Tuesday, November 25, 2014 • Evening Edition • "If you loved Hotel Rwanda, you'll love The Outhouse."
Gabinete de dibujos - Galería Pepe Cobo

Gabinete de dibujos - Galería Pepe Cobo

By Arion in Blog on March 12, 2014

Click to enlargeYears ago, Marvel Comics announced that they had bought the publication rights of Marvelman, perhaps the most iconic superhero of the United Kingdom. Although the value of the character wasn’t circumscribed to his historical roots, but rather to Alan Moore’s brilliant reinterpretation of the classic superhero. In the past 5 years many lost faith and wondered if we would actually get to see the reprinting of Moore’s run, and from 2008 to 2013 nothing happened, until finally Miracleman # 1 appeared in the solicitations of January 2014. Although I own the first 5 issues published by Eclipse Comics in the 80s, I must say I was thrilled to find out that they would restoring the original art and also adding extras (such as Garry Leach’s sketches, Warrior covers, etc.). In fact, Marvel has included stories that were never printed by Eclipse (e.g. Yesterday’s Gambit in Miracleman # 1, written by Moore and with art by Steve Dillon and Alan Davis). I must also say that I’m surprised at the high quality level of Marvel’s edition. The recoloring is impeccable and allows us to distinguish details that were lost in the original Eclipse version. Since I’ve already reviewed the first issues of Miracleman, I thought it would be interesting for you to compare the old versus the new pages. So I forthwith present you with 4 Miracleman pages which appeared on the first issue. Click HERE to see it. And in case someone wants to read a fascinating article about coloring techniques in the 80s and computer coloring in the present, please click HERE. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Luego de algunos meses de reposo la Galería Pepe Cobo contraataca y tomo por asalto la escena de arte limeña. En esta ocasión “Gabinete de dibujos” reúne obras de Borofsky, Fernando Bryce, Condo, Dokoupil, Espaliú, Förg, Freymann, Giacometti, Jacoby, Mangold, Mullican, Muñoz, Picabia, Polke, Schuyff, Thek, Trockel, Villar Rojas y Andy Warhol. Rara vez en Lima se puede apreciar una colectiva con artistas de semejante magnitud. Yo, particularmente, quedé fascinado por los 4 dibujos de Andy Warhol, dos en formato pequeño a un costo de 10,500 dólares cada uno, y dos en formato grande a 40,000 dólares cada uno. Sin duda, los mejores son estos últimos que, por cierto, pertenecen a la serie Male Nudes, es decir, desnudos masculinos, y que en este caso reproducen la desnudez de un modelo masculino desde el cuello hacia la zona pélvica y en el otro cuadro desde el torso hacia las piernas (abarcando, desde luego, las nalgas y el ano). Los desnudos de Warhol son, sin duda, una fascinante mirada hacia el arte homoerótico incipiente del siglo pasado, y merecen ser vistos con toda nuestra atención. Yo, al menos, confronté estos cuadros al menos por media hora. Son realmente una maravilla.En la misma noche se inauguró “Inversiones” de Sergio Fernández, en la Galería Lucía de la Puente. Allí me encontré con Mariella Agois (quien luego me acompañó hasta Pepe Cobo), Dare Dovidjenko y mis grandes amigos Hugo Salazar y Tomás Prochazka; también conversé con Rebeca Vaisman y Hugo Alegre. Por supuesto, también aproveché para darme una vuelta por la Galería Wu Ediciones y quedé encantado con la muestra “Laguna” de Ignacio Álvaro. Allí me encontré con Daniel Paz Parodi y varios amigos más. Sin duda, esta fue una noche magnífica, llena de diversión y que, ojalá, se repita próximamente.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/03/gabinete-de-dibujos-galeria-pepe-cobo.html

February Comic Books / Cómics de febrero

February Comic Books / Cómics de febrero

By Arion in Blog on March 10, 2014

What a fantastic month for comic books! I loved the Bojeffries Saga GN, I had been wanting to read it for years and now that I did, I must say it lived up to my expectations and in fact surpassed them. I’m quite satisfied with the first issues of All New Invaders and New Warriors (part, as you may have guessed, of All New Marvel Now). Since I no longer buy The Walking Dead I was very relieved to get my fix of zombie thrills in George A. Romero’s Empire of the Dead. Image’s Deadly Class #1 was quite an interesting first chapter and with great art. Miracleman continues to surprise me not only because it’s one of the best Alan Moore runs but also due to the high quality of Marvel’s edition. And this month I have a tie for best single issues (printed in 2014): Unwritten Apocalypse #1 and Thor God of Thunder #18 (Das Pastoras is the best!). Truly extraordinary issues. And now, without further ado, here are February comics as per solicitations.  ALL NEW INVADERS #1 (W) James Robinson (A) Steve Pugh (CA) Mukesh Singh 'GODS AND SOLDIERS' PART ONE • Eisner Award winner James Robinson (STARMAN, EARTH 2) returns to MARVEL, uniting with Steve Pugh (ANIMAL MAN, HOTWIRE, GEN-X) to create a unique, modern day take on the INVADERS. • The KREE EMPIRE intends to conquer the universe using a weapon that will grant them an army of NORSE GODS. • It falls to four heroes united by their past-CAPTAIN AMERICA, NAMOR, THE ORIGINAL HUMAN TORCH and the WINTER SOLDIER-who must now face the future and wage war against the Kree to save Earth. ALL NEW X-FACTOR #2 (W) Peter David (A) Carmine Di Giandomenico (CA) Jared K. Fletcher. 'NOT BRAND X' Part 2 X-FACTOR IS BACK…LIKE NEVER BEFORE! Serval Industries, one of the world's most trusted names in electronics and leader in cutting-edge internet and weapons technology, has just unveiled their newest contribution to society…the All-New X-Factor. Led by mutant mistress of magnetism, Polaris, the team uses its corporate backing for the betterment of society. With her half-brother Quicksilver, notorious thief, Gambit, and more by her side, can Polaris trust that her corporate masters really have good intentions? BOJEFFRIES SAGA GN (MR) (C: 1-0-2) (W) Alan Moore (A/CA) Steve Parkhouse. Jobremus Bojeffries is like any other father - trying to keep the peace in a house stuffed with two kids (Ginda and Reth), uncles Raoul and Festus, a baby and old Grandpa Podlasp. Never mind that one's a werewolf, one's a vampire, Grandpa is in the last stages of organic matter, and the baby puts off enough thermonuclear energy to power England and Wales. All right, they're no ordinary family. And this is no ordinary book, with stories spanning decades, a whole chapter written as light opera, a Christmas episode, and an all-new 24-page comic bringing the Bojeffries up to the present day. On every page, the wry and anarchic creativity of the creators shines through: Alan Moore's affectionate and penetrating grasp of human nature (and British culture) creates a kind of desperate poignancy in the characters, brought to memorable life by Steve Parkhouse's deft and articulate line work. It's all there, untutored, unpolished, ramshackle and always on the edge of collapse.  DEADLY CLASS #1 (MR) (W) Rick Remender (A/CA) Wesley Craig, Lee Loughridge. It's 1987. Marcus Lopez hates school. His grades suck. He has no money. The jocks are hassling his friends. He can't focus in class, thanks to his mind constantly drifting to the stunning girl in the front row and the Dag Nasty show he has tickets to. But the jocks are the children of Joseph Stalin's top assassin, the teachers are members of an ancient league of assassins, the class he's failing is 'Dismemberment 101,' and his crush, a member of the most notorious crime syndicate in Japan, has a double-digit body count. Welcome to the most brutal high school on Earth, where the world's top crime families send the next generation of assassins to be trained. Murder is an art. Killing is a craft. At King's Dominion High School for the Deadly Arts, the dagger in your back isn't always metaphorical, nor is your fellow classmates' poison. Join writer RICK REMENDER with rising star WESLEY CRAIG (Batman) and legendary colorist LEE LOUGHRIDGE (Fear Agent) to reminisce about the mid-1980s underground through the eyes of the most damaged and dangerous teenagers on Earth. DEADPOOL GAUNTLET #1 Deadpool has tangled with vampires before, but is he ready…to work for them?! • Dracula has a very important package he needs delivered safely, so he hires the Merc with the Mouth to get the job done! GEORGE ROMEROS EMPIRE OF DEAD ACT ONE #1 (OF 5) (W) George A. Romero (A/CA) Alex Maleev ZOMBIE GODFATHER GEORGE ROMERO UNLEASHES HIS NEXT UNDEAD EPIC-AS AN ALL-NEW MARVEL COMIC! • Welcome to New York City years after the undead plague has erupted-but just because Manhattan has been quarantined, don't think that everyone inside is safe! • Not only do flesh-eaters roam within Manhattan, but there's another ancient predator about to take a bite out of the Big Apple! • Plus: It's a terrorizing team-up in variant cover form when the Zombie Godfather unites with the Zombie King - Arthur Suydam! KICK-ASS 3 #6 (OF 8) (MR) (W) Mark Millar (A/CA) John Romita. It's the flashback issue you've all been waiting for: The secret origin of Hit-Girl! Training, first blood, and of course, lots of hugs and positive reinforcement from Big Daddy. Exactly how does little Mindy McCready earn her assassin stripes? Hint: It ain't by collecting stickers. This issue will be extra-sized for extra awesome! MIRACLEMAN #2 (W) TBD, Mick Anglo (A) Various (CA) Alan Davis • KIMOTA! With one magic word, a long-forgotten legend lives again! • Freelance reporter Michael Moran always knew he was meant for something more -- now, a strange series of events leads him to reclaim his destiny! • Relive the ground-breaking eighties adventures that captured lightning in a bottle -- or experience them for the first time -- in these digitally restored, fully relettered editions! • Issue #2 includes material originally presented in WARRIOR #1-5, plus bonus material. NEW WARRIORS #1 (W) Christopher Yost (A) Marcus To (CA) Ramon K. Perez. WARRIORS REBORN! Adventurers SPEEDBALL and JUSTICE have come together with a group of young heroes including NOVA, SUN GIRL, and HUMMINGBIRD (and even a couple of new faces) to stop the latest threat to the Marvel Universe-the Atlanteans, Inhumans, clones and hundreds of other so-called 'superior' beings are living among the humans of the Marvel Universe, but not everyone is pleased about it. THE HIGH EVOLUTIONARY has raised an army to combat the evolution of humanity - and the New Warriors are locked in his sights! SIDEKICK #5 CVR A MANDRAKE & HIFI (MR) (W) J. Michael Straczynski (A/CA) Tom Mandrake,  HiFiFor weeks, super-villain Julia Moonglow has been feeding off the body and energy of Barry 'Flyboy' Chase while keeping him from remembering this. Now she's ready to let him remember, and reveals why she's been stalking him and the fate of her late twin sister. But that's just the warm-up for the big reveal, as Barry learns for the first time that the Red Cowl may be alive, a discovery that shatters him down to his very core. THOR GOD OF THUNDER #18 (W) Jason Aaron (A) Das Pastoras (CA) Esad Ribic • A tale of Young Thor, in the age of the Vikings. Here be a dragon. 'Nuff said. UNWRITTEN VOL 2 APOCALYPSE #1 (W) Mike Carey (A) Peter Gross (CA) Yuko Shimizu It's the perfect jumping on point, as Tom Taylor is stranded at the beginning of all creation! Lost in the unwritten scenes of all the world's stories, Tom Taylor is headed back to reality - and all the gods and beasts and monsters ever imagined can't stop him. But there's a toll on the road that may be too high for him or anyone to pay… UNWRITTEN VOL 2 APOCALYPSE #2 (MR) (W) Mike Carey (A) Peter Gross (CA) Yuko Shimizu. In the ruins of a post-literary world, Richie and Lizzie go in search of their lost friend Tom Taylor. But to find him, they'll have to venture into the most dangerous place on Earth: London. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________¡Un mes lleno de cómics fantásticos! Me encantó Bojeffries Saga, había estado esperando leer esto por años y debo decir que sí estuvo a la altura de mis expectativas y que de hecho las superó. Estoy bastante satisfecho con los primeros números de All New Invaders y New Warriors (parte, como habrán adivinado, de All New Marvel Now). Como ya no compro The Walking Dead me sentí muy aliviado de recibir mi dosis de zombis en Empire of the Dead de George A. Romero. Deadly Class #1 de Image fue un primer capítulo bastante interesante y con un muy buen arte. Miracleman continúa sorprendiéndome no sólo porque es una de las mejores etapas de Alan Moore sino también por la óptima calidad de la edición de Marvel. Y este mes hay un empate para el mejor número único (impreso en el 2014): Unwritten Apocalypse #1 y Thor God of Thunder #18 (¡Das Pastoras es lo máximo!). Números realmente extraordinarios. Y ahora, sin más preámbulos, aquí están los cómics de febrero. ALL NEW INVADERS #1Comentario: El imperio KREE intenta conquistar el universo usando un arma que les garantizará un ejército de dioses nórdicos. Ahora, los héroes del pasado (CAPTAIN AMERICA, NAMOR, la Antorcha Humana original y WINTER SOLDIER) deben reunirse y luchar para salvar al mundo.ALL NEW X-FACTOR #2Comentario: ¿Podrá POLARIS confiar en las buenas intenciones de su medio hermano QUICKSILVER y en GAMBIT, el notorio ladrón?BOJEFFRIES SAGA GN (MR)Comentario: JOBREMUS BOJEFFRIES es como cualquier otro padre, intentando mantener la paz en una casa atiborrada de dos chicos, dos tíos, un bebé y un abuelo. Sin contar con que uno de ellos es un hombre lobo, el otro es un vampiro, el abuelo está en las últimas fases de la materia orgánica, y el bebé tiene suficiente energía termonuclear como para darle electricidad a toda Inglaterra y Gales. Está bien, no son una familia ordinaria. DEADLY CLASS #1 (MR)Comentario: Es 1987. Marcus odia el colegio. Tiene malas notas. No tiene plata. Los deportistas fastidian a sus amigos. No puede concentrarse en clase gracias a la preciosa chica que se sienta en primera fila. Pero los deportistas son los hijos del asesino principal de Stalin, los profesores son miembros de una antigua liga de asesinos, la clase que está a punto de desaprobar es ‘Desmembramiento’, y la chica es parte del sindicato del crimen de Japón. Bienvenidos a la secundaria más brutal de la Tierra, donde las principales familias del crimen del mundo envían a la próxima generación de asesinos para que sean entrenados. Aquí el asesinato es un arte, y la matanza una ciencia.GEORGE ROMEROS EMPIRE OF DEAD ACT ONE #1 (OF 5)Comentario: Bienvenidos a New York años después de que la plaga de los muertos vivientes ha empezado. Pero aunque Manhattan ha sido puesta en cuarentena, eso no significa que la gente se haya salvado. my drawing / mi dibujoKICK-ASS 3 #6 (OF 8) (MR)Comentario: ¡El origen secreto de HIT-GIRL! Entrenamiento, sangre y por supuesto un montón de abrazos y buenos deseos de parte de BIG DADDY. ¿Qué exactamente hace una niña para ganarse el título de asesina? MIRACLEMAN #2Moran siempre supo que estaba destinado a algo más… ahora, una extraña serie de eventos lo llevan a reclamar su destino.NEW WARRIORS #1Comentario: Los aventureros SPEEDBALL y JUSTICE reúnen a un grupo de jóvenes héroes, incluyendo a NOVA, SUN GIRL y HUMMINGBIRD (y un par de caras nuevas) para detener la más reciente amenaza… el Alto Evolucionario ha formado un ejército para combatir la evolución de la humanidad.SIDEKICK #5 CVR A MANDRAKE & HIFI (MR)Comentario: Durante semanas, una villana se ha estado alimentando del cuerpo y la energía de Barry Chase (FLYBOY) y borrando sus recuerdos. Ahora está lista para devolverle su memoria y revelar por qué lo ha estado acosando. Pero la mayor revelación será descubrir que RED COWL sigue vivo.THOR GOD OF THUNDER #18Comentario: Un relato de un joven Thor, en la era de los vikingos.UNWRITTEN VOL 2 APOCALYPSE #1Comentario: Tom Taylor está perdido en el principio de la creación. Perdido en las escenas no escritas de todas las historias del mundo, hasta que se dirige a la realidad. Y ni todas las bestias ni monstruos imaginados lo podrán detener.UNWRITTEN VOL 2 APOCALYPSE #2 (MR)Comentario: En las ruinas de un mundo post-literario, ellos darán inicio a la búsqueda de Tom Taylor. Pero para encontrarlo tendrán que aventurarse en el lugar más peligroso de la Tierra: Londres.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/03/february-comic-books-comics-de-febrero.html

