Thursday, February 26, 2015 • Evening Edition • "That smell was here before we went in."
Nightfly's Music Video Week in Review 11/27/11 - Lady Gaga, Britney Spears, and more!

Nightfly's Music Video Week in Review 11/27/11 - Lady Gaga, Britney Spears, and more!

By Nightfly in Features on December 5, 2011

Nightfly lists his preferred picks among last week's newly released music videos.

Nightfly's TV Week in Review 11/27/11 - Supernatural, Bored to Death, and more!

Nightfly's TV Week in Review 11/27/11 - Supernatural, Bored to Death, and more!

By Nightfly in Features on December 5, 2011

Nightfly lists his preferred picks from primetime TV and the world of entertainment.

Hell on Wheels Season 1:

Hell on Wheels Season 1: "Bread and Circuses"

By Royal Nonesuch in Reviews on December 5, 2011

If you've never seen a train spin its wheels before, check out this episode. 

Podcast: Probably Comics 007

Podcast: Probably Comics 007

By Christian in Podcasts on December 5, 2011

The Probably Comics Podcast returns, reviewing all of last week's hottest comics!

RUviews: Is Something Going On With DC?

RUviews: Is Something Going On With DC?

By GHERU in Columns on December 5, 2011

The long awaited (ok, yea, not really) NuDC episode of RUviews is here.  Enjoy, and also, beware of the SPOILERS!The Flash, Justice League Dark, Batman, and a special note on Annihilators: Earthfall

Life

Life

By David Bird in Blog on December 5, 2011

Life (2007-2009)NBC, Starring Damian LewisTypically I have been reviewing movies on Mondays, but todayI am going to review the TV series Life, which ran on NBC for 32 episodes overa year and a half.Charlie Crews (Lewis) is a LA cop wrongly convicted for themurder of a friend and the friend’s entire family. He is released after twelveyears with a huge settlement and his job back—actually, with a promotion: he’snow a detective. He found religion in prison, something that’s made a bigimpact on his life, but now he finds himself continually in conflict: Zenmaster versus answers and/or revenge? He doesn’t have to pull at many threadsbefore a vast conspiracy begins to unravel, connecting his conviction to roguecops, the FBI, and a psychotic Russian mobster. He’s aided in his search by aformer inmate, a partner who may have connections to the rogue cops, and a castof interesting, well defined characters.I like this show a lot, but I have to admit I had neverheard of it until a friend forced the two DVD sets on me. TV is chalk full ofpolice procedurals nowadays and the prospect of watching another didn’t appealto me, but this one is very different. It is bookended by two very strongthings. The first is an interesting cast of characters, anchored by Lewis’great performance. In our post-Law &Order TV universe, formula is everything, but Charlie Crews is characterthat could have held the show together for years without becoming tired. Hewants peace and answers. He can’t have both, but he can’t be satisfied withjust one, and won’t be until all the questions are answered and people who areabove the law answer for what they’ve done. The other thing is a complex andcompelling conspiracy that creates links where you would least expect them,while still remaining convincing. The show does suffer towards the end,however, as the producers, realizing they needed to wrap things up, rushed toanswer as many questions as possible. The episodes themselves are great TV, butit’s disappointing to get a hint of what might have been, knowing there isn’tgoing to be any more.Re-reading what I’ve written so far, I realize I’ve made theshow sound a lot darker than it is. This is not dark show. Crews’ situation bringsa sense of absurdity into the show that never far away. He’s joined by AdamArkin as his ex-con roommate and financial advisor, and Sarah Shahi as hispartner Dani Reese. And, yes, the show is on Netflix.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

