Sunday, November 23, 2014 • Midnight Edition • "The CBR of comic book journalism."
Review: The Goon Volume 4 Virtue and the Grim Consequences Thereof

Review: The Goon Volume 4 Virtue and the Grim Consequences Thereof

By Rui Esteves in Blog on September 1, 2014

CoverThe Goon in Virtue and the Grim Consequences Thereof is a weird mixed of issue long stories. From that time when the Goon, together with a bunch of his fellow criminal friends, started a pro football team, to a journey into another dimension this book has it all.Unfortunately, unlike previous volumes, not all weirdness is good weirdness.The Goon doesn't follow a conventional story telling style, true, but there is usually an order to the Chaos that is put to paper by Powell. However in this volume there are a few stories that break that order and add even more chaos, but in a less than optimal way. I'm not saying this is a bad book, far from it, but Powell has been spoiling his readers with stellar story telling and fun comic books, and this one is just a bit above ok. The Goon getting drafted Personally I didn't connect with two stories in this collection, the one about the football team and the adaptation of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. The first one is just and atypical story for this book, its not funny nor it contributes to the overall mythos of the characters (at least thus far), while the second one add little no nothing new to the myriad of adaptations done of the A Christmas Carol. There is nothing wrong with them, but they're not Goonish enough (whatever that may be).However there is a strong reason to get this book, and that is everything else. Doctor Alloy goes insane and the Goon and our favorite eye stabber jump to his aid. Of course things don't go accourding to plan and the Goon's world is turn inside out. All this plus Powell's twisted humor and awesome artistic style.Talking about the art of the book, its really good. Powell manages to give each story its unique feel while at the same time keeping it consistent and true to the Goon style. Sometimes he does it through a different color pallet, sometimes ist by the way he draws faces. Its subtle changes that work really well. Frankie of Christmas Present In sum, half is great, half is meh. It's still worth your money, but it doesn't hit the awesomeness that are the previous volumes.Publisher: Dark HorseYear: 2010Pages: 144Authors: Eric PowellISBN: 1595826173Follow Reading Graphic Novels on Facebook and Twitter. Originally Published at Reading Graphic Novels http://readinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com/2014/09/review-goon-volume-4-virtue-and-grim.html