Legion Worlds # 1-6 - Abnett, Lanning, Cassaday et al

Legion Worlds # 1-6 - Abnett, Lanning, Cassaday et al

By Arion in Blog on March 6, 2014

John CassadayEarth is not the center of the universe. And Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning never forget this. There are, indeed, many other planets out there. After the catastrophic events that led to “Legion Lost”, the British writers had many questions: what happened on Earth during the legionnaire’s absence? How did the galaxy change in those 12 months? How did the remaining legionnaires feel about losing so many close friends? Abnett and Lanning decided to answer those questions in Legion Worlds.Each chapter of Legion Worlds revolves around one legionnaire and one world, to strengthen the concept of interplanetary incursion, all the covers of this 6 issue miniseries –drawn by the extraordinary John Cassaday, a very talented artist that was producing some amazing covers for DC back then– play with spherical shapes and with a galactic navigation chart that marks which planet we are observing. The covers are fantastic, Cassaday captures M’Onel’s melancholy, Spark’s sadness, Cosmic Boy’s bravery, Star Boy’s fear, Karate Kid’s rage and Timber Wolf’s savagery. “You Are Here: Earth” (Legion Worlds # 1, June 2001), the first chapter, chronicles one day in the life of M’Onel. And in that day, we see Metropolis and Earth, and how people have lost their optimism. Everything has changed. Everyone assumed that the lost legionnaires were actually dead, this caused the ruin of Earth’s president –and Legion benefactor– RJ Brande, and soon Leland McCauley was elected as the new president of the world. He immediately disbanded what was left of the Legion and decided to hire M’Onel as the one and only protector of the Solar System. At first, this scenario might seem familiar to some readers, after all, in Frank Miller’s “The Dark Knight Returns”, a despotic president decided to ban all superheroes, except for the strongest and most powerful of them all: Superman. But here, M’Onel has a very tense relationship with Leland, he obeys only because he wants to save lives, but he’s in no way a government slave as Superman was portrayed in the classic 80s limited series. Abnett and Lanning explore the similitudes between Superman and M’Onel, both immensely powerful heroes –in fact, as a Daxamite, M’Onel has exactly the same powers of a Kryptonian, although he is immune to kryptonite–, they are idealistic, noble and generous, but they both bow before a superior power –political power– and, willingly or not, they follow presidential orders. But the Daxamite knows, deep down, that he can’t keep working for the government. John CassadayIt’s been an entire year without the Legion, and a disheartened M’Onel visits the monument that commemorates his fallen comrades. It’s there where he finds Triad, and she suggests that M’Onel should reclaim his messianic role, and be once again not only Earth’s greatest hero but the galaxy’s savior. Yvel Guichet and Dexter Vines draw some really dynamic action sequences, but they are also good in more calm and introspective moments, like M’Onel’s visit to the monument.In subsequent issues, we see how other planets have been deeply affected by the United Planets inefficiency. Winath, a planet devoted to agriculture, can no longer export their food, and thus some farmer families are bankrupted and others are barely able to subsist. It is in this scenario where we find Spark, now that the Legion has been disbanded, she has returned to her homeworld. Abnett and Lanning intensify, in a just a handful of pages, a sense of failure and disappointment. Spark has run out of options, just in the same way that her planet is running out of money. She is not returning to the paradise of her childhood but rather to a hopeless and bitter reality. Artist Enrique Breccia strongly transmits all these feelings, and provides a very down-to-earth approach to Winath. Spark finds her father crippled due to a farming accident, and she also runs into her older brother, Lightning Lord; he’s no longer a tyrannical supervillain, but simply an exhausted man trying to keep the farm afloat. There are some truly brilliant moments in this story, as Spark understands how much his older brother suffered in a world entirely inhabited by twins; born without a sibling, her brother was always an outcast. And now that she has lost her twin brother, she’s also a ‘solo’, a freak, and slowly but surely, she feels the rejection of her neighbors. At moments, this tale feels like a nightmare, but it’s so firmly inserted into a normal, agrarian society, that it is terribly real and so very close to our 21st century.And as we go to different planets, we witness the social turmoil that other authors never touched upon in the pages of the Legion. Again, this isn’t the bright and chirpy future that was originally envisioned in the original Legion of Super-Heroes, back in the 50s. This is a different future, perhaps darker, perhaps more dangerous, but inevitably more complex than we could have anticipated. Braal, for instance, is a world plagued by hooligans, drug addicts and a high rate criminality.  John CassadayThis isn’t the Braal old readers could remember, a Braal in which happy families would go to the stadium to see a game of magnoball. Here, the magnetic sport is still popular, but it causes brutal fights between rival gangs; here, genetic drugs are destroying the lives of millions; and it’s also here where Magno discovers that a group of former legionnaires (Cosmic Boy, Invisible Kid, Bouncing Boy and Leviathan) are doing everything they can to return to Earth. Paul Rivoche, penciller and inker of this issue, surprises us with very imaginative designs and a vibrant and energetic approach to this alien world that seems very much inspired by a master like Jack Kirby. Truly wonderful art.Xanthu and other defenseless planets are being invaded, and the United Planets still remain inactive, incapable of helping their allies. Penciller Duncan Rouleau and inker Jaime Mendoza are in charge of this tale about Star Boy and Dreamer, who will have to prove their courage. Steve Dillon, in collaboration with Klaus Janson and John Stanisei, is the renowned artist responsible for Karate Kid's self-discovery journey and the battle he gets involved in. Finally, Kilian Plunkett portrays Rimbor and the misadventures of Timber Wolf and Apparition. And let’s not forget that every issue includes amazing backup tales written by Dan Abnett and illustrated by Olivier Coipel, Darwyn Cooke, Rick Burchett, Rick Leonardi, Jamie Tolagson and Mike McKone.Legion Worlds is an example of the best science fiction you could possibly find in a superhero book, as well as an extraordinary testimony of the heroes and planets that are barely surviving after a year without the Legion. With unbridled imagination and original reinventions, Abnett and Lanning once again resurrect our passion for the young heroes of the future. Long live the Legion!________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ M’Onel (Yvel Guichet)La Tierra no es el centro del universo. Y Dan Abnett y Andy Lanning nunca lo olvidan. Hay, ciertamente, muchos otros planetas. Después de los catastróficos eventos de “Legion Lost”, los escritores británicos tenían muchas preguntas: ¿qué pasó en la Tierra durante la ausencia de los legionarios? ¿Cómo cambió la galaxia en esos 12 meses? ¿Cómo se sintieron los legionarios restantes al perder a tantos amigos? Abnett y Lanning decidieron responder estas preguntas en “Legion Worlds”.Cada capítulo de “Legion Worlds” se centra en un legionario y en un mundo, para fortalecer el concepto de incursión interplanetaria, todas las portadas de esta miniserie de 6 números –dibujadas por el extraordinario John Cassaday, un artista muy talentoso que en ese entonces produjo portadas asombrosas para DC– juegan con formas esféricas y con una carta de navegación galáctica que marca el planeta al que observamos. Las portadas son fantásticas, Cassaday captura la melancolía de M’Onel, la tristeza de Spark, la valentía de Cosmic Boy, el miedo de Star Boy, la ira de Karate Kid y el salvajismo de Timber Wolf.“Estás aquí: la Tierra” (Legion Worlds # 1, junio 2001), el primer capítulo, es una crónica de un día en la vida de M’Onel. Y en ese día, vemos a Metrópolis y a la Tierra, y vemos cómo la gente ha perdido el optimismo. Todo ha cambiado. Muchos asumieron que los legionarios perdidos habían muerto, esto causó la ruina del presidente de la Tierra –y benefactor de la Legión– RJ Brande, y en poco tiempo Leland McCauley fue elegido como el nuevo presidente del mundo. Inmediatamente dispersó los miembros restantes de la Legión y decidió contratar a M’Onel como el único protector del sistema solar. Spark (Enrique Breccia)A simple vista, este escenario podría resultarle familiar a algunos lectores, después de todo, en “The Dark Knight Returns” de Frank Miller, un presidente déspota decide prohibir a todos los superhéroes, excepto al más fuerte y poderoso de todos: Superman. Pero aquí, M’Onel tiene una relación muy tensa con Leland, obedece sólo porque quiere salvar vidas, pero no es de ninguna manera un esclavo del gobierno como se retrató a Superman en la clásica serie limitada de los 80. Abnett y Lanning exploran las similitudes entre Superman y M’Onel, ambos héroes son inmensamente poderosos –de hecho, como daxamita, M’Onel tiene exactamente los mismos poderes de un kriptoniano, aunque es inmune a la kriptonita–, son idealistas, nobles y generosos, pero ambos se arrodillan ante un poder superior –poder político– y, voluntaria o involuntariamente, siguen órdenes presidenciales. Pero el daxamita sabe, en el fondo, que no seguirá trabajando para el gobierno.Ha pasado un año entero sin la Legión, y un afligido M’Onel visita el monumento que conmemora a sus camaradas caídos. Es allí donde encuentra a Triad, y ella sugiere que M’Onel reclame su rol mesiánico, y que sea una vez más no sólo el más grande héroe de la Tierra sino el salvador de la galaxia. Yvel Guichet y Dexter Vines dibujan algunas secuencias de acción realmente dinámicas, pero también son buenos en momentos más calmados e introspectivos, como la visita de M’Onel al monumento.En números subsiguientes, vemos cómo otros planetas han sido profundamente afectados por la ineficiencia de los Planetas Unidos. Winath, un planeta dedicado a la agricultura, ya no puede exportar sus alimentos, y por tanto algunas familias de granjeros están en bancarrota y otras apenas logran subsistir. Es en este escenario donde hallamos a Spark, ahora que la Legión ha sido dispersada, ella ha regresado a su hogar. Abnett y Lanning intensifican, en tan sólo un puñado de páginas, una sensación de fracaso y decepción. A Spark se le han acabado las opciones, al igual que el dinero se le está acabando a su planeta. Ella no está retornando al paraíso de su infancia sino más bien a una realidad amarga y sin esperanza.El artista Enrique Breccia transmite con fuerza todos estos sentimientos, y logra que Winath se sienta muy cercano a nosotros. Spark encuentra a su padre lisiado a causa de un accidente en la granja, y también ve a su hermano mayor, Lightning Lord; él ya no es un tiránico supervillano, sino simplemente un hombre exhausto que intenta mantener la granja a flote. Hay algunos momentos realmente brillantes en esta historia, cuando Spark entiende lo mucho que sufrió su hermano mayor en un mundo habitado completamente por mellizos; al no tener su 'par', él siempre fue un marginado. Y ahora que ella ha perdido a su mellizo, también está sola, también es un fenómeno, y lenta pero constantemente, siente el rechazo de los vecinos. Por momentos, este relato es como una pesadilla, pero está tan firmemente insertado en una sociedad agraria normal, que es terriblemente real y muy próximo a nuestro siglo XXI. Magno (Paul Rivoche)Al ir a planetas diferentes, somos testigos del caos social que otros autores nunca se atrevieron a abordar en las páginas de la Legión. De nuevo, este no es el futuro alegre y luminoso que fue propuesto originalmente, allá por los años 50. Este es un futuro diferente, tal vez más oscuro, tal vez más peligroso, pero inevitablemente más complejo de lo que podríamos haber anticipado. Braal, por ejemplo, es un mundo plagado por hooligans, drogadictos y altas tasas de criminalidad. Este no es el Braal que los viejos lectores podrían recordar, un Braal en el que familias felices iban al estadio a ver el juego de magnoball. Aquí, el deporte magnético aún es popular, pero causa peleas brutales entre pandillas rivales; aquí, las drogas genéticas están destruyendo las vidas de millones; y es también aquí donde Magno descubre que un grupo de ex legionarios (Cosmic Boy, Invisible Kid, Bouncing Boy y Leviathan) están haciendo todo lo que pueden para regresar a la Tierra. Paul Rivoche, el artista de este número, nos sorprende con diseños muy imaginativos y un enfoque vibrante y energético de este mundo extraterrestre que parece estar muy inspirado en maestros como Jack Kirby. Un arte auténticamente maravilloso. Xanthu y otros planetas indefensos están siendo invadidos, y los Planetas Unidos siguen inactivos, incapaces de ayudar a sus aliados. Duncan Rouleau (lápices) y Jaime Mendoza (tintas) están a cargo de este relato sobre Star Boy y Dreamer, quienes deberán demostrar su coraje. Steve Dillon, en colaboración con Klaus Janson y John Stanisei, es el renombrado artista responsable por el viaje de autodescubrimiento de Karate Kid y la batalla en la que se involucra. Finalmente, Kilian Plunkett retrata a Rimbor y las desventuras de Timber Wolf y Apparition. Y no olvidemos que cada número incluye asombrosas historias complementarias escritas por Dan Abnett e ilustradas por Olivier Coipel, Darwyn Cooke, Rick Burchett, Rick Leonardi, Jamie Tolagson y Mike McKone.“Legion Worlds” es un ejemplo de la mejor ciencia ficción que podrían encontrar en un título de superhéroes, y también es un extraordinario testimonio de los héroes y planetas que han sobrevivido con las justas después de un año sin la Legión. Con una imaginación desenfrenada y originales reinvenciones, Abnett y Lanning una vez más resucitan nuestra pasión por los jóvenes héroes del futuro. ¡Larga vida a la Legión!Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/03/legion-worlds-1-6-abnett-lanning.html

PREVIEW: FATHOM: KIANI vol 3 #1

PREVIEW: FATHOM: KIANI vol 3 #1

By Rui Esteves in Blog on March 4, 2014

Cover Kiani has risen!One of the most powerful figures in the Fathom universe returns for this epic third chapter! Following the tragic events of The Elite Saga and the shattering of her family ties, Kiani has risen above the surface and seemingly disappeared among the large expanse of the human population. However, with a power inside her that is capable of changing or destroying the world's landscape, her presence can only remain hidden for so long!Returning writer Vince Hernandez joins forces with Trish Out of Water artist Giuseppe Cafaro to bring you the latest adventures of Fathom's most fierce and beloved characters. Kiani is back and the world of the Blue will never be the same again!FATHOM: KIANI vol 3 #1 is in stores March 12th, 2014! Preview Page 1 Preview Page 2 Preview Page 3 Preview Page 4 Cover B Cover CFollow Reading Graphic Novels on Facebook and Twitter. Originally Published at Reading Graphic Novels http://readinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com/2014/03/preview-fathom-kiani-vol-3-1.html