Life

Life

By David Bird in Blog on December 5, 2011

Life (2007-2009)NBC, Starring Damian LewisTypically I have been reviewing movies on Mondays, but todayI am going to review the TV series Life, which ran on NBC for 32 episodes overa year and a half.Charlie Crews (Lewis) is a LA cop wrongly convicted for themurder of a friend and the friend’s entire family. He is released after twelveyears with a huge settlement and his job back—actually, with a promotion: he’snow a detective. He found religion in prison, something that’s made a bigimpact on his life, but now he finds himself continually in conflict: Zenmaster versus answers and/or revenge? He doesn’t have to pull at many threadsbefore a vast conspiracy begins to unravel, connecting his conviction to roguecops, the FBI, and a psychotic Russian mobster. He’s aided in his search by aformer inmate, a partner who may have connections to the rogue cops, and a castof interesting, well defined characters.I like this show a lot, but I have to admit I had neverheard of it until a friend forced the two DVD sets on me. TV is chalk full ofpolice procedurals nowadays and the prospect of watching another didn’t appealto me, but this one is very different. It is bookended by two very strongthings. The first is an interesting cast of characters, anchored by Lewis’great performance. In our post-Law &Order TV universe, formula is everything, but Charlie Crews is characterthat could have held the show together for years without becoming tired. Hewants peace and answers. He can’t have both, but he can’t be satisfied withjust one, and won’t be until all the questions are answered and people who areabove the law answer for what they’ve done. The other thing is a complex andcompelling conspiracy that creates links where you would least expect them,while still remaining convincing. The show does suffer towards the end,however, as the producers, realizing they needed to wrap things up, rushed toanswer as many questions as possible. The episodes themselves are great TV, butit’s disappointing to get a hint of what might have been, knowing there isn’tgoing to be any more.Re-reading what I’ve written so far, I realize I’ve made theshow sound a lot darker than it is. This is not dark show. Crews’ situation bringsa sense of absurdity into the show that never far away. He’s joined by AdamArkin as his ex-con roommate and financial advisor, and Sarah Shahi as hispartner Dani Reese. And, yes, the show is on Netflix.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

ourvaluedcustomers: To his friend while discussing how BATMAN...

ourvaluedcustomers: To his friend while discussing how BATMAN...

By xaraan in Blog on December 4, 2011

ourvaluedcustomers: To his friend while discussing how BATMAN could be more realistic… Authors: xaraanRead more http://theouthouseblog.tumblr.com/post/13752484794

This Week In Punchy 12/04/11

This Week In Punchy 12/04/11

By Niam Suggitt in Reviews on December 4, 2011

It may only be a 5th week, but that doesn't mean we can't have a good time! Punchy takes a look at all of this week's big hitters!

Review: FF #12

Review: FF #12

By dtmills in Reviews on December 4, 2011

The FF kids are at it again in FF #12!

Why I Love Comics #61: Muppet talk!

Why I Love Comics #61: Muppet talk!

By Eric Ratcliffe in Podcasts on December 2, 2011

In this episode of the podcast, Eric is joined by Brian Osserman of the Outhouse...

American Horror Story:

American Horror Story: "Spooky Little Girl"

By Tricia Long in Reviews on December 2, 2011

What's better than two ghost ladies in the house trying to sleep with Ben? THREE ghost ladies!

Tales of Mr. Rhee: Chapter 8 - Part 6

Tales of Mr. Rhee: Chapter 8 - Part 6

By BKThomson aka Brad Thomson in Webcomics on December 1, 2011

Know Your Enemy

Review: Daredevil #6

Review: Daredevil #6

By TheGeek in Reviews on December 1, 2011

Daredevil is in the hottest seat of his life! Find out more in TheGeek's review of Daredevil #6!

Does DC need to prove Alan Moore right?

Does DC need to prove Alan Moore right?

By lol in Features on December 1, 2011

Watchmen 2 trends worldwide, as DC refuses to comment

Review: Hellboy: The House of the Living Dead

Review: Hellboy: The House of the Living Dead

By Dan Buckley in Reviews on November 30, 2011

A review of the newest Hellboy hardcover!