Planetary # 5 - Warren Ellis John Cassaday

Planetary # 5 - Warren Ellis John Cassaday

By Arion in Blog on August 27, 2014

Forget everything you were taught in school. The world has a secret history, a hidden past, something that can only be unearthed by the Archeologists of the Impossible. And what better way to understand the world’s secret history than by asking directly to one of its protagonists? That’s how “The Good Doctor” (September 1999) begins, as Elijah Snow asks Axel Brass a number of biographical questions.Brass shares his memories with Snow. And the latter shares with the former updates about the lives of the heroes of yore, such as Jenny Sparks or John Cumberland. Brass comes to the following conclusion “We crisscross the world, making it right, making it strange, and the people never see our coming or our going…”, which in a certain way is a metatextual reference to the origins and ends of the heroes that were popular more than half a century ago. Whatever happened to Doc Savage, The Shadow or Flash Gordon is as much as a mystery to the new generations as one could expect, after all, new readers are interested in new characters, or at least in new interpretations of the classic myths, but it’s very rare to see new readers revising material published before their parents were born.  Another important aspect in this conversation is the Hark Corporation. In the 40s, Brass and Hark were close allies, however, as we saw in the first chapter, everyone dies violently except Axel Brass. Anna Hark, the daughter, takes her father’s money and inventions and turns it all into a corporation “in the Western mold”, and she quickly grows rich in America. That’s another example of how the heroic nature of the progenitor can completely disappear in just one generation. In 1999 the Hark Corporation is one of the world’s largest and most powerful companies, but also one of the most sinister and dangerous.  The heroes of yesteryear/ Los héroes de antaño In “The Good Doctor”, British writer Warren Ellis pays homage to the popular pulp novels from the 40s. As we have seen in the first issue of Planetary, Doc Brass is an alternative version of Doc Savage, the Man of Bronze, perhaps the quintessential pulp hero. And artist extraordinaire John Cassaday recovers the mythical dimension of Brass / Savage in an amazing cover quite reminiscent of the old pulp novels. Nevertheless, that is not the only artistic exploration that deserves its own recognition. There are several pages that are presented as actual pages of a pulp book, even with yellow and worn-out paper. There is a remarkable double page spread which shows Doc Brass fighting against arachnid creatures, half-spiders, half-men, surrounded by monstrous fetuses of this unnatural species. The masterful composition, the intensity and the horror of this sequence are undeniable. There is another anthological illustration: Brass and his men fighting against demonic creatures. Symmetry, dynamism and plenty of details turn this into an unforgettable scene. Cassaday also plays here with the contrast between light (Brass, at the top of the page) and shadow (the masked vigilante at the bottom).Finally, the last page gathers different moods: we have the cheerful joy of Brass and his victorious men, and then we have a tired and almost saddened Elijah Snow. The final silent frame is pure visual poetry, aided by the stunning coloring by Laura Depuy and Ali Fuchs. Axel Brass versus the arachnid menace / Axel Brass versus la amenaza arácnida________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Extrordinary composition / composición extraordinariaOlvidad todo lo que aprendisteis en la escuela. El mundo tiene una historia secreta, un pasado oculto, algo que sólo puede ser desenterrado por los Arqueólogos de lo Imposible. ¿Y qué mejor modo de entender la historia secreta del mundo que preguntándole directamente a uno de sus protagonistas? Así es cómo empieza “El buen doctor” (setiembre de 1999), cuando Elijah Snow le hace a Axel Brass una serie de preguntas autobiográficas.Brass comparte sus recuerdos con Snow. Y Snow comparte con él datos actuales sobre las vidas de los héroes de antaño, tales como Jenny Sparks o John Cumberland. Brass llega a la siguiente conclusión “Cruzamos el mundo, para hacer lo correcto, para volverlo extraño, y la gente jamás ve nuestras idas o venidas…”, lo que en cierto modo es una referencia metatextual a los orígenes y los finales de los héroes que fueron populares hace más de medio siglo. Lo que sea que le sucediese a Doc Savage, The Shadow o Flash Gordon es un misterio para las nuevas generaciones, como uno podría esperar, después de todo, los nuevos lectores están interesados en nuevos personajes, o por lo menos en nuevas interpretaciones de los mitos clásicos, pero es muy raro ver a nuevos lectores revisando material que se publicó antes que sus padres hubiesen nacido. Otro aspecto importante en esta conversación es la Corporación Hark. En los 40s, Brass y Hark fueron aliados cercanos, sin embargo, como vimos en el primer capítulo, todos mueren violentamente excepto Axel Brass. Anna Hark, la hija, toma el dinero y los inventos del padre y convierte todo ello en una corporación “en el molde occidental”, y rápidamente se enriquece en Estados Unidos. Ese es otro ejemplo de cómo la naturaleza heroica del progenitor puede desaparecer completamente en tan sólo una generación. En 1999, la Corporación Hark es una de las empresas más grandes y poderosas del mundo, pero también una de las más siniestras y peligrosas.   Remembering the past / Recordando el pasadoEn “El buen doctor”, el escritor británico Warren Ellis rinde homenaje a las populares novelas pulp de los 40s. Como vimos en el primer número de Planetary, Doc Brass es una version alternativa de Doc Savage, el Hombre de Bronce, tal vez la quintaesencia del héroe pulp. Y el extraordinario artista John Cassaday recupera la dimensión mítica de Brass / Savage en una asombrosa portada bastante reminiscente de las viejas novelas pulp.No obstante, esa no es la única exploración artística que merece reconocimiento. Hay varias páginas que son presentadas como páginas de un libro pulp, incluso con papel gastado y amarillento. Hay una notable página doble que muestra a Doc Brass peleando contra criaturas arácnidas, mitad arañas, mitad hombres, rodeado de monstruosos fetos de esta especia anti-natural. La magistral composición, la intensidad y el terror de esta secuencia son innegables. Hay otra ilustración de antología: Brass y sus hombres pelando contra criaturas demoníacas. Simetría, dinamismo y abundancia de detalles hace de esta una escena inolvidable. Cassaday también juega aquí con el contraste entre luz (Brass, en la parte superior de la página) y sombra (el vigilante enmascarado en la parte inferior).Finalmente, la última página reúne diferentes estados de ánimo: tenemos la gozosa celebración de Brass y sus hombres victoriosos, y luego tenemos a un cansado y casi entristecido Elijah Snow. La viñeta final muda es pura poesía visual, ayudada por el espectacular coloreado de Laura Depuy y Ali Fuchs.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/planetary-5-warren-ellis-john-cassaday.html