Legion Lost # 9, 10, 11 12 - Abnett, Lanning Coipel

Legion Lost # 9, 10, 11 12 - Abnett, Lanning Coipel

By Arion in Blog on February 26, 2014

A superhuman, by definition, is different from us. And interaction in a superhuman community presents fascinating differences and challenges. For years, Saturn Girl and her people had been feared and discriminated due to their telepathic abilities. She trained all her life to hone her natural psychic abilities and she swore never to invade other people's minds. But in “Lost & Alone” (Legion Lost # 9, January 2001), her worst fears were realized. She betrayed the trust of her comrades by making them believe that they had been found by the Earth legionnaires. In fact, she had been tampering with her friends minds since the very beginning, by creating an illusion of Apparition. Olivier CoipelNow, without Apparition, an unstable Ultra Boy is at the brink of a nervous breakdown. Live Wire is angry and sad. And everyone is either furious, hurt or at the very least disappointed. As Chameleon asserts "we were going home. The nightmare was over. We had hope. And then it was gone and the truth was worse than it had been ever before". People trusted Apparition like they've never trusted Saturn Girl. Because you can't trust a telepath. Perhaps the only one that understands Saturn Girl is Brainiac 5. All this time, he had been busy building drives, engines and testing new and strange machinery. And it was all a lie. He didn’t know how to return to Earth, let alone where the solar system was. He confesses his frustration. With a superior intelligence he should be able to find a solution to the Legion's problems, but not this time. The task is too difficult, and he has come up empty-handed; for the first time in his life, the scientist, the genius, is lost. I've read superhero comics for almost 2 decades, and I've rarely found authors so bold and creative as Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning. In the pages of Legion Lost they create a dramatic structure that becomes more and more complex with each issue; they throw the Legion against insurmountable odds, and in the process they analyze the essence of these boys and girls. What are their strengths? And their weaknesses? And even better yet, they explore the nature of superpowers and how it affects relationships in a way that very few writers could even dream of. This is one of the finest examples of super-heroic narrative I can think of. They give each legionnaire a distinct personality; many scripters today have forgotten that superheroes are not simply colorful drawings with speech balloons attached to them. They must feel real, they have to act and react as people would, and that’s one of Abnett and Lanning’s many accomplishments. Yes, it's all about the characters. It's all about the conflict. It's all about the glory and misery of the human condition.Although chapter 9 is told from Saturn Girl’s perspective, in “Rosette” it’s Wildfire’s turn. And what an amazing episode that is. Even if Umbra is from Talok VIII, Chameleon from Durla and Brainiac 5 from Colu, these alien youngsters have been blessed with normal and healthy bodies. That’s not Wildfire’s case. He is a human mind forever trapped in a cloud of energy. He has no body, he doesn’t even have a human form, all he has is a containment suit that poorly resembles the figure of a man. He is still a teenager, though. He can’t stop thinking about girls. He has sexual desires and strong urges, but he’s not made of flesh, he is energy and light, and so he is forever doomed to ignore physical proximity, he’ll never experience a caress, a kiss or the joys of sexual intercourse. The British writers emphasize this fact in such a subtle way that we understand Wildfire, we admire him for his courage, his endurance, his inner force and because of all that, we do not pity him; on the contrary, we value his presence more than ever before.In the 10th issue of the miniseries, the Legion tries to fight against the Progeny armada. “I know we're finished. It's not that we're more outnumbered or outgunned that we've ever been. That never mattered before. It's that we're not a team anymore. We've come apart. [...] And that, plain and true, is why we're really lost”. After months of drifting away in an unknown region of space, after serious conflicts and tensions, after suffering from poor living conditions, the legionnaires are exhausted. They still put up a fight, but they’re easily subjugated. And finally, in Legion Lost # 11 –one of the best comics I’ve read in my life, along with issue # 9, and one that surely would deserve a place in a top 100 if ever manage to do one– all the plot threads converge in one ambitious and intense chronicle about immortality and how it can turn the very best and very noblest of men into cruel and inhuman individuals. “One Billion Years of Solitude” is an extraordinarily imaginative story that begins with one shocking reveal. The Progenitor, the creator of the Progeny, the man responsible for reducing entire worlds to ashes, the one guilty of genocide on a cosmic scale, is no other than Element Lad.  Olivier CoipelAs the legionnaires are taken to the Rosette, the center of the Progeny star-spanning empire, they meet the Progenitor. Element Lad looks at them and he can barely remember their names. And then he explains what happened after the Legion got lost. As we saw in the first issue, Element Lad used his powers to protect his friends in Tromium cocoons. But in the process of preserving the structural integrity of the Legion outpost, Element Lad made a mistake. He let go of the spaceship and then he was forced to spend decades, centuries and millennia floating alone, in the vacuum of space. Throughout all this time, he perfected and augmented his already significant powers. He changed and replaced his molecular elements with such precision that he became immortal. He watched the planets around him for millions of years, he witnessed the birth and death of many stars, till he accidentally landed on a planet. There he uses his complete dominion over the elements to create life. One billion years of solitude would be enough to destroy any normal human mind, and so Element Lad realizes that in order to survive he must find company and thus he creates intelligent life. Ernest Hemingway wrote once that “man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated”. And what happens to Element Lad is precisely that. He is completely and utterly destroyed, he loses his humanity, he forgets the life he had when he was just an idealistic boy in the ranks of the Legion. But he’s never defeated, not even for one second. Although the Progeny had informed Element Lad of the legionnaires presence months ago, he couldn’t remember who or what the Legion was. Slowly, and after considerable effort, he begins to reminisce his past. And thus he decides to grant them an audience. The legionnaires are now in shock. They can’t accept that the kind and sweet Element Lad is responsible for millions of years of atrocities. But Element Lad sees things differently. For him, all life is insignificant, brief, ephemeral. For someone who has existed longer than the first suns of the galaxy, it’s only logical to disregard life the way he does. Brainiac 5, of course, immediately understands how dangerous Element Lad has become, he is now “truly godlike. He’s not working on our level anymore”. And now that Element Lad has seen his old comrades, he remembers where they came from: Earth. And he knows that there’s a new galaxy where he can reign supreme as an immortal deity. Quickly, the legionnaires must assemble a plan. And they decide to release the Omniphagos –the same creature that was outsmarted by Brainiac 5–, the devourer of planets, an entity so powerful that can keep Element Lad distracted at least for a few minutes. And thus begins a carefully coordinated dance in which all legionnaires are in danger of death. But they must be successful or else they risk the destruction of everything they hold dear.Monstress is the first one to die at the hands of Element Lad. And it’s Live Wire –the narrator of “First & Last”, the final chapter– who manages to give the Legion the necessary seconds to escape using Element Lad’s inter-dimensional portal. Live Wire sacrifices his life to make sure that Element Lad and the Omniphagos will stay contained in this remote galactic region. With his last breath, Live Wire evokes the past. “I remember when we became the Legion of Super-Heroes. I’m glad I was there when we became it again. Because we weren’t lost at all, were we? Not where it counted”. Indeed, like I wrote in the first review a few days ago, getting lost can be a dreadful and scary thing. But we can be lost in more than one way. We can be physically but also psychologically lost, and throughout almost 300 brilliant pages, Abnett and Lanning have explored what exactly is to be lost, and how painful and terrible it can be. It’s thanks to this odyssey that, back in 2001, I found once more my passion for the 9th art, and it’s also thanks to Dan and Andy that I’ll never lose it again.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Saturn Girl & Brainiac 5Un superhumano, por definición, es diferente a nosotros. Y la interacción en una comunidad superhumana presenta diferencias y retos fascinantes. Por años, Saturn Girl y su pueblo habían sido temidos y discriminados a causa de sus habilidades telepáticas. Ella entrenó toda su vida para para mejorar sus habilidades psíquicas naturales y juró nunca invadir las mentes de otras personas. Pero en “Perdidos y solos” (Legion Lost # 9, enero 2001), sus peores miedos se hacen realidad. Ella traicionó la confianza de sus camaradas al hacerles creer que habían sido encontrados por los legionarios de la Tierra. De hecho, había estado manipulando las mentes de sus amigos desde el inicio, al crear la ilusión de Apparition.Ahora, sin Apparition, un inestable Ultra Boy está al borde de un colapso nervioso. Live Wire está enfadado y triste. Y todos están furiosos, heridos o por lo menos decepcionados. Como señala Chameleon "estábamos yendo a casa. La pesadilla había terminado. Teníamos esperanza. Y luego todo desapareció y la verdad era mucho peor de lo que había sido antes". La gente confiaba en Apparition como nunca habían confiado en Saturn Girl. Porque no se puede confiar en una telépata.Tal vez el único que entiende a Saturn Girl es Brainiac 5. Todo este tiempo, él ha estado ocupado construyendo motores, propulsores y probando nuevas y extrañas maquinarias. Y todo fue una mentira. No sabía cómo regresar a la Tierra, ni mucho menos dónde estaba el sistema solar. Confiesa su frustración. Con una inteligencia superior él debería ser capaz de solucionar los problemas de la Legión, pero esta vez no puede. La tarea es demasiado difícil, y no ha logrado nada; por primera vez en su vida, el científico, el genio, está perdido. WildfireHe leído cómics de superhéroes por casi 2 décadas, y rara vez he encontrado autores tan audaces y creativos como Dan Abnett y Andy Lanning. En las páginas de Legion Lost crean una estructura dramática que se vuelve más y más compleja con cada número; hacen que la Legión se enfrente contra obstáculos insuperables,  y en el proceso analizan la esencia de estos chicos y chicas. ¿Cuáles son sus fortalezas? ¿Y sus debilidades? Y además, de un modo con el que pocos escritores podrían soñar, ellos exploran la naturaleza de los súper poderes y cómo afectan las relaciones. Este es uno de los mejores ejemplos de narrativa súper-heroica en los que puedo pensar. Le dan a cada legionario una personalidad distinta; muchos guionistas de hoy se olvidan que los superhéroes no son simplemente dibujos coloridos con globos de diálogo. Deben sentirse reales, tienen que actuar y reaccionar como lo haría la gente, y ese es uno de los muchos logros de Abnett y Lanning. Sí, están los personajes. Está el conflicto. Están la gloria y la miseria de la condición humana.Aunque el capítulo 9 es contado desde la perspectiva de Saturn Girl, en “Rosette” el turno es de Wildfire. Y ese un episodio asombroso. Incluso si Umbra es de Talok VIII, Chameleon de Durla y Brainiac 5 de Colu, estos jovencitos de otros mundos han sido bendecidos con cuerpos normales y saludables. Ese no es el caso de Wildfire. Él es una mente humana atrapada para siempre en una nube de energía. No tiene cuerpo, ni siquiera tiene forma humana, lo único que tiene es un traje de contención que se asemeja pobremente a la figura de un hombre. Aunque todavía es un adolescente. No puede dejar de pensar en chicas. Tiene deseos sexuales y fuertes impulsos, pero no está hecho de carne sino de energía y luz, así que está condenado para siempre a  ignorar la proximidad física, nunca experimentará una caricia, un beso o los goces del coito. Los escritores británicos enfatizan este hecho de una manera tan sutil que entendemos a Wildfire, lo admiramos por su valentía, su resistencia, su fuerza interior y por todo ello, no lo compadecemos; por el contrario, valoramos su presencia más que nunca.En el décimo número de la miniserie, la Legión intenta pelear contra la armada de la Progenie. “Sé que estamos derrotados. No porque ellos nos superen en número o en armamento. Antes, algo así no tenía importancia. Lo que sucede es que ya no somos un equipo. Estamos divididos. [...] Y eso, ciertamente, es por lo que estamos realmente perdidos”. Después de meses de ir a la deriva en una región espacial desconocida, después de serios conflictos y tensiones, después de tantos padecimientos, los legionarios están exhaustos. Aun así luchan, pero son fácilmente subyugados.  Element Lad & MonstressY finalmente, en Legion Lost # 11 –uno de los mejores cómics que he leído en mi vida, junto con el 9, y uno que seguramente merecería un lugar en mi top 100 si alguna vez consigo hacer uno– todas las líneas argumentales convergen en una ambiciosa e intensa crónica sobre la inmortalidad y cómo puede convertir a los mejores y a los más nobles en individuos crueles e inhumanos. “Billón de años de soledad” es una historia extraordinariamente imaginativa que empieza con una impactante revelación. El Progenitor, el creador de la Progenie, el hombre responsable por reducir mundos enteros a cenizas, el culpable de genocidio a escala cósmica, no es otro que Element Lad. Los legionarios son llevados a la Rosette, el centro del imperio interestelar de la Progenie, allí ven al Progenitor. Element Lad los mira y apenas puede recordar sus nombres. Y luego explica qué pasó después de que la Legión se perdiera. Como vimos en el primer número, Element Lad usó sus poderes para proteger a sus amigos en crisálidas de Tromium. Pero en el proceso de preservar la integridad estructural del cuartel de la Legión, Element Lad cometió un error. Soltó la nave y luego fue obligado a pasar décadas, siglos y milenios flotando solo, en el vacío del espacio. A lo largo del tiempo, perfeccionó y aumentó sus poderes. Cambió y reemplazó sus elementos moleculares con tal precisión que se volvió inmortal. Miró a los planetas alrededor suyo por millones de años, fue testigo del nacimiento y la muerte de muchas estrellas, hasta que accidentalmente aterrizó en un planeta. Allí utiliza su completo dominio sobre los elementos para crear vida. Un billón de años de soledad serían suficiente para destruir cualquier mente humana normal, Element Lad se da cuenta de que para sobrevivir primero debe encontrar compañía, y por ello crea vida inteligente. Ernest Hemingway escribió alguna vez que “el hombre no está hecho para la derrota. Un hombre puede ser destruido pero no derrotado”. Y lo que sucede con Element Lad es precisamente eso. Él está completa y absolutamente destruido, pierde su humanidad, olvida la vida que tuvo cuando era un chiquillo idealista en las filas de la Legión. Pero nunca es derrotado, ni siquiera por un segundo.Aunque la Progenie había informado a Element Lad acerca de la presencia de los legionarios meses atrás, él no podía recordar quién o qué era la Legión. Lentamente, y después de un esfuerzo considerable, empieza a rememorar su pasado. Y por lo tanto decide concederles una audiencia. Live WireLos legionarios están en shock. No pueden aceptar que el amable y dulce Element Lad es responsable de millones de años de atrocidades. Pero Element Lad ve las cosas de manera diferente. Para él, toda vida es insignificante, breve, efímera. Para alguien que ha existido por más tiempo que los primeros soles de la galaxia, es lógico que desdeñe la vida de esa manera. Brainiac 5, por supuesto, entiende de inmediato lo peligroso que es Element Lad, ahora es “verdaderamente como un dios. Está muy por encima de nuestro nivel”. Y ahora que Element Lad ha visto a sus antiguos camaradas, recuerda de dónde vinieron: la Tierra. Y sabe que hay una nueva galaxia en la que puede reinar de manera suprema como una deidad inmortal. Rápidamente los legionarios deben armar un plan. Y deciden liberar al Omniphagos –la misma criatura que fue vencida por Brainiac 5–, el devorador de planetas, una entidad tan poderosa que puede mantener distraído a Element Lad al menos por unos minutos. Y así comienza una danza cuidadosamente coordinada en la que todos los legionarios están en peligro de muerte. Pero deben tener éxito o de lo contrario se arriesgan a la destrucción de todo lo que existe.Monstress es la primera en morir a manos de Element Lad. Y es Live Wire –el narrador de “Primero y último”, el capítulo final– quien se las arregla para darle a la Legión los segundos necesarios para escapar usando el portal inter-dimensional de Element Lad. Live Wire sacrifica su vida para asegurarse de que Element Lad y el Omniphagos sean contenidos en esta remota región galáctica. Con su último aliento, Live Wire evoca el pasado. “Recuerdo cuando nos convertimos en la Legión de Súper-Héroes. Estoy contento de haber estado allí cuando volvimos a convertirnos en ella. Porque no estábamos perdidos después de todo, ¿no es así? No donde más contaba”. De hecho, como escribí en la primera reseña hace algunos días, perderse puede ser algo terrible y temible. Pero podemos perdernos de más de un modo. Podemos estar perdidos física y también psicológicamente, y a lo largo de 300 brillantes páginas, Abnett y Lanning han explorado qué es exactamente estar perdido, y qué doloroso y terrible puede ser. Es gracias a esta odisea que, en el 2001, encontré una vez más mi pasión por el noveno arte, y es también gracias a Dan y Andy que nunca más la volveré a perder.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/legion-lost-9-10-11-12-abnett-lanning.html