Tales of Mr. Rhee: Chapter 8 - Part 5

Tales of Mr. Rhee: Chapter 8 - Part 5

By BKThomson aka Brad Thomson in Webcomics on November 30, 2011

Know Your Enemy

Marvel First Looks: Scarlet Spider #1

Marvel First Looks: Scarlet Spider #1

By SuperginraiX in Previews on November 30, 2011

Finally, after all of these years, the Scarlet Spider gets to show off some preview pages.  Except it's not Ben Reilly.  Oh, well.

Chewing the Fat with Rob Guillory

Chewing the Fat with Rob Guillory

By Christian in Features on November 30, 2011


Your First Look At UNCANNY X-MEN #3!

Your First Look At UNCANNY X-MEN #3!

By Jude Terror in Previews on November 29, 2011

It's a preview of Uncanny X-Men #3 from Marvel Comics!

This Week In Punchy 11/29/11

This Week In Punchy 11/29/11

By Niam Suggitt in Reviews on November 29, 2011

Technical gremlins got in the way, but it's finally here! The only comics reviews you will ever need!

One Book, Two Book, Red Book, Blue Book: The Mighty Thor #8 vs. Aquaman #3

One Book, Two Book, Red Book, Blue Book: The Mighty Thor #8 vs. Aquaman #3

By Veggieleezy in Reviews on November 29, 2011

It's Atlantean King vs. Asgardian Prince!  Which book will reign supreme?

Starlord: Top to Bottom for 11/23

Starlord: Top to Bottom for 11/23

By Brian Burchette in Reviews on November 29, 2011

Here we are folks, a day late but with a winner to our first contest. Also a first in that this could be the highest scored week I've ever given.

The Outhouse Interview: Adrian Alphona

The Outhouse Interview: Adrian Alphona

By Royal Nonesuch in Features on November 29, 2011

The fan-favorite artist stops by The Outhouse to talk about where he's been, what he's been up to, and what he will be doing in the future!

Once Upon a Time: That Little Voice

Once Upon a Time: That Little Voice

By Tricia Long in Reviews on November 29, 2011

An episode that was shorter that expected on anthropomorphic crickets in top hats.

Image Preview: Madman 20th Anniversary Monster

Image Preview: Madman 20th Anniversary Monster

By SuperginraiX in Previews on November 28, 2011

Celebrate twenty years of Mike Allred's Madman with this book!

Marvel First Looks: Thor #9

Marvel First Looks: Thor #9

By SuperginraiX in Previews on November 28, 2011

Marvel unleashes some preview pages for Thor #9!

