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Green Lantern Corps Quarterly - "Dreaming"

1catsratchlogo.jpgCat-Scratch visits an Alan Scott story appearing in Green Lantern Corps Quarterly issue #5 this time about.




glq_05.gifGreen Lantern Corps Quarterly issue #5

Published by DC Comics in 1993

Story Written by Ron Marz
Penciled by Jim Balent
Inked by Andrew Pepoy



The Story :


Alan Scott is asleep in a hotel room during a business trip. He dreams of the past and his wife, Molly Maine aka The Harlequin. Alan walks and stumbles to the bathroom. He sees himself in the mirror and is surprised. He sees himself young again, a face he hasn't seen in decades. His ring ignites and he finds more has changed then just his physical age, his costume has also changed into a modern version. He sets out to find out what's going on when he's attacked by a dead man, The Icicle! It seems to be the same villain that Alan had fought decades ago. They struggle with Alan being victorious, The Icicle's gun exploding and causing the villain to be encased in ice.
But as Alan approaches, he sees that there is only a skull faced corpse in the ice. It erupts,
out comes Solomon Grundy! Grundy attacks while screaming that "The Lantern must die!" over and over.
Alan blasts the giant with his ring. Down goes Grundy, burning down into a pile of ash. Alan ponders whom is behind this all, when he's answered. A silver haired woman in a tight and revealing purple costume claims to be responsible. She further claims to be Harlequin. She claims she did it for him, to make him happy and to be with her. She disappears through a phantasm of illusion as he claims not to wish for this. Alan Scott is left on a roof top, wondering who this Harlequin is and why she did what she did. Was it all just an illusion?


The Review :

This was the first story where Alan Scott was revamped into a younger version of himself and it was also one of the first times Kim Balent got to redesign a DC Character. I rather liked it.
I find it notable as here, it almost seemed at the time, that maybe Alan Scott was being set up
to be THE Green Lantern at DC Comics. But, instead that would be a young fellow name Kyle instead.

The story was a simple tease one, nothing particular heavy nor that intriguing unless you were
already an Alan Scott fan. It possessed all the hallmarks of a set up for something new being
done with Alan Scott and perhaps a new version of his long time nemesis. It just scratches the
surface and touches on then recent stories concerning Solomon Grundy and The Icicle. Still, not bad for what could be called fluff.

The art was nice and fairly clean. Typical of Balent's work of the time and considering he was
just starting out. Pepoy's inks at times made me think of Vince Colletta, but then, Jim Balent's artwork may well have been light at the time with soft line weight. Not bad to look at if you enjoy Jim Balent's present work in his self published comic Tarot - Witch of the Black Rose.

I choose this story for review as I've always been a fan of Alan Scott and thought it could be an interesting little thing to look over again considering today's status of all the Green Lanterns.
It really did seem as though they may have been setting up for a return to the original or just
giving a big clean up and appeal to the newer readers out there at the time. Sadly, it wouldn't last.
Not to spoil things, but it's eventually used to in several stories to come years later concerning demonic deals and ancient magical beings. A rather quiet start to a rather quiet over all story concerning Alan Scott and his wife, Molly. But it does almost show that things may have gone differently back then and just imagine it. After Hal Jordan fell, Alan Scott could have returned to starring as The Green Lantern of DC Comics in the 90s. So in the end, it's a minor yet fun reminder of what could have been.

For more info on Alan Scott - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Scott
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