Saturday, November 18, 2017 • Evening Edition • "Better than Bleeding Cool by that much."

TMNT #64: The Fridge Problem

Written by Tyler Kes on Monday, December 05 2016 and posted in Reviews

TMNT #64: The Fridge Problem

A strong issue marred by an unfortunately common problem.


Source: IDW Publishing

Written by Kevin Eastman and Tom Waltz
Drawn by Dave Waltz
Letters by Rhonda Pattison
Colors by Shawn Lee

Well this issue certainly makes some things pretty clear. One of the things that has bothered me the most over the last 14 issues or so is the way the turtles themselves have been pushed out of the focus of the series, as it shifted more to the doings of the Foot Clan. It made sense from a story perspective; I think I would have been equally disappointed if Eastman and Waltz had decided to not follow up on Splinter's momentous decision at the end of issue #50.

However, it looks like for the foreseeable future, the turtles will once again rule the spotlight, following Splinter's reveal that he has been trying to drive his sons away for some time now, in order to protect them from the dangers that being in the Foot Clan would expose them to. It is a smart reveal for several reasons; for one, it allows Leonardo to take the next step in his character arc and become the actual leader of the group, instead of remaining just the field commander. It is a similar move to the one Cyclops made when he took over the running the X-Men at the end of Morrison's New X-Men run, and hopefully it will provide just as many interesting stories. Additionally, the fact that Splinter is still running the Foot Clan is just another way that he and Shredder are similar, and I would not be surprised if the Turtles are required to come into conflict with their former master sometime down the road.

That does not mean the whole issue was a success, mind you. The whole romantic subplot of Harold and his former lab partner/ex did not work for me at all, probably because she is barely a character beyond her role in her relation to Harold. Libby is only there to die, and cause Harold to move along further on his path. It's a textbook case of fridging, and this book is better than that.

On the art side of things, Dave Watcher's gritty, scratchy art is perfect for this issue, which is mostly set during a nighttime street brawl/attack on the Street Phantom's rescue. Although I generally prefer the artistic stylings of previous TMNT artists, such as Mateus Santolouco and Sophie Campbell, Watcher is better than most of the other artists that were on the book, so I cannot complain too much.

Overall, I enjoyed certain parts of this issue, but the unfortunate fridging (even if I didn't like the character in the first place) outweigh the good.





Loading...

Help spread the word, loyal readers! Share this story on social media:



Comment without an Outhouse Account using Facebook

We get it. You don't feel like signing up for an Outhouse account, even though it's FREE and EASY! That's okay. You can comment with your Facebook account below and we'll take care of adding it to the stream above. But you really should consider getting a full Outhouse account, which will allow you to quote posts, choose an avatar and sig, and comment on our forums too. If that sounds good to you, sign up for an Outhouse account by clicking here.

Note: while you are welcome to speak your mind freely on any topic, we do ask that you keep discussion civil between each other. Nasty personal attacks against other commenters is strongly discouraged. Thanks!
Help spread the word, loyal readers! Share this story on social media:

About the Author - Tyler Kes


Tyler Kes is from Minnesota, although he spent some time living in West Virginia, where he graduated from Marshall University in 2013. He spent some time honing his writing skills by working at a newspaper and then at a TV station, but now makes his living making tacos and writing about comics.
More articles from Tyler Kes
The Outhouse is not responsible for any butthurt incurred by reading this website. All original content copyright the author. Banner by Ali Jaffery - he's available for commission!