Legion Lost # 5, 6, 7 8 - Abnett, Lanning Coipel

Legion Lost # 5, 6, 7 8 - Abnett, Lanning Coipel

By Arion in Blog on February 22, 2014

Olivier CoipelIf superheroes are an example of physical prowess, of muscular superiority, clearly it’s the role of the supervillains to represent intelligence, science and knowledge. It’s no coincidence that most golden era villains were mad scientists, it’s not accidental that the never-ending battle between Lex Luthor and Superman was, indeed, that of brain versus brawn. In fact, even in Watchmen, Ozymandias, the smartest man in the world, is the one that most closely resembles the figure of a villain.Certainly, for some reason, superheroes are a symbol of physical strength and their enemies are the embodiment of a superior intellect. Another classic example would be Brainiac, Superman’s nemesis. So it’s especially ironic to observe how, 1000 years in the future, Brainiac 5 –the descendant of the original Brainiac– joins the Legion of Super-Heroes.In “Omniphagos” (published in Legion Lost # 5, September 2000) Brainiac 5 must face an impossible challenge: an unnatural creature that can devour stars and even entire planets, thus increasing its strength exponentially. As the protagonist of this issue, Brainiac 5 shares his innermost thoughts. We see how he is trying to solve all the Legion’s problems: finding a way home, figuring out where home is, trying to survive in a region of the universe none of them are familiar with, etc. Even with his 12th level intelligence –the highest level of intelligence in the universe– he’s lost for the first time. The materials at hand, the technology they have stolen from the Progeny, all of it is insufficient for him to fully repair the Legion outpost or to manufacture a hyper drive. To make things worse, he’s now battling against a dangerous creature. Thanks to his cleverness, he overpowers this Omniphagos, this devourer of everything that exists. “Burnout”, told from Umbra’s perspective, is the beginning of a devastating situation. After such a long time imprisoned in the remains of the outpost, the legionnaires are sick, tired, angry and frustrated. But Umbra’s situation is even worse. As the champion of Talok VIII –her homeworld– she has trained all her life to control the shadow forces, but now that she is so far away from her galaxy, she’s constantly haunted by the silent wraiths of those who wielded the shadow force in the past. There is nothing she can do to ease her pain and fear. As she so admirably expresses it: “I have become afraid of the dark. And because I am the dark, I cannot escape my fear”. In an attempt to help her comrade, Saturn Girl tries to telepathically enter into her troubled psyche. But she only makes things worse. The psychic backlash is too ferocious, and Saturn Girl falls into a comma. At the same time, Umbra takes the only working escape pod and abandons her teammates. For her, the Legion no longer exists, it’s impossible to return to their galaxy, there is no hope.  Olivier CoipelAlthough Umbra has given up, the rest of the legionnaires haven’t. In “Singularity”, Ultra Boy and Monstress follow the warrior of Talok VIII to Lorcus Prime –a strange barren world that it’s supposed to be uninhabited, and yet has one huge city in the middle of a gigantic desert. There they find Singularity, Lorcus Prime’s sole protector, a superhuman figure of almost unlimited power who mistakes the legionnaires for alien invaders. This time, Ultra Boy is the narrator; arguably the most powerful of the group, he can barely stand against Singularity. But there is something else, something that doesn’t add up. If this planet is completely sterile, how can a vast metropolis survive in it? Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning weave an intricate web of deceitfulness. Because, as it becomes apparent to Ultra Boy, the city everyone sees doesn’t really exist. And yet, Singularity believes with all his heart that it does, and he is willing to sacrifice his life to protect this mirage. Furthermore, in an incredibly convenient way, the legionnaires that are supposed to be on Earth appear out of nowhere. That’s the premise of “Lost & Found”. Chameleon –this chapter’s narrator–, Monstress, Ultra Boy and everyone else enthusiastically welcome their friends. The only one suspicious is Brainiac 5. As a scientist, he needs a logical explanation, something to clarify how his comrades arrived. Cosmic Boy, Leviathan, Spark and Element Lad try to justify their journey across thousands of galaxies, but Brainiac 5 doesn’t believe their words. Having recovered their optimism, the young heroes finally defeat Singularity. And Brainiac 5 confirms that everything about Singularity had been an illusion. Although centuries ago he was the protector of Lorcus Prime, eventually, his civilization decided he was no longer needed. And so they sent him to an abandoned planet, and they made him believe he was still saving the capital city on a daily basis, fighting against countless –and fictitious– threats. It had all been a lie. Now that Umbra has been reunited with her teammates, Brainiac 5 is able to activate a device that should restore Saturn Girl’s consciousness. But once he does it, Cosmic Boy, Leviathan, Spark and Element Lad instantly vanish. They were illusions, psychic projections created by Saturn Girl’s subconscious. Her amazing mental powers had been more than enough to convince everyone that they had been, indeed, found. Perhaps they were easily persuaded as that was their heart’s greatest desire, but deep down, Brainiac 5 always knew the arrival of the Earth legionnaires was too good to be true. Abnett and Lanning’s amazing narrative skills manage to capture, in the first place, the frustration and anguish of Singularity, as he discovers that he had been living a lie for years. And then, after introducing the first moments of happiness, after showing that there was hope, comes the, shocking reveal. When the legionnaires understand that they’re still stuck in the outpost, they experiment horror and also hate towards Saturn Girl. As Chameleon declares “The truth of it all is too hard to bear. We are lost again. More than we ever were before… and in more ways than we ever thought we could be”. Brainiac 5As the main artist of the series, Olivier Coipel provides amazing and very dynamic pages. Although back then his style wasn’t as refined or as detailed as it is now, there is a strong, raw energy that emanates from his vibrant designs. Sometimes he looks a bit rough around the edges, but what he lacks in refinement more than makes up for in energetic imagery. The fill in artist in issue # 5 is Pascal Alixe; with equally fervent vitality, Pascal’s pencils are ideal for the savagery and craziness that takes place inside –and outside– Umbra’s mind. Tom McCraw’s coloring also contributed in adding strength to Coipel and Alixe’s illustrations. After 8 superb issues, Abnett, Lanning, Coipel and Alixe transformed a title nobody cared for into a fascinating saga. And they would keep on impressing us in future issues.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Si los superhéroes son un ejemplo de proeza física, de superioridad muscular, claramente el rol de los supervillanos es representar la inteligencia, la ciencia y el conocimiento. No es ninguna coincidencia que muchos de los villanos de la era dorada fuesen científicos locos, no es casual que la batalla sin fin entre Lex Luthor y Superman fuese, en realidad, la del cerebro versus el músculo. De hecho, incluso en "Watchmen", Ozymandias, el hombre más inteligente del mundo, es el que más se asemeja a la figura de un villano. Ciertamente, por alguna razón, los superhéroes son un símbolo de la fuerza física y sus enemigos son la encarnación de un intelecto superior. Otro ejemplo clásico sería Brainiac, el némesis de Superman. Así que es especialmente irónico observar cómo, 1000 años en el futuro, Brainiac 5 –descendiente del Brainiac original– se une a la Legión de Súper-Héroes.En “Omniphagos” (publicado en Legion Lost # 5, setiembre del 2000) Brainiac 5 debe enfrentar un desafío imposible: una criatura antinatural que puede devorar estrellas y planetas enteros, e incrementar su fuerza exponencialmente. Al ser el protagonista de este episodio, Brainiac 5 comparte sus pensamientos íntimos. Vemos cómo intenta solucionar todos los problemas de la Legión: encontrar el camino a casa, descifrar dónde está nuestro sistema solar, intentar sobrevivir en una región del universo que no le resulta familiar, etc. Incluso con su inteligencia de nivel 12 –el más alto nivel de inteligencia del universo– está perdido por primera vez. Los materiales a la mano, la tecnología que le han robado a la Progenie, nada de ello es suficiente para reparar el cuartel de la Legión o fabricar un híper-motor. Para empeorar las cosas, ahora él está combatiendo contra una peligrosa criatura. Gracias a su astucia, vence al Omniphagos, a este devorador de todo lo que existe. Ultra Boy versus Singularity“Fatiga extrema”, contada desde la perspectiva de Umbra, es el comienzo de una situación devastadora. Después de tanto tiempo de estar presos en los restos del cuartel, los legionarios están hartos, cansados, molestos y frustrados. Pero la situación de Umbra es incluso peor. Como campeona de Talok VIII –su mundo– ella ha entrenado toda su vida para controlar las fuerzas de la sombra, pero ahora está tan lejos de su galaxia, que está constantemente asediada por los silenciosos espectros de aquellos que portaron la fuerza de le sombra en el pasado. No hay nada que ella pueda hacer para aliviar su dolor y su miedo. Como expresa tan admirablemente: “Me he convertido en alguien temerosa de la oscuridad. Y como yo soy la oscuridad, no puedo escapar de mis miedos”. En un intento por ayudar a su camarada, Saturn Girl intenta entrar telepáticamente a su conflictuada psique. Pero sólo empeora las cosas. La reacción psíquica es demasiado feroz, y Saturn Girl cae en coma. Al mismo tiempo, Umbra se lleva la única cápsula de escape y abandona a sus compañeros. Para ella, la Legión ya no existe, es imposible retornar a casa, no hay esperanza.Aunque Umbra se ha rendido, el resto de los legionarios no. En “Singularidad”, Ultra Boy y Monstress siguen a la guerrera de Talok VIII hasta Lorcus Prime –un extraño mundo estéril que debería estar deshabitado, y no obstante allí hay una gigantesca ciudad en medio de un inmenso desierto. En ese lugar encuentran a Singularity, el protector de Lorcus Prime, una figura superhumana con poder casi ilimitado que confunde a los legionarios con invasores alienígenas. Esta vez, Ultra Boy es el narrador; probablemente el más poderoso del grupo, apenas puede hacerle frente a Singularity. Pero hay algo más, algo que no encaja. Si este planeta es completamente infértil, ¿cómo subsiste esta vasta metrópolis? Dan Abnett y Andy Lanning tejen una intrincada red de engaños. Porque, tal como Ultra Boy comprueba, la ciudad que todos ven no existe en realidad. Y no obstante, Singularity cree con todo su corazón que sí es real, y está dispuesto a sacrificar su vida para proteger este espejismo.  Chameleon, Brainiac 5 & Ultra Boy Más aún, de una manera increíblemente conveniente, los legionarios que supuestamente estaban en la Tierra aparecen de la nada. Esa es la premisa de “Perdido y encontrado”. Chameleon –el narrador de este capítulo–, Monstress, Ultra Boy y todos los demás les dan entusiásticamente la bienvenida a sus amigos. El único que sospecha es Brainiac 5. Como científico necesita una explicación lógica, algo que aclare cómo han llegado sus camaradas. Cosmic Boy, Leviathan, Spark y Element Lad intentan justificar su viaje a lo largo de miles de galaxias, pero Brainiac 5 no cree en sus palabras.Al recuperar su optimismo, los jóvenes héroes finalmente vencen a Singularity. Y Brainiac 5 confirma que todo sobre Singularity había sido una ilusión. Aunque hace siglos él era el protector de Lorcus Prime, eventualmente, su civilización decidió que ya no lo necesitaban. Así que lo enviaron a un planeta abandonado, y le hicieron creer que todavía estaba salvando la capital a diario, peleando contra incontables –y ficticias–  amenazas. Todo había sido una mentira.Ahora que Umbra se ha reunido con sus compañeros, Brainiac 5 es capaz de activar un mecanismo que restaurará la conciencia de Saturn Girl. Pero cuando lo hace, Cosmic Boy, Leviathan, Spark y Element Lad se desvanecen instantáneamente. Eran ilusiones, proyecciones psíquicas creadas por el inconsciente de Saturn Girl. Sus asombrosos poderes mentales habían sido más que suficientes para convencer a todos sobre la posibilidad de ser encontrados. Tal vez fueron persuadidos fácilmente ya que ese era su mayor deseo, pero en el fondo, Brainiac 5 siempre supo que la llegada de los legionarios de la Tierra era demasiado buena para ser verdad.Las asombrosas habilidades narrativas de Abnett y Lanning capturan, en primer lugar, la frustración y la angustia de Singularidad, cuando descubre que ha estado viviendo una mentira por años. Y luego, después de presentar los primeros momentos de felicidad, después de mostrar que aún había esperanza, llega la impactante revelación. Cuando los legionarios entienden que aún están varados en el cuartel, experimentan horror y también odio hacia Saturn Girl. Como declara Chameleon “La verdad de todo ello es demasiado difícil de tolerar. Estamos perdidos de nuevo. Más de lo que estábamos antes... y en más maneras de las podríamos pensar”.Como artista principal de la serie, Olivier Coipel realiza páginas asombrosas y muy dinámicas. Aunque en ese entonces su estilo no era tan refinado o tan detallado como lo es ahora, hay una energía fuerte, cruda, que emana de sus vibrantes diseños. A veces se ve un poco tosco, pero lo que le falta en refinamiento lo compensa con imágenes energéticas. El artista de reemplazo en el número 5 es Pascal Alixe; con una vitalidad igualmente enérgica, los lápices de Pascal son ideales para el salvajismo y la locura que ocurren dentro –y fuera– de la mente de Umbra. El coloreado de Tom McCraw también contribuye a añadir fuerza a las ilustraciones de Coipel y Alixe. Después de 8 soberbios números, Abnett, Lanning, Coipel y Alixe transformaron un título que todos despreciaban en una saga fascinante. Y seguirían impresionándonos en futuros números.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/legion-lost-5-6-7-8-abnett-lanning.html

Review: Ungrounded

Review: Ungrounded

By Rui Esteves in Blog on February 22, 2014

Add captionUngrounded came to be though a crowd funded project on Kickstarter. It is a creation of Patrick Gerard with art by Erick Webb. In it we follow the adventures of Mister Solenoid.Mister Solenoid is an old fashioned hero. A big, powerful, moral irreproachable, boy scout super-hero.He is just a regular scientist that wants to turn the world into a better place. And through the magic of science manages to wish himself some superpowers for himself. In the process changing the whole world. Not only he gets superpowers as do many others. Some become superheroes, some super-villains.Right off the bat Mister Solenoid gets a generic super-hero costume, a bunch of energy based powers and the knowledge of how to use them. He also gets the girl in the first few pages, without even breaking a sweat. The girl is a adventurous millionaire girl, imagine Lois Lane meets Lara Croft. After a bit a flying Polar Bear gets introduced. There are a few other characters, but all are one note cardboard cutouts, with little depth and interest. Meet Mister Solenoid I had little to none expectation for this book, but still managed to get frustrated while reading it. It is a disjointed group of ideas that got mixed together and resulted in an over the top retro styled confusing and boring story. Patrick Gerald had some good concepts and ideas, but the execution falls very short.Erick Webb's art is good enough. Its coherent for most of the book and as very distinct character models, but the coloring is where it falls flat. Washed out colors and different color pallets don't really mix well with the art and story telling style. The bad guys If you like retro style super-hero antics you can give it a try by checking out its official site, but keep your expectation low.Publisher: Pandemic MemeYear: 2013Pages: 58Authors: Patrick Gerard, Erick WebbISBN: 9780989575911Follow Reading Graphic Novels on Facebook and Twitter. Originally Published at Reading Graphic Novels http://readinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com/2014/02/review-ungrounded.html