Miracleman # 8 - Alan Moore Chuck Austen

Miracleman # 8 - Alan Moore Chuck Austen

By Arion in Blog on August 24, 2014

As a veteran horror fan, I’ve seen plenty of persecutions, hundreds of movies about people being chased by something awful, monstrous, supernatural and terribly lethal. And I’ve gotten used to it to the point that now I find those scenes barely surprising. In “Bodies”, however, the suspense is very intense (“Bodies” was originally published in Eclipse’s Miracleman # 7, in April 1986). Michael Moran is being hunted by an extraterrestrial hound. Evelyn Cream has already been devoured. And he’s next. Unless he can find a way to escape from the monster. Moran’s first instinct is to use the gun Cream gave to him to shoot at the scaly creature. But he’s too slow, too clumsy, too human. The monster simply eats part of his hand and the revolver.As we’ve seen in earlier chapters, the contrast between Miracleman and Moran was more than evident. The Superman was superior to the man in every conceivable way. That is why Moran has no trust in his own abilities, and yet his survival instinct remains intact. Thanks to a clever ruse, Moran is able to use the key word “Steppenwolf” to revert the creature to his original state: a defenseless, normal dog.    “The Wish I Wish Tonight” is an extraordinary example of Alan Moore’s brilliant exploration of characters. Miracleman is back, a superhuman amongst ordinary people, a wolf surrounded by sheep. Moore gets inside the head of Gargunza’s ruthless killers, and inside the head of one of them in particular. A former Nazi soldier remembers Hitler’s dream of the Übermensch, the superior race: “He was a vision… That blond hair. Those blue eyes […] We waited for him to come for forty years… and then we killed him”. Michael Moran versus Miracledog For the Nazi mercenary, Miracleman was the superior man Hitler had promised to his SS troops. And he feels remorse for helping Gargunza in his homicidal plans. “Forty years we have waited for you. For the first of the blond gods that would replace us. Overman. You have come at last”, says the mercenary, almost as if pleading for his life. Miracleman’s reaction is terribly inhuman: he has already crushed the skulls of the other two henchmen, and now he simply breaks the Nazi’s chest with his finger, killing him immediately.There is something almost demential in Miracleman’s apparent cruelty, but at the same time it’s reassuring to observe how a superhuman uses his superpowers without any limits or moral constraints. He kills everyone and everything in his path until reaching Gargunza. The hunted victim of the first pages is now the merciless hunter.“Can you see the planet, how big it is? Can you see the scale I live on? Gargunza, can you see how small you have always been?”, asks Miracleman. And in an unexpected and very shocking scene, Miracleman decides to put an end to the life of his creator. Moore combines a moment of tenderness (the “kiss of death” that Miracleman gives to the scientist) with a brutal sequence that shows how Gargunza’s body is incinerated upon entry in our planet’s atmosphere.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Miracleman kills Gargunza's men / Miracleman mata a los hombres de GargunzaComo fanático veterano del terror, he visto muchas persecuciones, cientos de películas sobre gente que es cazada por algo horrendo, monstruoso, sobrenatural y terriblemente letal. Y me he acostumbrado a ello al punto que ahora esas escenas apenas me sorprenden. En “Cuerpos”, sin embargo, el suspenso es muy intenso (“Cuerpos” se publicó originalmente en Miracleman # 7 de Eclipse, en abril de 1986). Michael Moran está a punto de ser cazado por un sabueso extraterrestre. Evelyn Cream ya ha sido devorado. Y él es el siguiente. A menos que pueda hallar el modo de escapar del monstruo. El primer instinto de Moran es usar el arma que Cream le dio para disparar a la criatura escamosa. Pero él es demasiado lento, demasiado torpe, demasiado humano. El monstruo simplemente se come parte de su mano y el revólver.Como hemos visto en capítulos anteriores, el contraste entre Miracleman y Moran era más que evidente. El superhombre era superior al hombre en cada aspecto imaginable. Es por ello que Moran no tiene confianza en sus propias habilidades, y no obstante su instinto de supervivencia permanece intacto. Gracias a una astuta treta, Moran es capaz de usar la palabra clave “Steppenwolf” para revertir a la criatura a su estado original: un perro normal e indefenso.“El deseo que yo deseo esta noche” es un extraordinario ejemplo de la brillante exploración de personajes de Alan Moore. Miracleman ha regresado, un súper-humano entre gente ordinaria, un lobo rodeado de ovejas. Moore se mete en la cabeza de los despiadados asesinos de Gargunza, y al interior de la cabeza de uno de ellos en particular. Un ex-soldado nazi que recuerda el sueño de Hitler del Übermensch, la raza superior: “Él era una visión... Ese pelo rubio. Esos ojos azules […] Esperamos su llegada por cuarenta años… y luego lo matamos”. the kiss of death / el beso de la muertePara el mercenario nazi, Miracleman era el hombre superior que Hitler había prometido a sus tropas de la SS. Y siente remordimiento al ayudar a Gargunza en sus planes homicidas. “Cuarenta años hemos esperado por ti. Por el primero de los dioses rubios que nos reemplazarían. Sobre-Hombre. Has venido por fin”, dice el mercenario, casi como si rogara por su vida. La reacción de Miracleman es terriblemente inhumana: ya ha destrozado el cráneo de los otros dos matones, y ahora simplemente rompe el pecho del nazi con un dedo, matándolo de inmediato.Hay algo casi demencial en la aparente crueldad de Miracleman, pero al mismo tiempo es convincente observar cómo un súper-humano usa sus superpoderes sin límites ni restricciones morales. Mata a todos y a todo en su camino hasta llegar a Gargunza. La víctima cazada de las primeras páginas es ahora el cazador sin piedad.“¿Puedes ver el planeta?, ¿lo grande que es? ¿Puedes ver la escala en la que vivo? Gargunza, ¿puedes ver lo pequeño siempre has sido?”, pregunta Miracleman. Y en una inesperada e impactante escena, Miracleman decide darle fin a la vida de su creador. Moore combina un momento de ternura (el “beso de la muerte” que Miracleman le da al científico) con una brutal secuencia que muestra el cuerpo de Gargunza que se incinera al entrar en la atmósfera de nuestro planeta.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/miracleman-8-alan-moore-chuck-austen.html

