Amanda Petrusich

Rave Ups: It Still Moves by Amanda Petrusich

By in Blog on June 26, 2012

Published by Faber & Faber in 2008, It Still Moves is one part road trip dairy, one part cultural study, and one part musicological thesis.  The author Amanda Petrusich a contributing writer for Pitchfork.com and tons of other music publications.  She has also written one other book:  Pink Moon (about the classic Nick Drake album of the same name) as a part of the 33 1/3 series by Continuum Books.  I found her writing to be well thought out, organized, and meticulously researched.  She uses a well planned road trip to a string of important musical destinations as a vehicle to parcel the more historical/factual info in as a story.   The travel portion of the book does come off as a little forced at times, as she very obviously tried to make the best of a few of the less than inspirational experiences at a few of the featured locations.  Overall the book does a wonderful job at delivering a full/wide view of American Music, hitting all the cornerstones of what “Americana” is thought of, including The Blues, Country, Folk, and the more recent interpretations and combinations of the those styles. The book is composed of 17 parts including an introduction and epilogue. Here is a rough guide to what they cover: Intro – Just that, acts to identify what the book is going to try to accomplish which is mainly to discover just what “Americana” is. Chapter 1 – Examination of the American Highway, and how that relates to American music. Chapter 2 – Focuses on the history of the Blues kicked off with a visit to Beale Street in Memphis Tennessee. Chapter 3 – Sam Phillips, Sun Records, and the birth of Rock N Roll also in Memphis. Chapter 4 – Elvis Presley and his impact on popular music with a visit to Graceland. Chapter 5 – Further examination of the Blues through travels to Clarksdale Mississippi. Chapter 6 – Country music by way of Nashville Tennessee. Chapter 7 – Alternative Country Chapter 8 – Continued travels through Virginia and Kentucky. Chapter 9 – Minstrel shows and early radio. Chapter 10 – Appalachian folk music, The Carter Family, and early Country music. Chapter 11 – Americana by way of Cracker Barrel. Chapter 12 – John Lomax, Leadbelly, Moses Asch, and Folkways Records. Chapter 13 – Harry Smith’s Anthology of American Folk Music and Smithsonian Folkways. Chapter 14 – Woody Guthrie, Ramblin’ Jack Elliot, and the Folk revival of the 1960s. Chapter 15 – Independent Folk. Epilogue – Continued ruminations on the definition of Americana. The driving question here is “What is Americana?”, which I think is an important one to ask.   Although I’m not sure the book fully answers it, then again I’m not sure any book can or should try.  Americana, at least when it relates to music, is just one of those terms that is too complicated to define.  Whenever you are trying to precisely define a label that is used as a shortcut to describe an art form you inevitably will get your self into trouble.  It is a journal full of pitfalls, contradictions,  and personal opinion.  Although I personally often fall back on the genre/sub-genre/style labels in my writing, I try not to be restrictive with my labels when setting something in stone.  Take Neil Young for instance, can you really say he is strictly a “country-rock” artist?  If you do, you are completely omitting all of his work that does not exactly fit into that label.  I prefer to keep it simple and classify things in general terms like Pop/Rock. Just for fun here is a link to the Webster Dictionary definition of Americana. I would also like to offer a playlist of music that is directly mentioned in the book or inspired by the books subject. Originally Pubished at:

PHG Reviews

PHG Reviews

By David Bird in Blog on May 27, 2012

I haven't been doing a lot of reviews lately, but I have posted a couple on my tumblr account, Power Grace Honor. The first was for Courtney Crumrin Vol. 1: The Night Things - Special Edition and the second for World’s Finest #1. I hope to have one up for the Fable's trade, Cinderella: Fables Are Forever soon.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

PHG Reviews

PHG Reviews

By David Bird in Blog on May 27, 2012

I haven't been doing a lot of reviews lately, but I have posted a couple on my tumblr account, Power Grace Honor. The first was for Courtney Crumrin Vol. 1: The Night Things - Special Edition and the second for World’s Finest #1. I hope to have one up for the Fable's trade, Cinderella: Fables Are Forever soon.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

PHG Reviews

PHG Reviews

By David Bird in Blog on May 27, 2012

I haven't been doing a lot of reviews lately, but I have posted a couple on my tumblr account, Power Grace Honor. The first was for Courtney Crumrin Vol. 1: The Night Things - Special Edition and the second for World’s Finest #1. I hope to have one up for the Fable's trade, Cinderella: Fables Are Forever soon.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

The Outhouse is not responsible for any butthurt incurred by reading this website. All original content copyright the author. Banner by Ali Jaffery - he's available for commission!