Legion Lost # 1, 2, 3 4 - Abnett, Lanning Coipel

Legion Lost # 1, 2, 3 4 - Abnett, Lanning Coipel

By Arion in Blog on February 20, 2014

Olivier CoipelDeep in our hurts, rests a primitive fear, an instinctive aversion of losing our way. We can get lost in the wilderness or we can lose our mind, any sense of loss is equally frightening and potentially catastrophic. Curiously, whenever an author decides to revitalize a group of superheroes, he must remember that fear; and that feeling of being lost –the danger, the risk– must be unhindered. Legion Lost # 1, published in May 2000, begins with Shikari, an alien that is being hunted by the ruthless Progeny. Seeking shelter, she approaches a spaceship in ruins, abandoned for what seems to be centuries; and even if entering offers her only a few seconds of protection, she steps in. There, in an oxidized chamber, she discovers some memory crystals. Inside the crystals there is an encoded holographic message. The boy who left the message is no other than Jan Arrah, also known as Element Lad. He talks about a cosmic cataclysm that has sent the Legion outpost to the furthest corner of the universe. Using his powers, Element Lad has protected his friends by making them hibernate in Tromium cocoons. Shikari’s presence activates the awakening process, and soon the legionnaires are free. But where are they? And how many years have they been asleep?For as long as I can remember, the Legion of Super-Heroes has characterized itself by its naiveté and its retro / camp charm. With a very parochial view of the galaxy, everything in the old Legion tales seemed to happen in the same galactic neighborhood. Aliens, of course, are humanoids, easy to identify with (at least most of them). Earth is the capital of the United Planets, the galaxy knows only prosperity and bliss. And all extraterrestrial life-forms speak Interlac, a sort of futuristic version of English.  In “Legion Lost”, right out of the gate, Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning get rid of all of that. They embrace the fact that the universe is infinite. So now the legionnaires are thousands of galaxies away from home. The extraterrestrials they face do not speak English. There are no United Planets, no peacekeeping forces. And the Progeny is bringing misery and suffering to innumerable worlds. They have one ideology and one only: racial purity; they want homogenization, and all other life forms –all variants– must be deleted. From the get go, the legionnaires must find new ways to communicate with Shikari and the Progeny. They must strive harder than ever before. Their fight is no longer for the glory of the United Planets, their struggle is simply for survival. In "Enigma Variations", the legionnaires must steal a spaceship from the Progeny, and when they attack the cockroach-looking aliens, they uncover a nasty secret: the Progeny deletes variants by recycling their corpses and turning all that biological material into bio-building components. And here the conflict between legionnaires begins. In order to save themselves, they must steal the spaceship and run away. They have neither the time nor the resources to save the victims of the Progeny.  Olivier CoipelThis is the first time that there is dissension in their ranks. Umbra, a pragmatic warrior from Talok VIII decides it’s best to abandon the victims and concentrate on the mission at hand. They are not there to be heroes, they’re there merely to survive. Monstress, however, disagrees with Umbra. The moral stakes have never been higher. The old ways of the Legion, their rectitude, their obedience to the rules, must disappear. Monstress’ rescue attempt is a complete failure. The Progeny simply exterminate all their prisoners before letting them be liberated. The legionnaires, still faithful to their guidelines and always respectful of the sanctity of life, leave the Progeny disarmed but very much alive. But unbeknownst to the idealistic and juvenile heroes, those whose lives have been spared decide to commit suicide. After all, they have failed. And what can be the price of failure if not death? Never before in the history of the Legion had we observed such a tragic outcome. The legionnaires are unsuccessful in saving the prisoners, and also by forgiving the Progeny they condemn them to a dishonorable death. All the pleasantries are gone. The legionnaires are no longer the cheerful and playful boys and girls we were so familiar with. They have finally known misery, they have known hopeless, and they do not know how to cope with it. The Legion was a group of “individuals from places across the galaxy, bound together in a common dream”. But their dream can no longer guarantee their subsistence. The conclusion is obvious: the Legion is lost, but not just physically, as Monstress affirms “everything we value, everything we believe in… I don’t think any of it will matter in this horrid place”.Soon, the kids realize it’s crucial to find information about this unknown region of space. And in "Lone Star State", they forge an alliance with the Kwai, Shikari’s people. And they also locate a missing teammate: Drake Burroughs (Wildfire). In "Makeshift", Brainiac 5 proves why he’s the galaxy’s most respected scientist. Using spare parts and broken components, he manages to manufacture a hyper drive, a makeshift engine. And he actually succeeds (moderately). The spaceship travels 16 light years, and then they’re under the attack of energy parasites. In order to preserve the structural integrity of their space transport, they must sacrifice their last energetic components. In that moment, however, Wildfire snaps and burns all the parasites. By killing them, he’s violating the Legion codes, but they are all so far away from home, and in such desperate times, that they can’t afford the luxury of keep acting like good guys. Tensions increase. Umbra’s animosity towards Monstress causes more than one problem. Ultra Boy’s recklessness is barely controlled by the phantasmagorical presence of Apparition. Brainiac 5, the ultimate genius, the most brilliant mind in the universe, is helpless for the first time in his life, unable to generate the technology that could save him and his colleagues. Saturn Girl, as the leader of the group, has no other alternative but to make improvised decisions based on whatever little information they’ve been able to gather; and her relationship with Live Wire seems to be slowly deteriorating.  Shikari finds a holographic projection of Element Lad / Shikari encuentra un proyección holográfica de Element LadAbnett and Lanning’s narrative resourcefulness are reinforced as they shift focal points. In issue one, everything is told from the perspective of Shikari, and thus we have a fresh take on the Legion, ideal for a new reader. The second issue is told from the point of view of Monstress, who highlights the cruelty of the Progeny and identifies with the genocide victims; perhaps, she also feels as a victim herself. The third issue revolves around Kid Quantum and the frustration experimented by the young heroes. Finally, the fourth issue is focused on Apparition, and how she makes an effort to hold the team together.Abnett and Lanning’s words are precise and evocative, they eloquently convey the superhuman aspects of the legionnaires. We do not only see them in combat, we also feel how powerful they can be. With the same creative level that Alan Moore displayed when he described the powers of the members of the Justice League of America, Abnett and Lanning turn the ordinary abilities of yesteryear into the amazing powers of tomorrow. Furthermore, they balance hardcore science fiction with character development. Their immense talent as writers is made evident in the pages of this mind-blowing 12 issue miniseries.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Kid Quantum, Saturn Girl, Brainiac 5, Chameleon & MonstressEn lo más hondo de nuestros corazones, yace un miedo primitivo, una aversión instintiva a extraviarnos. Nos podemos perder en una jungla o podemos perder la cabeza, en cualquier sentido la pérdida es atemorizante y potencialmente catastrófica. Curiosamente, cada vez que un autor decide revitalizar un grupo de superhéroes, debe recordar ese miedo, y no debe haber restricciones para esa sensación de estar perdidos, para el peligro, para el riesgo. Legion Lost # 1, publicado en mayo del 2000, empieza con Shikari, una alienígena que está siendo cazada por la despiadada Progenie. Buscando refugio, se acerca a una nave espacial en ruinas, aparentemente abandonada desde hace siglos; entrar sólo le ofrece unos cuantos segundos de protección, pero aún así ella entra. Allí, en una cámara oxidada, descubre unos cristales de memoria. Dentro de los cristales hay un mensaje holográfico. El chico que ha dejado ese mensaje es nada más y nada menos que Jan Arrah, también conocido como Element Lad. Él habla sobre un cataclismo cósmico  que ha enviado al cuartel de la Legión al más alejado rincón del universo. Usando sus poderes, Element Lad ha protegido a sus amigos al hacerlos hibernar en crisálidas de Tromium. La presencia de Shikari activa el proceso que los despertará, y pronto los legionarios están de pie. Pero ¿dónde están? ¿Y cuántos años han estado dormidos?Durante décadas, la Legión de Súper-Héroes se ha caracterizado por su ingenuidad y su encanto retro / camp. Con una visión muy provinciana de la galaxia, todo en los viejos relatos de la Legión parece suceder en un mismo vecindario galáctico. Los alienígenas, desde luego, son humanoides, fáciles de identificar (al menos la mayoría). La Tierra es la capital de los Planetas Unidos, la galaxia conoce únicamente la prosperidad y la dicha. Y todas las formas de vida extraterrestre hablan Interlac, una especie de versión futurista del inglés.   Legion versus ProgenyEn “Legión perdida”, de inmediato, Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning se deshacen de todo ello. Y aceptan el hecho de que el universo es infinito. Así que ahora los legionarios están a miles de galaxias lejos de casa. Los extraterrestres a los que se enfrentan no hablan inglés. No existen los Planetas Unidos, ni hay fuerzas para mantener la paz. Y la Progenie causa miseria y sufrimiento en innumerables mundos. Tienen una sola ideología: la pureza racial; quieren la homogenización, y todas las otras formas de vida  –todas las variantes– deben ser borradas. Desde el inicio, los legionarios deben encontrar nuevas formas para comunicarse con Shikari y la Progenie. Deben esforzarse como nunca antes lo han hecho. Ya no pelearán por la gloria de los Planetas Unidos, su lucha es simplemente por sobrevivir. En "Variaciones del enigma", los legionarios deben robarle a la Progenie una nave espacial, y cuando atacan a estas cucarachas-alienígenas, destapan un terrible secreto: la Progenie borra las variantes reciclando sus cadáveres y convirtiendo todo ese material biológico en componentes de bio-construcción. Y aquí comienza el conflicto entre legionarios. Para salvarse a sí mismos, deben robar una nave espacial y huir. No tienen ni el tiempo ni los recursos para salvar a las víctimas de la Progenie. Esta es la primera vez que hay discordia entre ellos. Umbra, una pragmática guerrera de Talok VIII decide que es mejor abandonar las víctimas y concentrarse en la misión. Ellos no están allí para ser héroes, están allí solamente para sobrevivir. Monstress, sin embargo, no está de acuerdo con Umbra. El compromiso moral nunca ha sido mayor. Las viejas prácticas de la Legión, la rectitud, la obediencia a las reglas, deben desaparecer. El intento de rescate de Monstress es un completo fracaso. La Progenie simplemente extermina a todos sus prisioneros antes de permitir que sean liberados. Los legionarios, todavía fieles a sus normas y siempre respetuosos de la santidad de la vida, desarman a la Progenie pero los dejan con vida. Aunque sin que estos héroes juveniles e idealistas lo sepan, aquellos que han sido dejados con vida deciden suicidarse. Después de todo, han fracasado. ¿Y no es la muerte el precio del fracaso?Nunca antes en la historia de la Legión habíamos observado un desenlace tan trágico. Los legionarios fallan al salvar a los prisioneros, y al perdonar a la Progenie los condenan a una muerte deshonrosa. Todas las amenidades han terminado. Los legionarios ya no son los chicos y chicas alegres y juguetones que nos eran tan familiares. Finalmente han conocido la miseria, la desesperación, y no saben cómo lidiar con ello. Apparition (art by Pascal Alixe)La Legión fue un grupo de “individuos de todo la galaxia, unidos por un sueño en común”. Pero ese sueño ya no les garantiza la subsistencia. La conclusión es obvia: la Legión está perdida, pero no sólo físicamente, como afirma Monstress “todo lo que valoramos, todo en lo que creemos... pienso que nada de ello importará en este horrendo lugar”.Pronto, los muchachos se dan cuenta de que es crucial encontrar información sobre esta región desconocida del espacio. Y en "El estado de la estrella solitaria", forjan una alianza con los Kwai, el pueblo de Shikari. Y también localizan a un compañero extraviado: Drake Burroughs (Wildfire). En "Arreglo de emergencia", Brainiac 5 demuestra por qué es el científico más respetado de la galaxia. Usando materiales descartados y componentes malogrados, se las arregla para producir un híper-motor, una maquinaria de emergencia. Y de hecho tiene éxito (moderadamente). La nave espacial viaja 16 años luz, pero luego es atacada por parásitos de energía. Para preservar la integridad estructural del transporte, deciden sacrificar sus últimos componentes energéticos. En ese momento, sin embargo, Wildfire se exaspera y quema a todos los parásitos. Al matarlos, está violando el código de la Legión, pero ellos están tan lejos de casa, y en una situación tan desesperada, que no pueden darse el lujo de seguir actuando como chicos buenos.La tensión se incrementa. La animosidad de Umbra hacia Monstress causa más de un problema. La impetuosidad de Ultra Boy es apenas controlada por la presencia fantasmagórica de Apparition. Brainiac 5, el genio definitivo, la mente más brillante del universo, está indefenso por primera vez en su vida, incapaz de generar la tecnología que podría salvar a sus colegas. Saturn Girl, al liderar el grupo, no tiene otra alternativa que tomar decisiones improvisadas basadas en la poca información que han podido reunir; y su relación con Live Wire parece estar deteriorándose lentamente. Los recursos narrativos de Abnett y Lanning se refuerzan al cambiar los puntos focales. En el primer número, todo está contado desde la perspectiva de Shikari, y de este modo, podemos ver a la Legión como algo fresco, ideal para un lector nuevo. El segundo número está contado desde el punto de vista de Monstress, quien resalta la crueldad de la Progenie, ella se identifica con las víctimas del genocidio; tal vez, ella misma se considera una víctima. El tercer número gira en torno a Kid Quantum y la frustración experimentada por los jóvenes héroes. Finalmente, el cuarto número se enfoca en Apparition, y en cómo ella se esfuerza para mantener al equipo unido. Las palabras de Abnett y Lanning son precisas y evocadoras, transmiten con elocuencia los aspectos súper-humanos de los legionarios. No sólo los vemos en combate, también sentimos lo poderosos que pueden ser. Con el mismo nivel creativo que Alan Moore mostró al describir los poderes de los miembros de la Liga de la Justicia de América, Abnett y Lanning convierten las ordinarias habilidades de antaño en los asombrosos poderes del mañana. Más aún, equilibran la ciencia ficción fuerte con el desarrollo de los personajes. Su inmenso talento como escritores se hace evidente en las páginas de esta impresionante miniserie de 12 números.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/legion-lost-1-2-3-4-abnett-lanning.html

Detective Comics # 27 (2014)

Detective Comics # 27 (2014)