The Pro - Garth Ennis Amanda Conner

The Pro - Garth Ennis Amanda Conner

By Arion in Blog on August 18, 2014

Most superheroes have secret identities and a civilian life. Clark Kent, for instance, is a journalist. Hawkman is an archeologist. Daredevil is a lawyer. Hulk is a scientist. Doctor Strange is a surgeon. And so on. Throughout many decades, we’ve become familiar with the fact that superheroes have normal, decent jobs. But isn’t it slightly baffling that out of the thousands of characters from Marvel or DC none of them has a controversial career, so to speak? Well, Irish writer Garth Ennis probably asked himself the same question. Why do all superheroes must have a decent and respectable job? Why can’t they be something else? The answer comes unapologetically in the pages of “The Pro”, a tale about “a superpowered prostitute with a lousy attitude”.The story begins with a street whore, a woman who tries to make a few bucks to feed her baby and pay the rent. A woman without hope, without joy, with nothing but the searing certainty that all she can do in life is suck cocks or bend down to get penetrated by stingy men who always try to pay her less than they should.That’s how her life goes until the Viewer (AKA the Voyeur), a merciless parody of Marvel’s the Watcher, decides to intervene and grants her amazing superpowers. Suddenly she can fly, she has super-strength and superhuman endurance. The Pro punishes the enemy / la Pro castiga al enemigoOf course, even with powers she is still a bitch. She swears, she smokes and she has no problems in accusing the members of the League of Honor of being the greatest perverts she’s ever met. Even so, she’s welcomed into the ranks of the world’s premiere superhero team. Once again, Ennis satirical approach dissects the classic superhero archetypes and turns the Justice League of America into a group of do-gooders with a holier-than-thou behavior. Although their perversions are hidden under this peaceful and respectable façade.When the League tries to save the UN, The Pro points out how all those ambassadors pay for the weirdest and kinkiest sexual encounters one could possibly imagine. Her “golden shower” moment can’t compare with the depravities she has seen in the past. Obviously, the vulgarity, the wild sexuality and profanity of The Pro scandalizes all members of the League. Especially the Saint, a Superman parody, who eventually is seduced by the prostitute and agrees to a blow job proposal that will have major repercussions for his sanctimonious reputation.The Lady, a Wonder Woman parody, exhibits certain lesbian tendencies, while Speedo, a Flash parody, can’t stop masturbating in the presence of the Pro. At super-speed, of course, he’s able to ejaculate and wipe out his dick without anyone taking notice of his actions…  The Saint gets a blow job / el Santo recibe sexo oralOf course, no satire would be complete without rubbing in a little bit of Wertham’s fears. As suggested by the psychiatrist, Batman and Robin are the ultimate gay couple, although they’ve never been as obviously out of the closet as Knight and Squire (parodies of the Dynamic Duo). Finally, the Lime is the typical black character that exists only to act like a black man, in the most stereotyped manner (similar, certainly, to the way in which minorities were inappropriately portrayed in the 50s and 60s), reaffirming the inherent racism in a world populated by white superheroes. Surely, as a reader you won’t be able to stop laughing as the absurd adventures of the Pro go on, but the humor doesn’t take away the social criticism. In the end, there is a bitter affirmation about this wonderful and colorful universe of escapism. Superheroes don’t matter, nothing they do has real consequences, they claim to save humanity but they are unable help regular people, they can’t change our society so that impoverished women like the Pro won’t have to sell their bodies in order to survive. Perhaps, for Ennis, the real prostitution lies in corporate trademarks and franchises disguised as cultural icons, and in the greedy nature of editors and businessmen who want only to squeeze every dollar out of the pockets of mindless fanboys that will endlessly consume the latest iteration of their favorite childhood heroes.