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52apolooza: Static Shock - Marvel Reviewer: Daniel Buckley



Marvel Reviewer: Daniel Buckley

Static Shock follows our story's main hero, Virgil Hawkins, aka Static. Reading more as a continuation of an otherwise unknown or unspecified event in the story, our tale begins with Virgil narrating to himself as he is in pursuit of Sunspot, a villain with powers and abilities comparable to that of our hero. Describing his tactics with conversation better suited for a college physics lecture, Static overpowers his adversary. The battle garners begrudged complaints of the citizens of New York, as well as the attention of a crime syndicate referred to only as the Slate Gang.

StaticShock1image4Static definitely reads and feels like Spider-Man; a teenaged youth trying to balance the complications of family life as well as the dreary necessities of high school while still operating incognito as the superhero of the city, and he is even a genius in physics to boot. He isn't Superman, Batman or The Flash and there is aura that he knows this but will do what he can to fight for the respect he feels he deserves. As for the this particular issue, the comic feels more as though Static's inner monologue is more of an unnecessary exposition instead of a natural narrative.

Despite the comic being nearly entirely dedicated to its opening battle, I still felt as though the book was sluggish; dragged down by too much narrative and conversation. It's understandable that it isn't meant to be solely landscape-altering battles and wanton destruction, but when you are in the midst of a life-threatening battle the reader shouldn't be forced to check Google or Wikipedia to understand just what the hero is doing with his powers to overcome his adversary.

StaticShock1image5The story was still very well done, wordiness of the dialogue aside. I was immediately drawn in to the drama of the situation and the excitement of the battle without an overly complex exposition or a dumbed-down battle sequence that feels more of a Saturday morning cartoon than a comic aimed a wide array of readers. The cover art was dynamic with accurate proportions and a vivid color scheme, the beginning of the book thrust the reader into the events of the character, the middle's exposition was brief and felt completely natural, and the ending left me anxiously anticipating the next issue. This story will be enjoyed by hardened veterans, true believers and newcomers alike.

Writing: 17/25
Art: 21/25
Accessibility: 22/25
Enjoyability: 21/25

Overall: 91/100
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About the Author - Christian Hoffer


Christian Hoffer is the exasperated Abbott to the Outhouse's Costello. When he's not yelling at the Newsroom for upsetting readers or complaining to his wife about why the Internet is stupid, he sits in his dingy business office trying to find new ways to make the site earn money. Hoffer is also the only person in history stupid enough to moderate two comic book forums at once.

 


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