By Arion in Blog on February 16, 2014

In 1939, perhaps inspired by Leonardo Da Vinci’s drawings of batwings or by the detectivesque tradition of pulp heroes, writer Bill Finger and artist Bob Kane created a unique adventurer: Batman, a dark hero, a man that would reclaim his role as a creature of the night as well as the scorn of Gotham’s underworld. Greg CapulloToday, I invite you all to make a toast in honor of Finger and Kane’s immortal creation. For today, of all days, Batman celebrates his 75th anniversary. It’s hard to believe that 75 years ago, in the pages of Detective Comics # 27 (vol. I), Bruce Wayne would don the mantle of the bat, forever changing the landscape of a still incipient superhero industry. Detective Comics # 27 (vol. II), published in January 2014, is a very special edition that commemorates a character famous in all the world, a hero that is still as fascinating in our time as he was in the inaugural years of WWII. The first story is “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate”, written by the talented Brad Meltzer and illustrated by the renowned Bryan Hitch. As many of you might remember, “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate” was the first Batman story every published, and it appeared in Detective Comics # 27 (1939); and throughout the decades, many writers and artists have paid homage to it. In Detective Comics # 387 (1969), DC Comics editor Julius Schwartz asked Mike Friedrich, Bob Brown & Joe Giella to do a remake of Batman’s classic first adventure (and they included a very young Robin, still wearing his original costume; curiously, back then his main ability consisted in persuading Batman to listen to Janis Joplin records). In subsequent years, it became a bit of a tradition to retell “The Case of the Chemical Syndicate”, thanks to editor Denny O'Neil, Marv Wolfman & Jim Aparo did it, and so did Alan Grant & Norm Breyfogle in Detective Comics # 627 (1991).  Bryan HitchHaving read them all, I can affirm that Brad Meltzer’s version is the most faithful to the original. But Meltzer does something else. He delves into Batman’s mind. And he shares his motivations with us. Why does he do it? Why does he fight crime? He has a dozen of reasons, and as the story unfolds, we understand each one of those reasons. Meltzer’s voice as a writer is unmistakable, and it can be heard quite clearly even in a story that follows so closely the initial episode of 1939. He even respects the panel count (although he turns certain panels into splash pages), as he explains in the afterword, “sometimes history needs to be changed, sometimes it’s perfect as it is”. Meltzer’s respect and admiration for the Dark Knight are undeniable.“Old School”, written by Gregg Hurwitz and illustrated by the legendary Neal Adams, is a delightful meta-fictional satire, that combines the naiveté and campiness of the 60s with the innocence of golden age comic books, while at the same time winking back at us, the readers. I had no idea Hurwitz had such a great sense of humor. And Adams is the perfect artist for this tale. I especially love the last page in which we find Batman in a comic book shop, holding an issue of Detective Comics # 27. Neal AdamsPeter J. Tomasi writes a very nostalgic story in “Better Days”, beautifully illustrated by Ian Bertram. Bruce Wayne is an old man, ready to blow the 75 candles of his birthday cake. Time hasn’t treated him kindly, we can see him walking with a cane; his varicose legs, his countless scars and his white hair have not deprived him, however, of his inherent nobility. Although in a wheelchair and with an oxygen mask, Alfred is still there, ever the faithful butler. Barbara Gordon (Batgirl) and Dick Grayson (Nightwing) are approaching the age of retirement; even Tim Drake (Robin) and Damian Wayne are no longer underage sidekicks but rather old men. In this amazingly heartwarming chronicle, Bruce Wayne decides to go out one more time. To be Batman one final night while he still can... emotive and touching, this is the kind of story that you will never forget. I loved it.The authors of “The Sacrifice” are Mike W. Barr & Guillem March; Barr answers a question that most comic book readers must have asked at some point. What would have happened if Bruce Wayne’s parents didn’t get killed? How would a child’s life change if he didn’t have to witness the murder of his father and mother? The writer manages to transmit Bruce Wayne’s despair in only a few pages; at the end, his sacrifice becomes an example of heroism but that doesn’t make it any less sad. “Gothtopia” is a fascinating journey through a utopic Gotham City: a bright metropolis, a place where crime has been completely eradicated, where unemployment is a thing of the past and where everyone can enjoy the perfect life. But is it so perfect? Batman suspects it isn’t. And despise the city’s good fortune, hundreds of citizens are committing suicide. Something is happening, and Batman will have to trust in his instinct and his deductive skills to uncover the truth. John Layman’s narrative is quite impressive and the art by Jason Fabok is absolutely stunning. Fabok’s highly detailed pages, harmonic designs and precise inks are a joy to behold. With a style slightly similar to Phil Jimenez, Fabok confirms himself as one of the best artists working for the big two. Wonderful stuff. Ian Bertram“Twenty-Seven”, scripted by Scott Snyder and penciled and inked by Sean Murphy is a very imaginative take on alternative worlds and parallel dimensions. An entire dynasty of Batmen rises and falls, in different Earths, in different eras. How iconic can Batman be? Where else could he exist besides Gotham? Murphy’s artwork is so amazing, especially his remarkable double page spreads. Detective Comics # 27 also includes pinups by superstar artists such as Kelley Jones, Graham Nolan, Mike Allred, etc. This is hands down the best DC book I’ve read in years. What a fantastic way to celebrate 75 Batmanian years!________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________En 1939, tal vez inspirados por los dibujos de alas de murciélago de Leonardo Da Vinci o por la tradición detectivesca de los héroes ‘pulp’, el escritor Bill Finger y el artista Bob Kane crearon un aventurero único: Batman, un héroe oscuro, un hombre que reclamaría su rol como una criatura de la noche y como el escarnio del bajo mundo de Gotham. Guillem MarchHoy día, os invito a hacer un brindis en honor a la inmortal creación de Finger y Kane. Porque hoy, entre todos los días, Batman celebra su aniversario 75. Es difícil creer que hace 75 años, en las páginas de Detective Comics # 27 (vol. I), Bruce Wayne portaría el manto del murciélago, cambiando para siempre el escenario de una todavía incipiente industria superheroica. Detective Comics # 27 (vol. II), publicado en enero del 2014, es una edición muy especial que conmemora a un personaje famoso en el mundo entero, un héroe que sigue siendo tan fascinante en nuestra época como lo era en los años inaugurales de la Segunda Guerra Mundial.La primera historia es “El caso del sindicato químico”, escrita por el talentoso Brad Meltzer e ilustrada por el renombrado Bryan Hitch. Como muchos quizá recuerden, “El caso del sindicato químico” fue la primera historia publicada de Batman, y apareció en Detective Comics # 27 (1939); y a lo largo de las décadas, muchos escritores y artistas le han rendido homenaje. En Detective Comics # 387 (1969), el editor de DC Comics, Julius Schwartz, le pidió a Mike Friedrich, Bob Brown y Joe Giella que hicieran un remake de la clásica primera aventura de Batman (y ellos incluyeron a un Robin muy jovencito, que todavía usaba su traje original; curiosamente, en ese entonces, su principal habilidad consistía en persuadir a Batman para que escuchase discos de Janis Joplin). En años subsiguientes, se volvió una tradición recontar “El caso del sindicato químico”, gracias al editor Denny O'Neil, Marv Wolfman y Jim Aparo lo hicieron, al igual que Alan Grant y Norm Breyfogle en Detective Comics # 627 (1991).  Jason FabokComo las he leído todas, puedo afirmar que la versión de Brad Meltzer es la más fiel a la original. Pero Meltzer hace algo más. Hurga en la mente de Batman. Y comparte sus motivaciones con nosotros. ¿Por qué lo hace? ¿Por qué combate el crimen? Tiene una docena de razones, y conforme se desarrolla la historia, entendemos cada una de ellas. La voz de Meltzer como escritor es inconfundible, y puede escucharse claramente incluso en una historia que sigue tan de cerca el episodio inicial de 1939. Incluso respeta la cantidad de viñetas (aunque convierte algunas viñetas en páginas enteras), como explica en el epílogo, “a veces la historia necesita ser cambiada, a veces es perfecta tal como está”. El respeto y la admiración de Meltzer por el caballero oscuro son innegables. Sean Murphy“Vieja escuela”, escrito por Gregg Hurwitz e ilustrado por el legendario Neal Adams, es una deliciosa sátira meta-ficcional, que combina la ingenuidad y la onda 'camp' de los 60s con la inocencia de la edad dorada de los cómics, mientras que al mismo tiempo nos guiña el ojo a nosotros, los lectores. No tenía ni idea de que Hurwitz tuviese tan gran sentido del humor. Y Adams es el artista perfecto para este relato. Me encanta especialmente la última página en la que encontramos a Batman en una tienda de cómics, sujetando un ejemplar de Detective Comics # 27. Kelley JonesPeter J. Tomasi escribe una historia muy nostálgica en “Días mejores”, hermosamente ilustrada por Ian Bertram. Bruce Wayne es un anciano, y está listo para soplar las 75 velas de su pastel de cumpleaños. El tiempo no lo ha tratado amablemente, podemos verlo caminando con un bastón; sin embargo, ni sus piernas con várices, ni sus incontables cicatrices ni su pelo canoso le han arrebatado su nobleza inherente. Aunque en una silla de ruedas y con una máscara de oxígeno, Alfred aún está allí, el eterno mayordomo fiel. Barbara Gordon (Batgirl) y Dick Grayson (Nightwing) se están acercando a la edad de la jubilación; incluso Tim Drake (Robin) y Damian Wayne ya no son héroes juveniles sino más bien viejos. En esta historia asombrosamente tierna,  Bruce Wayne decide salir una vez más. Ser Batman una última noche mientras todavía puede... emotiva y conmovedora, esta es la clase de historia que nunca olvidarán. Me encantó.Los autores de “El sacrificio” son Mike W. Barr y Guillem March; Barr responde una pregunta que muchos lectores habrán formulado alguna vez. ¿Qué hubiera pasado si los padres de Bruce Wayne no hubiesen sido asesinados? ¿Cómo cambiaría la vida de un niño si no tuviese que ser testigo del homicidio de su padre y su madre? El escritor se las arregla para transmitir la desesperación de Bruce Wayne en unas cuantas páginas; al final, su sacrificio se convierte en un ejemplo de heroísmo pero eso no lo hace menos triste.“Gothtopia” es un fascinante viaje por una Gotham City utópica: una metrópolis luminosa, un lugar en el que el crimen ha sido completamente erradicado, donde el desempleo es algo del pasado y donde todos pueden disfrutar de una vida perfecta. Pero, ¿es así de perfecta? Batman sospecha que no. Y a pesar de la buena fortuna de la ciudad, cientos de ciudadanos se están suicidando. Algo sucede, y Batman tendrá que confiar en su instinto y en sus habilidades deductivas para descubrir la verdad. La narrativa de John Layman es bastante impresionante y el arte de Jason Fabok es absolutamente precioso. Las páginas sumamente detalladas de Fabok, sus diseños armónicos y tintas precisas son dignos de ser contemplados. Con un estilo ligeramente similar al de Phil Jimenez, Fabok se confirma como uno de los mejores artistas de las grandes editoriales. Maravilloso.“Veintisiete”, con argumento de Scott Snyder y lápices y tintas de Sean Murphy es un enfoque muy imaginativo sobre mundos alternativos y dimensiones paralelas. Una dinastía entera de hombres murciélago surge y cae, en diferentes Tierras, en diferentes eras. ¿Qué tan icónico puede ser Batman? ¿Dónde más podría existir además de Gotham? El arte de Murphy es tan asombroso, especialmente sus notables páginas dobles.Detective Comics # 27 también incluye pin-ups de súper-estrellas como Kelley Jones, Graham Nolan, Mike Allred, etc. Este es, de lejos, el mejor cómic de DC que he leído en años. ¡Qué manera tan fantástica de celebrar 75 años batmanianos! Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/detective-comics-27-2014.html

January comic books / cómics de enero

January comic books / cómics de enero

By Arion in Blog on February 14, 2014

This is a strange month for me. I’m sad because I read the final issue of Young Avengers, the most fantastic series I’ve been able to find in recent years. And at the same time I’m happy, thrilled actually, to (re)read the first issue of Miracleman; many have complained about the 5.99 price tag, but I must remind you all that the original Eclipse edition of issue # 1 doesn’t sell for less than 8 dollars and subsequent issues can range anywhere from 15 to 225 dollars (or more); so 5.99, (and 4.99 for the rest of the series) seems quite reasonable. Let’s keep taking about first issues. Avengers World # 1 was good (and I absolutely loved to see Star Brand in it!). All-New X-Factor wasn’t as great as I hoped it would be, and the art was a bit off-putting. Vertigo’s Dead Boy Detectives, on the other hand, was quite interesting. Nevertheless, if I had to choose the best comic of the month, that award would go to Detective Comics # 27. It’s so awesome. I promise I’ll review it. And now, without further ado, here are January comics as per solicitations. ALL NEW X-FACTOR #1 (W) Peter David (A) Carmine Di Giandomenico (CA) Jared K. Fletcher 'NOT BRAND X' Part 1 X-FACTOR IS BACK…LIKE NEVER BEFORE! Serval Industries, one of the world's most trusted names in electronics and leader in cutting-edge internet and weapons technology, has just unveiled their newest contribution to society…the All-New X-Factor. Led by mutant mistress of magnetism, Polaris, the team uses its corporate backing for the betterment of society. With her half-brother Quicksilver, notorious thief, Gambit, and more by her side, can Polaris trust that her corporate masters really have good intentions? AVENGERS WORLD #1(W) Jonathan Hickman, Nick Spencer (A) Stefano Caselli (CA) John Cassaday 'TROUBLE MAP' Earth's Mightiest Heroes have returned from the stars-- but on the world they left behind, new threats have emerged, and The Avengers will be tested like never before. In one cataclysmic day, the face of the Marvel Universe will change forever-- and the fight for Earth's future will begin. A globe-spanning epic of empires and armies, and the brave few who stand between them and us. DEAD BOY DETECTIVES #1 (MR)(W) Toby Litt, Mark Buckingham (A) Mark Buckingham, Gary Erskine (CA) Mark Buckingham From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Neil Gaiman's dead boys get their own monthly series! As fans of storybook detectives, Edwin Paine (died 1916) and Charles Rowland (died 1990) will take on any and all mysteries - including their own untimely deaths! The dead boys head back to St. Hilarions, where bullying headmasters continue to rule the school. But when they investigate the lingering mysteries of their own deaths, they meet a young girl named Crystal whose tech skills and strange link to the undead earn her a place as a new detective. DEAD BOY DETECTIVES is a fast-paced adventure series that takes us from the bustling streets of contemporary London to Japanese-inspired video games and dangerous worlds perched somewhere between the now and nevermore.  DETECTIVE COMICS #27(W) John Layman & Various (A) Jason Fabok & Various (CA) Greg Capullo. DC Entertainment presents this mega-sized issue featuring an all-star roster of Batman creators past and present!  Don't miss a modern-day retelling of The Dark Knight's origin by the incredible team of writer Brad Meltzer and artist Bryan Hitch! Plus, all-new stories by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, Peter J. Tomasi and Guillem March, Paul Dini and Dustin Nguyen, Gregg Hurwitz and Neal Adams and more! Also in this issue, John Layman and Jason Fabok kick off the new storyline 'GOTHTOPIA'! It's a bright, shiny, happy place where dreams come true...as long as you don't look at things too closely. MIRACLEMAN #1 (W) TBD, Mick Anglo (A) Various (CA) Joe Quesada • KIMOTA! With one magic word, a long-forgotten legend lives again! • Freelance reporter Michael Moran always knew he was meant for something more -- now, a strange series of events leads him to reclaim his destiny! • Relive the ground-breaking eighties adventures that captured lightning in a bottle -- or experience them for the first time -- in these digitally restored, fully relettered editions! • Issue 1 includes material originally presented in WARRIOR #1 and MIRACLEMAN #1, plus the MARVELMAN PRIMER. SCARLET #6 (MR) Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS Art and Cover by ALEX MALEEV Scarlet's call to arms has been heard all over the world. And the world reacts. Can a modern revolution gain traction? And what will the government do to shut her down? From the Eisner Award-winning team behind DAREDEVIL and MOON KNIGHT! 40 PGS./Mature THREE #4 (W) Kieron Gillen (A) Ryan Kelly, Jordie Bellaire (CA) Jordie Bellaire, Ryan Kelly. The three helot slaves desperate to escape from the repressive Spartan regime find themselves cornered on the border...but not by the pursuer they expected. Trapped and running out of options, they know the Spartan army is marching closer. They can't hide. They can't run. Are they seriously going to fight? YOUNG AVENGERS #15 (W) Kieron Gillen (A)  Various (CA) Jamie McKelvie • After the saving the world, there's the after party. And after the party, it's the hotel lobby. And around issue 15, we have to clear the lobby and then head to our rooms and do something jolly rude. • MIC-DROP! __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Este es un extraño mes para mí. Estoy triste porque leí el número final de "Young Avengers", el título más fantástico que he podido encontrar en años recientes. Y al mismo tiempo estoy feliz, entusiasmado, por (re)leer el primer número de "Miracleman"; muchos se han quejado porque el precio es 5.99, pero debo recordarles a todos que la edición original de Eclipse del # 1 no se vende por menos de 8 dólares y números subsiguientes pueden ir de 15 a 225 dólares (o mucho más); así que 5.99 (y 4.99 para el resto de la serie) parece bastante razonable. Sigamos hablando de primeros números. "Avengers World" # 1 estuvo bien (y me encantó ver a Star Brand). "All-New X-Factor" no fue tan grandioso como hubiese querido, y el arte fue bastante insatisfactorio. "Dead Boy Detectives" de Vertigo, por otro lado, fue bastante interesante. No obstante, si tuviera que elegir el mejor cómic del mes, ese premio sería para "Detective Comics" # 27. Es tan asombroso. Prometo reseñarlo. Y ahora, sin más preámbulos, aquí están los cómics de enero. ALL NEW X-FACTOR #1‘No es una marca X’. Industrias Serval acaba de revelar su mayor contribución a la sociedad… el nuevo X-Factor. Liderados por POLARIS, el equipo usará el apoyo corporativo para mejorar la sociedad. AVENGERS WORLD #1Los héroes más poderosos de la Tierra han regresado de las estrellas, pero en el mundo que dejaron atrás han surgido nuevas amenazas.DEAD BOY DETECTIVES #1 (MR)Dos adolescentes trabajarán como detectives, investigando sus propias muertes. Los chicos regresan a San Hilario, donde directores abusivos continúan dominando la escuela. Pero cuando investigan el misterio de sus muertes, conocen a una chica llamada Cristal con habilidades detectivescas y una conexión con los no muertos. El caso recién se ha abierto.DETECTIVE COMICS #27John Layman, Brad Meltzer et al.MIRACLEMAN #1Con una sola palabra olvidada, una leyenda olvidada revive.SCARLET #6 (MR)La llamada a las armas ha sido oída por todo el mundo. Y el mundo reacciona. ¿Puede persistir una revolución moderna? THREE #4Los tres esclavos, desesperados por escapar del represivo régimen espartano se encuentran acorralados… pero por un nuevo perseguidor. Atrapados y desarmados, saben que el ejército espartano se aproxima. No pueden ocultarse. No pueden huir. ¿Empezarán a luchar? You can find my signature at the bottom of the second panel / pueden encontrar mi firma al final de la segunda viñetaYOUNG AVENGERS #15Después de salvar el mundo, hay una fiesta. Y después de la fiesta, está el lobby del hotel. Y luego del lobby, nos toca ir a nuestras habitaciones y hacer algo bonitamente rudo. Y se nos cae el micrófono.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/january-comic-books-comics-de-enero.html

Agatha Ruiz de la Prada - MAC (Barranco)

Agatha Ruiz de la Prada - MAC (Barranco)