The Whatdead: Terry Moore on Rachel Rising #3

The Whatdead: Terry Moore on Rachel Rising #3

By Russ Burlingame in Features on November 28, 2011


Miracle On 34th Street

Miracle On 34th Street

By David Bird in Blog on November 28, 2011

Miracle on 34thStreet (1947)Directed by George Seaton, Starring Maureen O’Hara and EdmundGwennWho doesn’t like Miracle on 34th Street? A hit when it was released in 1947, it's continued to be a Christmas favourite for the last 64 years. Now that the holiday season is inarguably upon us, I thought I would watch my favourite classic holiday film. It starts with the Macy’s Thanksgiving parade. Kris Kringle discovers the parade’s Santa is drunk and complains to the woman in charge, Doris Walker. Given his white beard, rotund physique, and jolly disposition, he quickly finds himself with a job, one he distinguished himself in by sending Macy’s customers to the competition whenever Macy’s itself can’t provide what they’re looking for. It's a customer service that rebounds very well for the store and raises the question, isn’t there more to Christmas than commercialism?But that’s not what the movie is about. Mrs. Walker is the loving mother of a little girl, Susan, and is raising her to appreciate the real and the practical. Make-believe and fairy tales are not a part of the Walker household. This becomes a problem as Kringle becomes a bigger and bigger part of their lives. You see, he not only believes in Santa, he believes he is Santa. This raises the ire of Granville Sawyer, a personnel employee who fancies himself a psychiatrist. He’s the guy--girl--you know who reads a lot of self-help books and is all too happy to tell you everything that is wrong with you and why. Today he’d host his own show. Through provocations and lies he manages to get Kringle locked up at Bellevue and it's up to Frederick Gailey, a young lawyer who is also a neighbour and love interest for Walker, to get him out. All he has to do is convince the court that Kris Kringle really is Santa Claus.What the movie is really about is trust and faith and belief. About holding out for a world as you believe it should be, even if your life so far has been one of disappointments. The movie is well written--it was nominated for Oscars for writing and best picture, and won one for acting (Edmund Gwenn, who play Kris Kringle)--and it provides many practical explanations for events, while including an O. Henry-esque ending that opens the film to another possible interpretation. It's easy to think that Christmas used to be better. It can be a stressful time for grown ups. Bills and preparations and schedules and more bills. We forget what it was like when we were kids. Or, rather, we assume that back then adults enjoyed the same Christmases we did when we were kids, and don’t realize that they were as stressed as we are now, and that our children are as excited as we were when we were their age. What this movie reminds us is that the holiday can be whatever we choose it to be. There can be a Santa, gift, and festivities, or there can just be a kindly old man in a red suit, but sometimes that kindly old man might just be the real thing.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

Miracle On 34th Street

Miracle On 34th Street

By David Bird in Blog on November 28, 2011

Miracle on 34thStreet (1947)Directed by George Seaton, Starring Maureen O’Hara and EdmundGwennWho doesn’t like Miracle on 34th Street? A hit when it was released in 1947, it's continued to be a Christmas favourite for the last 64 years. Now that the holiday season is inarguably upon us, I thought I would watch my favourite classic holiday film. It starts with the Macy’s Thanksgiving parade. Kris Kringle discovers the parade’s Santa is drunk and complains to the woman in charge, Doris Walker. Given his white beard, rotund physique, and jolly disposition, he quickly finds himself with a job, one he distinguished himself in by sending Macy’s customers to the competition whenever Macy’s itself can’t provide what they’re looking for. It's a customer service that rebounds very well for the store and raises the question, isn’t there more to Christmas than commercialism?But that’s not what the movie is about. Mrs. Walker is the loving mother of a little girl, Susan, and is raising her to appreciate the real and the practical. Make-believe and fairy tales are not a part of the Walker household. This becomes a problem as Kringle becomes a bigger and bigger part of their lives. You see, he not only believes in Santa, he believes he is Santa. This raises the ire of Granville Sawyer, a personnel employee who fancies himself a psychiatrist. He’s the guy--girl--you know who reads a lot of self-help books and is all too happy to tell you everything that is wrong with you and why. Today he’d host his own show. Through provocations and lies he manages to get Kringle locked up at Bellevue and it's up to Frederick Gailey, a young lawyer who is also a neighbour and love interest for Walker, to get him out. All he has to do is convince the court that Kris Kringle really is Santa Claus.What the movie is really about is trust and faith and belief. About holding out for a world as you believe it should be, even if your life so far has been one of disappointments. The movie is well written--it was nominated for Oscars for writing and best picture, and won one for acting (Edmund Gwenn, who play Kris Kringle)--and it provides many practical explanations for events, while including an O. Henry-esque ending that opens the film to another possible interpretation. It's easy to think that Christmas used to be better. It can be a stressful time for grown ups. Bills and preparations and schedules and more bills. We forget what it was like when we were kids. Or, rather, we assume that back then adults enjoyed the same Christmases we did when we were kids, and don’t realize that they were as stressed as we are now, and that our children are as excited as we were when we were their age. What this movie reminds us is that the holiday can be whatever we choose it to be. There can be a Santa, gift, and festivities, or there can just be a kindly old man in a red suit, but sometimes that kindly old man might just be the real thing.Originally Pubished at: David Bird

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