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    Miracleman # 8 - Alan Moore Chuck Austen

    As a veteran horror fan, I’ve seen plenty of persecutions, hundreds of movies about people being chased by something awful, monstrous, supernatural and terribly lethal. And I’ve gotten used to it to the point that now I find those scenes barely surprising. 

    In “Bodies”, however, the suspense is very intense (“Bodies” was originally published in Eclipse’s Miracleman # 7, in April 1986). Michael Moran is being hunted by an extraterrestrial hound. Evelyn Cream has already been devoured. And he’s next. Unless he can find a way to escape from the monster. Moran’s first instinct is to use the gun Cream gave to him to shoot at the scaly creature. But he’s too slow, too clumsy, too human. The monster simply eats part of his hand and the revolver.

    As we’ve seen in earlier chapters, the contrast between Miracleman and Moran was more than evident. The Superman was superior to the man in every conceivable way. That is why Moran has no trust in his own abilities, and yet his survival instinct remains intact. Thanks to a clever ruse, Moran is able to use the key word “Steppenwolf” to revert the creature to his original state: a defenseless, normal dog.    

    “The Wish I Wish Tonight” is an extraordinary example of Alan Moore’s brilliant exploration of characters. Miracleman is back, a superhuman amongst ordinary people, a wolf surrounded by sheep. Moore gets inside the head of Gargunza’s ruthless killers, and inside the head of one of them in particular. A former Nazi soldier remembers Hitler’s dream of the Übermensch, the superior race: “He was a vision… That blond hair. Those blue eyes […] We waited for him to come for forty years… and then we killed him”.
    Miracleman # 8 - Alan Moore Chuck Austen
    Michael Moran versus Miracledog 

    For the Nazi mercenary, Miracleman was the superior man Hitler had promised to his SS troops. And he feels remorse for helping Gargunza in his homicidal plans. “Forty years we have waited for you. For the first of the blond gods that would replace us. Overman. You have come at last”, says the mercenary, almost as if pleading for his life. Miracleman’s reaction is terribly inhuman: he has already crushed the skulls of the other two henchmen, and now he simply breaks the Nazi’s chest with his finger, killing him immediately.

    There is something almost demential in Miracleman’s apparent cruelty, but at the same time it’s reassuring to observe how a superhuman uses his superpowers without any limits or moral constraints. He kills everyone and everything in his path until reaching Gargunza. The hunted victim of the first pages is now the merciless hunter.

    “Can you see the planet, how big it is? Can you see the scale I live on? Gargunza, can you see how small you have always been?”, asks Miracleman. And in an unexpected and very shocking scene, Miracleman decides to put an end to the life of his creator. Moore combines a moment of tenderness (the “kiss of death” that Miracleman gives to the scientist) with a brutal sequence that shows how Gargunza’s body is incinerated upon entry in our planet’s atmosphere.
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    Miracleman # 8 - Alan Moore Chuck Austen
    Miracleman kills Gargunza's men /
    Miracleman mata a los hombres de Gargunza

    Como fanático veterano del terror, he visto muchas persecuciones, cientos de películas sobre gente que es cazada por algo horrendo, monstruoso, sobrenatural y terriblemente letal. Y me he acostumbrado a ello al punto que ahora esas escenas apenas me sorprenden. 

    En “Cuerpos”, sin embargo, el suspenso es muy intenso (“Cuerpos” se publicó originalmente en Miracleman # 7 de Eclipse, en abril de 1986). Michael Moran está a punto de ser cazado por un sabueso extraterrestre. Evelyn Cream ya ha sido devorado. Y él es el siguiente. A menos que pueda hallar el modo de escapar del monstruo. El primer instinto de Moran es usar el arma que Cream le dio para disparar a la criatura escamosa. Pero él es demasiado lento, demasiado torpe, demasiado humano. El monstruo simplemente se come parte de su mano y el revólver.

    Como hemos visto en capítulos anteriores, el contraste entre Miracleman y Moran era más que evidente. El superhombre era superior al hombre en cada aspecto imaginable. Es por ello que Moran no tiene confianza en sus propias habilidades, y no obstante su instinto de supervivencia permanece intacto. Gracias a una astuta treta, Moran es capaz de usar la palabra clave “Steppenwolf” para revertir a la criatura a su estado original: un perro normal e indefenso.

    “El deseo que yo deseo esta noche” es un extraordinario ejemplo de la brillante exploración de personajes de Alan Moore. Miracleman ha regresado, un súper-humano entre gente ordinaria, un lobo rodeado de ovejas. Moore se mete en la cabeza de los despiadados asesinos de Gargunza, y al interior de la cabeza de uno de ellos en particular. Un ex-soldado nazi que recuerda el sueño de Hitler del Übermensch, la raza superior: “Él era una visión... Ese pelo rubio. Esos ojos azules […] Esperamos su llegada por cuarenta años… y luego lo matamos”.
    Miracleman # 8 - Alan Moore Chuck Austen
    the kiss of death / el beso de la muerte

    Para el mercenario nazi, Miracleman era el hombre superior que Hitler había prometido a sus tropas de la SS. Y siente remordimiento al ayudar a Gargunza en sus planes homicidas. “Cuarenta años hemos esperado por ti. Por el primero de los dioses rubios que nos reemplazarían. Sobre-Hombre. Has venido por fin”, dice el mercenario, casi como si rogara por su vida. La reacción de Miracleman es terriblemente inhumana: ya ha destrozado el cráneo de los otros dos matones, y ahora simplemente rompe el pecho del nazi con un dedo, matándolo de inmediato.

    Hay algo casi demencial en la aparente crueldad de Miracleman, pero al mismo tiempo es convincente observar cómo un súper-humano usa sus superpoderes sin límites ni restricciones morales. Mata a todos y a todo en su camino hasta llegar a Gargunza. La víctima cazada de las primeras páginas es ahora el cazador sin piedad.

    “¿Puedes ver el planeta?, ¿lo grande que es? ¿Puedes ver la escala en la que vivo? Gargunza, ¿puedes ver lo pequeño siempre has sido?”, pregunta Miracleman. Y en una inesperada e impactante escena, Miracleman decide darle fin a la vida de su creador. Moore combina un momento de ternura (el “beso de la muerte” que Miracleman le da al científico) con una brutal secuencia que muestra el cuerpo de Gargunza que se incinera al entrar en la atmósfera de nuestro planeta.

    Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/miracleman-8-alan-moore-chuck-austen.html

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    About the Author - Arion


    Arion, who is either from Chile or New York (it’s not really clear) writes a blog that the Outhouse steals on a regular basis.  Arion is by far the nicest of all the staff writers and the most well behaved only having been banned from one country.  One thing we really appreciate about Aroin is that he writes his reviews in English and Spanish and we hope someday he’ll translate this blurb for us.  We’re not so good at languages, just look at how well we write in English if you need proof.  You should bookmark Arion’s blog -  http://artbyarion.blogspot.com – and actually look at it.  There will be a quiz at the end of every month.

     


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