By Arion in Blog on February 13, 2014

Get Real (1998) Directed by Simon Shore  "Be realistic, demand the impossible". Why not? Sometimes being realistic means, indeed, to have no creative freedom and above all no real desire to escape ideological imprisonment.When Steven, a 16 year old student, starts frequenting public toilets hoping to hook up and have random sex with unknown men, he looks aloof and somehow emotionally unattached. His only confident is Linda, a girl somewhat ostracized because of her weight, and they come to a conclusion: no matter how hard they've tried, love has not been a part of their lives.One day, in one of those public toilets the British seem so keen on visiting, he runs into John, another student from his high school. Except that John is not just another student, he happens to be the Golden Boy, not only is he the best athlete and the most handsome boy, he is also rich and very popular. Of course, John neutralizes possible misunderstandings by explaining that he just happened to be there. When Steven, disappointed and embarrassed, decides to depart, John asks him if his parents are home.In Steven's home, the game commences, or rather, what was already there comes to the surface. When John makes fun of a teddy bear in Steven's room, that soon leads into physical contact as Steven tries to retrieve the object from John's hands. Then, after being on top of each other, breathing hard and unmistakably excited, John proceeds to unbutton Steve's trousers and when they're about to kiss things get interrupted.The interruption is a symptom of society's intervention, which in this case does not take the form of an angry mob but rather the moral constraints that are deeply rooted in John's mind. If the gaze of the other defines us completely, then what must we do to be successfully inserted in society? For traditional psychoanalysis homosexuality has been a perversion, a mental illness, a condition that could be remedied, but it has also been the abject, id est, the vilest, the very lowest of the human condition.  my drawing / mi dibujo I would like to believe that much time has passed since then, but it's undeniable that some people, perhaps more than I would care to admit, continue to think as if they had been raised in the Victorian age.On the contrary, Steven has come to terms with his sexuality since he was 11. He has no doubts, no regrets. He feels only angry at the prejudiced people surrounding him at home, at school and everywhere in between. As his relationship with John progresses, they thrive to keep the secrecy, but the clandestine rendezvous and the constant hiding takes a toll on Steven. As John explains to him, they can do anything they want as long as no one else knows about it.Although at first this is hardly a limitation, soon the nature of the relationship will demand openness. Steven wants John to feel proud of them, of their relationship, he demands John to acknowledge him in school, not only outside. How long can they go keeping the secret? And is it really impossible to declare their love to everyone else? Be realistic, sometimes the impossible simply cannot be demanded for the very reason that it shouldn't have been deemed impossible in the first place.As the impossibility of accepting homosexuality is firmly placed in John's head, things will not be easy. But when other school kids start making enquiries and deductions, the entire relationship could come apart. Does this couple have what it takes to surmount seemingly unconquerable obstacles or was this a doomed affair from the very beginning? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Marquesa Agatha Ruiz de la PradaEsta ha sido, sin duda, una noche atípica. ¿Por qué? Porque se inauguraron dos muestras imperdibles. Por un lado, Ágatha Ruiz de la Prada engalanó la sala del Museo de Arte Contemporáneo con sus vestidos ultra-contemporáneos. Como le comenté a Érika Beleván mientras me entrevistaba para Polizontes, hace falta ser una persona extraordinaria (es decir, fuera de lo ordinario) y sumamente audaz para usar la ropa que usa Agatha Ruiz de la Prada; quizá su título nobiliario le otorga automáticamente una osadía de las que pocos podrían presumir, pero lo cierto es que sus diseños de ropa son todo menos ordinarios. Y eso lo pude comprobar en la atiborrada sala del MAC, en la que cientos de individuos se fotografiaban con los atuendos de Ruiz dela Prada.No obstante, la enorme afluencia de público me hizo sentir claustrofóbico, así que luego de media hora decidí retirarme a la inauguración de “Kinésica” de Daniela Carvalho en Dédalo, allí saludé a Pedro Casusol, a María Elena Fernández, y me quedé charlando un largo rato con Mónica Cuba y con Isabelle Decenciere. Con dibujos asombrosos, Carvalho transmite una intensidad y una expresividad que pocos artistas son capaces de alcanzar. Sus vívidos retratos de rostros incompletos nos llenan de asombro, y la delicadeza de su trazo nos reconcilia con el arte en mayúsculas. Daniela CarvalhoEn el transcurso de la noche me encontré con Luis Piccini, Pablo Alayza, Eduardo y Gabriel Lores, etc. Quizás me extralimité en la cantidad de copas de espumante que bebí, pero lo cierto es que me divertí como no me divertía en meses. ¡Salud!Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/agatha-ruiz-de-la-prada-mac-barranco.html

Preview: EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT: ASSASSINS #18

Preview: EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT: ASSASSINS #18

By Rui Esteves in Blog on February 13, 2014

CoverEXECUTIVE ASSISTANT: ASSASSINS #18 Vince Hernandez ­ Writer / Jordan Gunderson ­ Art / Teo Gonzalez - ColorsAssassins reaches the end.The epic finale to Blood Origin reveals the true sacrifice required by Daffodil to forge the first Executive Assistant Academy! When the odds of success turn bleak and deadly she must decide whether her choice to painstakingly continue on with her enterprise, or risk losing everything including her life! Don't miss this pulse-pounding conclusion that is essential canon in the Executive Assistant Universe!EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT: ASSASSINS #18 is in stores February 12th, 2014! Preview Page 1 Preview Page 2 Preview Page 3 Preview Page 4 Cover B Cover CFollow Reading Graphic Novels on Facebook and Twitter. Originally Published at Reading Graphic Novels http://readinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com/2014/02/preview-executive-assistant-assassins-18.html

Young Avengers # 15 - Gillen, McKelvie more

Young Avengers # 15 - Gillen, McKelvie more

By Arion in Blog on February 10, 2014

Quite often we assume a cynical posture towards contemporary comic books. We criticize decompression, reiterative exploitation of a certain brand or group of characters, predictability, publicity stunts, lack of creative freedom as a result of editorial impositions, etc. Some might even come to believe that no good comics are produced in Marvel (and DC) due to the current atmosphere of editorial-mandated mega-events. That conclusion, however, would be utterly wrong. I have read hundreds of comics last year, from every publisher, and although I have enjoyed the proposals of independent creators working outside the big two, what I loved the most, without a doubt, was Kieron Gillen’s Young Avengers. The best of 2013 comes, indeed, from Marvel.Upon reading “Resolution part 2”, the final issue, I felt an unexpected sadness. The end awakened in me a strong melancholy, that last page, beautifully illustrated by Jamie McKelvie was like a statement about youth and friendship. It was a snapshot, a captured instant, a moment in the lives of the Young Avengers. And it was also a moment in my life. Looking at them and saying goodbye to them made me go through an experience I’m quite familiar with: the sensation of loss I have experienced every time a friend of mine decides to go to another country or another continent; most of the times I expect them to return after a couple of years, sometimes, however, they never come back. And I know then that, despite all apparent opportunities, I’ll never see them again. That is a very special kind of goodbye. They are within reach, at least theoretically, but they are no longer a part of my life.In a few years, the Young Avengers might return, but they could very well stay in limbo longer than we could possibly anticipate. So yes, it was deeply painful to read the end of this fantastic ongoing series. And now I find myself here, saying goodbye to a group of fictional characters with a heavy heart, almost as if they were real persons going away for a while. That’s the power of good literature and that’s the accomplishment of Gillen. Turning a group of superpowered kids into characters that you will always care for, characters that you can identify with, characters that will make you feel young again.But we must embrace change and move on. Marvel Boy finally understands that, now that he has ruined his relationship with Kate Bishop. Gillen gives us one final glimpse into the minds and souls of the Young Avengers. If in the previous issues we had the original members on the spotlight, now it’s time to pay attention to Marvel Boy and his silent agony. It’s also time to observe Loki not only as the god of mischief but also as a lonely teenager that feels forced to be in charge of the “dirty work”, the things that need to be done and that most of us never acknowledge appropriately. It is Loki who pays, with the treasure of Asgard, for the organization of the party, who makes sure the catering people receive a proper compensation for working through New Year’s Eve. Becky CloonanDavid Alleyne (Prodigy) still feels a bit guilty about kissing Teddy and incurring in Billy’s wrath. “You just let the party that lurks in the pants undue prominence in the parliament of prodigy”, affirms Loki. And as the two teenagers talk, David discovers that Loki isn’t 100% heterosexual “my culture doesn’t really share your concept of sexual identity. There are sexual acts, that’s it”, explains the Norse deity. Either as a joke or as a serious attempt at flirtation, Loki proposes a special celebration with David. The young mutant kindly refuses alleging Loki isn’t his type. Before disappearing into the night Loki asks David what’s his type. “Good guys”, he answers cheerfully.Later on, after David accidentally kisses Tommy, we understand how the discovery of sexuality can be life-defining in youth, and how difficult it is to find a comic in the 21st century that will discuss the matter audaciously and intelligently. Young Avengers is a title of historical significance because it’s the first superhero comic to fully embrace the diversity of sexual orientations and the only 100% GLBT American mainstream book.Jokes aside, if we take a look at the group we might consider the following attributes: Ms. America is lesbian, Prodigy is bisexual, Marvel Boy is pansexual (he will have sex with human males and females, as well as with aliens of all shapes and sizes), Hulkling is homosexual, Wiccan is homosexual, Loki is transsexual (we have seen him as a woman and using his/her feminine charms to seduce men during Straczyinki’s run on Thor), Speed is bi-curious and Kate Bishop is the only heterosexual member of the team. The Young Avengers finale was conceived as a jam special, and this time we get to see the drawings of Becky Cloonan (in charge of portraying a brooding Marvel Boy), Ming Doyle (her depiction of Loki is quite good) and Joe Quinones (who contributes with a lot of humor in Prodigy’s sequence, including the kiss with Tommy). In the letter column, many fans talk about how frustrated they feel now that the title has come to an end. I do not feel frustration, because I truly think that Gillen and McKelvie did the best comic I’ve read in years, and none of it would have been possible with editorial interference or the obsessive desire of endlessly milking the same property… a common practice in the big two. Ming DoyleGillen and McKelvie are very thankful to us, the readers. And I’m very thankful to those who made the book possible: Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, Annie Wu, Becky Cloonan, Bryan Lee O’Malley, Christian Ward, Clayton Cowles, David LaFuente, Emma Vieceli, Hannah Donovan, Idette Winecoor, Jake Thomas, Allan Heinberg, Jim Cheung, Joe Quinones, Jordie Bellaire, Kate Brown, Kris Anka, Lee Loughridge, Manny Mederos, Maris Wicks, Matthew Wilson, Mike Norton, Ming Doyle, Morry Hollowell, Nathan Fairbairn, Skottie Young, Stephanie Hans, Stephen Thompson, Tradd Moore, and editor Lauren Sankovitch and assistant editor Jon Moisan.I would also like to congratulate those who shared their secrets, fears, joys and dreams in the letter columns. I have felt really moved by those who wrote in to talk about their lives, and how they struggle against bullying, homophobia and discrimination, if some of them found inspiration on the pages of this book, then the journey has not been in vain. So a big thank you to Reed Beebe, Wally, Brad, Steven Roche, Avery, Hansel, Chuck McKinney, Matt Brooks, Graham Weaver, Amanda, Mason, Steven Butler, Patrick Bartlett, Jonathan Robbins, Mia, Saul Santos, Arcadio Bolaños (yay! that’s me! now click here to read my letter), Jack Ingram, Carlos Aguirre Reyna, Lauren, Becky Male, Izrin Iskandar, Brennan O’Reagan, Zamisk, Joe Douglas, Kami Spangler, Calvin, Trent Farrell, Lyn, Carlton Glassford, Oliver Ortiz, Michael J. Allen, Indie Gale, Clarissa Johnson, Niamh, Souxie, Regina Belmonte, Rachel Yu, Thomas Rowley, Chiara, James Hunter, Bridget Natale, Andy E, Connor Stephenson, C. Morgan Leigh, Zae, Sara Hanley, Lucy, Jacques Farnworth-Wood, Maximillian Jansen, Day Summerfield, Amanda, George Laporte, Christian Hernandez, Rachael, Niels van Eekelen, Sarah Urbank, Lawrence, Summer, Rebecca Luttig, Jack Davis, Rob Rix, Miles PDX, Mikey J. Redd, Carey & Brandon.Young Avengers has been the kind of honest, personal and tremendously creative project that will be forever remembered in comic history. And I’m very proud to say that, however briefly, I was a part of it. I was there. And I fucking loved it.Young Avengers # 11, Young Avengers # 12, Young Avengers # 13 & Young Avengers # 14Young Avengers # 1-10__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________A menudo asumimos una postura cínica en relación a los cómics contemporáneos. Criticamos la poca cohesión, explotación reiterativa de ciertas marcas o grupos de personajes, predictibilidad, trucos de publicidad, falta de libertad creativa como resultado de las imposiciones editoriales, etc. Algunos incluso podrían creer que no hay buenos cómics en Marvel (ni en DC) a causa de la actual atmósfera de mega-eventos mandados por la editorial. Esa conclusión, sin embargo, sería totalmente errónea. Joe QuinonesHe leído cientos de cómics el año pasado, y aunque he disfrutado las propuestas de creadores independientes que trabajan alejados de Marvel y DC, lo que más me encantó, sin duda alguna, fue Young Avengers de Kieron Gillen. Lo mejor del 2013 es de Marvel.Luego de leer “Resolución parte 2”, el número final, sentí una inesperada tristeza. El final despertó en mí una fuerte melancolía, esa última página, hermosamente ilustrada por Jamie McKelvie era como una declaración sobre la juventud y la amistad. Era una instantánea, un momento capturado, un segundo en las vidas de los Jóvenes Vengadores. Y también era un momento en mi vida. Mirándolos y despidiéndome de ellos, fue como experimentar algo que me resulta muy familiar: la sensación de pérdida que he sentido cada vez que un amigo decide irse a otro país o a otro continente; la mayoría de las veces, espero que regresen luego de un de par de años, a veces, sin embargo, nunca vuelven. Y entonces sé que, a pesar de todas las oportunidades, nunca más los veré de nuevo. Ese tipo de despedidas es muy especial. No han desparecido, al menos teóricamente, pero ya no son parte de mi vida.En algunos años, los Jóvenes Vengadores podrían regresar, pero bien podrían quedarse en el limbo más tiempo de lo que posiblemente podríamos anticipar. Así que fue profundamente doloroso leer el final de esta fantástica serie mensual. Y ahora estoy aquí, acongojado, casi como si se tratara de personas de verdad que estarán lejos por un tiempo. Ese es el poder de la buena literatura y ese es el logro de Gillen. Convertir a un grupo de chiquillos con poderes en personajes a los que siempre apreciarás, personajes con los que te identificas, personajes que te hacen sentir joven nuevamente. Pero debemos aceptar el cambio y seguir avanzando. Marvel Boy finalmente lo entiende, ahora que ha arruinado su relación con Kate Bishop. Gillen nos da un último vistazo a las mentes y almas de los Jóvenes Vengadores. Si en números anteriores los miembros originales estaban al centro del escenario, ahora es el momento de prestarle atención a Marvel Boy y a su agonía silenciosa. También es tiempo de observar a Loki no sólo como el dios de los enredos sino también como un adolescente solitario que se siente obligado a encargarse del “trabajo sucio”, las cosas que necesitan hacerse aunque no les demos el reconocimiento adecuado. Es Loki quien paga, con el tesoro de Asgard, la organización de la fiesta, quien se encarga de que la gente del catering reciba una compensación apropiada por trabajar en año nuevo. Joe QuinonesDavid Alleyne (Prodigy) todavía se siente un poco culpable por besar a Teddy e incurrir en la ira de Billy. “Tan sólo le permitiste a la fiesta que acecha en tus pantalones una indebida prominencia en el parlamento del prodigio”, afirma Loki. Y mientras los dos adolescentes conversan, David descubre que Loki no es 100% heterosexual “mi cultura realmente no comparte tu concepto de identidad sexual. Hay actos sexuales, eso es todo”, explica la deidad nórdica. Ya sea como una broma o un intento serio de flirtear, Loki le propone a David una celebración especial. El joven mutante amablemente rehúsa alegando que Loki no es su tipo. Antes de desaparecer en la noche, Loki le pregunta a David cuál es su tipo. “Los chicos buenos”, responde alegremente.Más tarde, después de que David besa accidentalmente a Tommy, entendemos cómo el descubrimiento de la sexualidad puede definir la vida de los jóvenes, y vemos lo difícil que es encontrar un cómic en el siglo XXI que discuta el tema inteligente y audazmente. "Young Avengers" es un título de relevancia histórica porque es el primer cómic que acepta por completo la diversidad de orientaciones sexuales y el único cómic de distribución masiva es que es 100% GLBT.Bromas aparte, si echamos un vistazo al grupo podríamos considerar los siguientes atributos: Ms. America es lesbiana, Prodigy es bisexual, Marvel Boy es pansexual (tendrá sexo con humanos, masculinos y femeninos, así como con aliens de todas las formas y tamaños), Hulkling es homosexual, Wiccan es homosexual, Loki es transexual (lo hemos visto como una mujer y usando sus encantos femeninos para seducir hombres durante la etapa de Straczyinki en Thor), Speed es bi-curioso y Kate Bishop es la única integrante heterosexual del equipo.El final de Young Avengers se concibió como algo colaborativo, y esta vez vemos los dibujos de Becky Cloonan (a cargo de retratar a un cabizbajo Marvel Boy), Ming Doyle (su retrato de Loki es bastante bueno) y Joe Quinones (quien contribuye con humor en la secuencia de Prodigy, incluyendo el beso con Tommy).  Last page, final issue / última página, número finalEn la sección de cartas, muchos fans comentaron lo frustrados que se sentían ahora que el título llegaba a su fin. Yo no siento frustración, porque realmente pienso que Gillen y McKelvie hicieron el mejor cómic que he leído en años, y nada de esto hubiese sido posible con interferencias editoriales o el deseo obsesivo de ordeñar eternamente un mismo producto... una práctica común en Marvel y DC.Gillen y McKelvie nos agradecen a nosotros, los lectores. Y yo le doy las gracias a aquellos que hicieron posible esta colección: Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, Annie Wu, Becky Cloonan, Bryan Lee O’Malley, Christian Ward, Clayton Cowles, David LaFuente, Emma Vieceli, Hannah Donovan, Idette Winecoor, Jake Thomas, Allan Heinberg, Jim Cheung, Joe Quinones, Jordie Bellaire, Kate Brown, Kris Anka, Lee Loughridge, Manny Mederos, Maris Wicks, Matthew Wilson, Mike Norton, Ming Doyle, Morry Hollowell, Nathan Fairbairn, Skottie Young, Stephanie Hans, Stephen Thompson, Tradd Moore, y la editora Lauren Sankovitch y el editor asistente Jon Moisan.También quisiera felicitar a aquellos que compartieron sus secretos, sus miedos, sus alegrías y sus sueños en la sección de cartas. Realmente me he sentido conmovido por aquellos que escribieron para hablar de sus vidas, y su lucha contra los abusos, la homofobia y la discriminación, si alguno de ellos encontró inspiración en las páginas del cómic, entonces el viaje no fue en vano. Así que muchas gracias a Reed Beebe, Wally, Brad, Steven Roche, Avery, Hansel, Chuck McKinney, Matt Brooks, Graham Weaver, Amanda, Mason, Steven Butler, Patrick Bartlett, Jonathan Robbins, Mia, Saul Santos, Arcadio Bolaños (¡sí, ese soy yo! hagan click aquí para leer mi carta), Jack Ingram, Carlos Aguirre Reyna, Lauren, Becky Male, Izrin Iskandar, Brennan O’Reagan, Zamisk, Joe Douglas, Kami Spangler, Calvin, Trent Farrell, Lyn, Carlton Glassford, Oliver Ortiz, Michael J. Allen, Indie Gale, Clarissa Johnson, Niamh, Souxie, Regina Belmonte, Rachel Yu, Thomas Rowley, Chiara, James Hunter, Bridget Natale, Andy E, Connor Stephenson, C. Morgan Leigh, Zae, Sara Hanley, Lucy, Jacques Farnworth-Wood, Maximillian Jansen, Day Summerfield, Amanda, George Laporte, Christian Hernandez, Rachael, Niels van Eekelen, Sarah Urbank, Lawrence, Summer, Rebecca Luttig, Jack Davis, Rob Rix, Miles PDX, Mikey J. Redd, Carey y Brandon."Young Avengers" ha sido el tipo de proyecto honesto, personal y tremendamente creativo que será recordado para siempre en la historia de los cómics. Y estoy muy orgulloso de decir que, aunque brevemente, yo también fui parte de ello. Yo estuve allí. Y eso es jodidamente genial.Young Avengers # 11, Young Avengers # 12, Young Avengers # 13 & Young Avengers # 14Young Avengers # 1-10Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/young-avengers-15-gillen-mckelvie-more.html

Angel: Revelations - Aguirre-Sacasa Pollina

Angel: Revelations - Aguirre-Sacasa Pollina

By Arion in Blog on February 7, 2014

“He's smart, tall, handsome, and rich; a star both on the field and in the classroom. All the girls want to date him, all the guys want to be him”, his name is Warren Worthington III, heir of one of New York’s largest –and oldest– fortunes. Yes, Warren has the perfect life, until one day he realizes his body is changing, and it’s not simple hair growing in unexpected places or his voice sounding different, it’s something far more mystifying.Talented writer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa examines the youthful days of Warren, a year before he became one of Charles Xavier’s first pupils, months before turning into Angel, founding member of the X-Men. He’s still in high school, in his senior year, “his hair is blonde… he’s 17… he doesn’t’ live with his family, but at his school… where the hills are green… he’s handsome… rich […] he’s worthy”.Warren Worthington III is a sports idol in St. Joseph’s preparatory, and he has even broken a few state records thanks to his agility and velocity. But no matter how much he eats, he’s been losing weight lately, and strange bruises have appeared on his shoulders. Something is growing inside of him, something that does not belong to human physiology. He acknowledges this, and thus stops hanging out with his friends, refusing to participate in sports or games; and he hides from everyone, even his girlfriend. “Whatever’s happening to me, to my body… I have to keep it hidden… I have to keep it a secret”. Warren feels ashamed of himself, disgusted even. But above all, he feels lonely and he wishes he could just go home and deal with this situation privately. He’s been raised by a very traditional family, and one of the rules that comes with old money is to avoid scandals, always. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa intensifies the feeling of loneliness and abandonment, while preserving the normal insecurities of a teenager. The boarding school makes Warren feel claustrophobic, and we can easily imagine his suffering. We’ve seen Angel as a proud mutant with white wings, soaring the skies like a harbinger of the gods. But this story takes place long before that, and the writer genuinely captures that in-between instance, that moment of excision, that particular day when Warren stops being the golden boy everyone loves and starts fearing the monster he could turn into.Nevertheless, the protagonist will eventually be more concerned with moral monstrosity, for example, the heinous crimes of a religious zealot that hunts down mutants. Aguirre-Sacasa combines two different threats, one that comes from the exterior –the mutant exterminator– and another one that lies in the very heart of St. Joseph’s preparatory: father Reynolds, a pedophile that has been raping young boys for over 20 years, and that has now chosen Andrew Palmer –a shy gay kid and Warren’s best friend– as his victim. The two teenagers have, indeed, dark secrets. As feathers start protruding out of Warren’s back, he isolates even more; and as father Reynolds starts abusing of Andrew more and more often, the frightened youngster also feels the need to seclude himself. It is at this weird juncture –two teens trying to conceal physical evidences of something abnormal, trying to pretend that if they close their eyes, the bad things will go away– that Warren and Andrew support each other, until eventually they confess their secrets. Andrew has a crush on Warren, although the proximity, the intimacy they share, leads not to romance but to a very special complicity.Nonetheless, confession doesn’t mean salvation. And as the days go by, the senior students decide it’s time for some hazing, and their target is Andrew Palmer. The older boys capture the fragile kid and proceed to undress him; they plan on physically punishing him as part of the hazing that all seniors must perform on the younger students. It’s interesting to observe, as Slavoj Žižek would describe it, that this isn’t merely an eroticization of the “disciplinary” procedure that older boys feel entitled to, but the constitutive obscene supplement of the activity. In the same way that father Reynolds displays the contours of a particular fantasy –an older male who engages in sexual activities with another, younger male, preferably a child– which bears witness to his own perverted sexual desire, the senior alumni unwittingly bring to light the obscene libidinal foundation of their own crusade against “fags”. In fact, as they accuse Andrew of being Warren’s boyfriend, they lay bare the underlying libidinal economy –the libidinal profit, the ‘plus-de jouir’– which sustains their homophobic behavior.Warren is the only senior student that refuses to participate in the hazing. That decision alone reveals his ethics and his courage. He’s already a hero, long before saving the world or fighting against Magneto, and his heroism starts with criticizing the actions of his peers. But Warren goes even further, he rescues his friend Andrew, even if that means getting into a fight with his former teammates.“Angel: Revelations” is an impressive miniseries that explores mature themes intelligently and sensibly. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa takes advantage of the Marvel Knights imprint to include scenes that would not be accepted in a regular Marvel comic. And artist Adam Pollina also takes this opportunity to draw as freely as he wants. His highly stylized pages are unique; his figures –depurated of anatomical weight– possess an undeniable elfish grace. Indeed, thanks to Pollina’s style, Warren is portrayed as a true creature of the skies, blossoming with subtle sexuality and pure youthfulness. Adam Pollina and colorist Matt Hollingsworth throw in different sensibilities into the mix, and the final result seems influenced by artistic movements like Fauvism and Impressionism. Pollina’s non-naturalistic representations of the human anatomy add depth to a story that emphasizes on the inhuman elements of Warren’s body. “Senior Year” is, without a doubt, one of the finest tales we can possibly find about the earlier days of an X-Man. The glory days of a star athlete / los días de gloria de un atleta estrella__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Warren's body is changing / el cuerpo de Warren está cambiando “Él es listo, alto, guapo, y rico; una estrella tanto de los deportes y los estudios. Todas las chicas quieren salir con él, todos los chicos quieren ser él”, su nombre es Warren Worthington III, heredero de una las más grandes –y añejas– fortunas de New York. Sí, Warren tiene la vida perfecta, hasta que un día se da cuenta de que su cuerpo está cambiando, y no son vellos que salen en algún lugar inesperado o los cambios de la voz, es algo mucho más misterioso.El talentoso escritor Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa examina los días juveniles de Warren, un año antes de convertirse en uno de los primeros pupilos de Charles Xavier, meses antes de ser Angel, miembro fundador de los X-Men. Todavía está en secundaria, en su último año, “su pelo es rubio… tiene 17 años… no vive con su familia, sino en su colegio… donde las colinas son verdes… es guapo… rico […] es valioso”.Warren Worthington III es un ídolo deportivo en la preparatoria St. Joseph, e incluso ha roto algunos records estatales gracias a su agilidad y velocidad. Pero no importa cuánto coma, ha estado perdiendo peso últimamente, y unas extrañas laceraciones han aparecido en sus hombros. Algo en su interior está creciendo, algo que no pertenece a la fisiología humana. Él reconoce esto, y por ello deja de ver a sus amigos, y se rehúsa a participar en juegos y deportes; y se esconde de todos, incluso de su enamorada. “Lo que sea que me esté pasando a mí, a mi cuerpo... tengo que mantenerlo escondido... tengo que mantenerlo en secreto”. Warren se avergüenza de sí mismo, incluso siente asco. Pero por encima de todo, se siente solo, y desearía poder ir a casa y lidiar con esta situación en privado. Ha sido criado por una familia muy tradicional, y una de las reglas de los ricos de antaño es evitar siempre los escándalos. As a teenager all he can think about is... sex / como adolescente, él sólo piensa en... sexo the break-up / la rupturaRoberto Aguirre-Sacasa intensifica la sensación de soledad y abandono, mientras preserva las inseguridades normales de un adolescente. El internado hace que Warren se sienta claustrofóbico, y podemos imaginar su sufrimiento. Hemos visto a Angel como un orgulloso mutante de alas blancas, surcando los cielos como un emisario de los dioses. Pero esta es la historia que ocurrió antes, y el escritor captura genuinamente esa instancia entre dos mundos, ese momento de escisión, ese día particular en el que Warren deja de ser el chico de oro que todos adoran y empieza a temer al monstruo en el que podría convertirse.No obstante, el protagonista eventualmente estará más preocupado por la monstruosidad moral, por ejemplo, los horrendos crímenes de un fanático religioso que caza mutantes. Aguirre-Sacasa combina dos amenazas diferentes, una que viene del exterior –el exterminador de mutantes– y otra que yace en el corazón mismo de la preparatoria St. Joseph: el padre Reynolds, un pedófilo que ha estado violando niños por más de 20 años, y que ahora ha elegido a Andrew Palmer –un tímido chiquillo gay y el mejor amigo de Warren– como su víctima.Los dos adolescentes tienen, de hecho, secretos oscuros. Cuando las plumas empiezan a salir de la espalda de Warren, él se aísla aún más; y cuando el padre Reynolds empieza a abusar de Andrew cada vez más a menudo, el asustado jovencito también siente la necesidad de recluirse. En esta rara coyuntura –dos adolescentes intentando ocultar las evidencias físicas de algo anormal, intentando fingir que si cierran los ojos, las cosas malas desaparecerán– que Warren y Andrew se apoyan entre sí, hasta que eventualmente confiesan sus secretos. Andrew se siente atraído por Warren, aunque la cercanía, la intimidad que comparten, no es el origen de ningún romance sino de una complicidad muy especial. Warren reveals his secrets to Andrew / Warren le revela sus secretos a AndrewNo obstante, la confesión no significa la salvación. Y conforma pasan los días, los estudiantes de último año deciden que es hora de la 'iniciación', y su objetivo es Andrew Palmer. Los muchachos capturan al frágil chiquillo y proceden a desvestirlo; planean castigarlo físicamente como parte de la iniciación que todos los de último año llevan a cabo con los alumnos más jóvenes. Es interesante observar, tal como lo describiría Slavoj Žižek, que esto no es meramente la erotización del procedimiento “disciplinario” que los chicos se adjudican, sino el suplemento obsceno constitutivo de la actividad.  AngelDel mismo modo que el padre Reynolds exhibe los contornos de una fantasía particular  –un hombre mayor que mantiene actividades sexuales con otro menor, de preferencia un niño– que atestigua su propio deseo sexual perverso, los alumnos de último año involuntariamente sacan a la luz la raíz libidinal obscena de su propia cruzada contra los “maricas”. De hecho, cuando acusan a Andrew de ser el enamorado de Warren, desnudan la economía libidinal subyacente –la ganancia libidinal, el ‘plus de goce’– que brinda sostén a su comportamiento homofóbico.Warren es el único estudiante de último año que se rehúsa a participar en la iniciación. Esa decisión revela su ética y su coraje. Él ya es un héroe, mucho antes de salvar el mundo o pelear contra Magneto, y su heroísmo empieza al criticar las acciones de sus colegas. Pero Warren va más allá, rescata a su amigo Andrew, incluso si eso significa pelearse con sus ex compañeros de equipo.“Angel: Revelations” es una impresionante miniserie que explora temas maduros con inteligencia y sensibilidad. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa aprovecha el sello de Marvel Knights para incluir escenas que no serían aceptadas en un cómic Marvel típico. Y el artista Adam Pollina también aprovecha esta oportunidad para dibujar tan libremente como le apetece. Sus páginas sumamente estilizadas son únicas; sus figuras –depuradas de peso anatómico– poseen una innegable gracia élfica. De hecho, gracias al estilo de Pollina, Warren es retratado como una verdadera criatura de los cielos, que florece con una sexualidad sutil y pureza juvenil. Adam Pollina y el colorista Matt Hollingsworth aportan diferentes sensibilidades, y el resultado final parece estar influenciado por movimientos artísticos como el fauvismo y el impresionismo. Las representaciones no-naturalistas de Pollina de la anatomía humana añaden profundidad a una historia que enfatiza los elementos inhumanos del cuerpo de Warren. “Último año” es, sin duda, uno de los mejores relatos que podemos encontrar sobre el pasado de los X-Men.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/02/angel-revelations-aguirre-sacasa-pollina.html

Review: Astronauta Magnetar

Review: Astronauta Magnetar

By Rui Esteves in Blog on February 6, 2014

Cover The Astronaut (O Astronauta) is a brazilian comic book character created in 1963 by Mauricio de Sousa. This BRASA (brazilian Nasa) astronaut has been around for generations, enchanting kids and grown ups everywhere.Between 2009 and 2011 there was a project to recreate the Astronaut in a modern light. Those were shorter stories and were printed in an anthology style book. In 2012 Danilo Beyruth created this 70 pages story that reinvents The Astronaut.If you're not familiar with the character, The Astronaut is all about the simple things in life. Its about the perspective of things. Always going far way just to find value in the simpler aspects of daily life.Magnetar takes place in deep space around a magnetar (neutron star) where The Astronauts gets marooned. The story develops around his journey back home, both literally and figuratively. Contemplating the Magnetar This is a beautiful story. Sweet and heartwarming, with the right amount of humor and a dash of action. Its simple, yet with enough complexity that you'll read it at least twice.The art is just gorgeous. Slick pencils and on the spot coloring permeate these 70 pages with eye candy that translates the tone and feel of the story perfectly. The claustrophobic felling of despair of the marooned Astronaut is beautifully portrayed, as is  the vastness of space (on the few panels that show it). The beginning of the end The only drawback of the book it how hard it is to get a hold of a copy. It wasn't advertised at all and as such few stores even knew of it existence. Luckily my local newspaper stand managed to procure a copy for me.Publisher: Panini ComicsYear: 2013Pages: 82Authors: Danilo BeyruthISBN: 9788565484428Follow Reading Graphic Novels on Facebook and Twitter. Originally Published at Reading Graphic Novels http://readinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com/2014/02/review-astronauta-magnetar.html

The Outhouse is not responsible for any butthurt incurred by reading this website. All original content copyright the author. Banner by Ali Jaffery - he's available for commission!