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Speedo masturbates at superspeed / Speedo se masturba a súpervelocidadCasi todos los superhéroes tienen identidades secretas y una vida como civiles. Clark Kent, por ejemplo, es periodista. Hawkman es arqueólogo. Daredevil es abogado. Hulk es científico. Doctor Strange es un cirujano. Y así sucesivamente. A lo largo de las décadas, nos hemos familiarizado con el hecho de que los superhéroes tienen trabajos normales y decentes. Pero ¿no es ligeramente sorprendente que de los miles de personajes de Marvel o DC, ninguno de ellos tenga una carrera controversial, por así decirlo? Bueno, el escritor irlandés Garth Ennis probablemente se hizo esa misma pregunta. ¿Por qué todos los superhéroes deben tener empleos decentes y respetables? ¿Por qué no pueden ser algo distinto? La respuesta llega, sin pedir disculpas, en las páginas de “The Pro”, un relato sobre “una prostituta superpoderosa con una muy mala actitud”.La historia empieza con una ramera callejera, una mujer que intenta ganar algunos dólares para alimentar a su bebé y pagar el alquiler. Una mujer sin esperanza, sin alegría, con la certeza demoledora de que lo único que puede hacer en la vida es chupar penes o agacharse para ser penetrada por hombres tacaños que siempre intentan pagarle menos de lo que deberían.Y esa es su vida hasta que el Observador (también conocido como el Voyeur), una despiadada parodia de Watcher, de Marvel, decide intervenir y otorgarle asombrosos superpoderes. Repentinamente, ella puede volar, tiene súper fuerza y resistencia sobrehumana.  The League of Honor / la Liga del HonorDesde luego, incluso con poderes sigue siendo una puta. Maldice, fuma y no tiene empacho en acusar a los miembros de la Liga del Honor de ser los más grandes pervertidos que ha conocido. Aun así, ella es aceptada en las filas del primer equipo de superhéroes del mundo. Una vez más, el enfoque satírico de Ennis disecciona los clásicos arquetipo heroicos y convierte a la Liga de la Justicia de América en un grupo de bienhechores con comportamiento de santurrones. Aunque sus perversiones se ocultan bajo esta respetable y pacífica fachada. Cuando la Liga intenta salvar a la ONU, la Pro señala que estos embajadores pagan por los más extraños y degenerados encuentros sexuales que uno podría imaginar. Su “lluvia dorada” no se puede comparar con las depravaciones que ha visto en el pasado. Obviamente, la vulgaridad, sexualidad salvaje y la profanidad de la Pro escandalizan a todos los integrantes de la Liga. Especialmente al Santo, una parodia de Superman, quien eventualmente es seducido por la prostituta y accede a una propuesta de sexo oral que tendrá graves repercusiones para su sacrosanta reputación.La dama, una parodia de Wonder Woman, exhibe ciertas tendencias lésbicas, mientras que Speedo, una parodia de Flash, no puede parar de masturbarse en presencia de la Pro. A súper velocidad, por supuesto, es capaz de eyacular y limpiarse el pene sin que nadie se pueda dar cuenta de sus actividades...  The Pro uses her powers to make a few bucks / la Pro usa sus poderes para ganar algunos dólaresPor supuesto, ninguna sátira estaría completa sin frotar un poco los miedos de Wertham. Como sugirió el psiquiatra, Batman y Robin son la pareja gay definitiva, aunque ellos nunca han estado tan obviamente fuera del closet como Caballero y Escudero (parodias del Dúo Dinámico). Finalmente, Lima es el típico personaje negro que existe únicamente para actuar como un hombre negro, de la manera más estereotipada (similar, ciertamente, a la forma en la que las minorías eran inadecuadamente retratadas en los 50s y 60s), reafirmando el racismo inherente en un mundo poblado por superhéroes blancos. Seguramente, como lectores no serán capaces de dejar de reír con las absurdas aventuras de la Pro, pero el humor no quita la crítica social. Al final, hay una amarga afirmación sobre este maravilloso y colorido universo de escapismo. Los superhéroes no importan, nada de lo que hacen tiene consecuencias reales, ellos profesan haber salvado a la humanidad pero no son capaces de ayudar a la gente común y corriente, ellos no pueden cambiar nuestra sociedad para que mujeres empobrecidas como la Pro no tengan que vender sus cuerpos para lograr sobrevivir. Tal vez, para Ennis, la verdadera prostitución yace en las marcas registradas corporativas y en las franquicias disfrazadas de íconos culturales, y en la naturaleza avariciosa de editores y empresarios que únicamente quieren exprimir cada dólar de los bolsillos de fans insensatos que consumirán sin fin la más moderna versión de sus héroes favoritos de la infancia.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/the-pro-garth-ennis-amanda-conner.html

Aspen Comics Solicitations for November 2014

Aspen Comics Solicitations for November 2014

By Rui Esteves in Blog on August 15, 2014

Zoohunters #2THE ZOOHUNTERS #2 Peter Steigerwald – Story / Peter Steigerwald – ArtThere IS life on other planets—THEY find it.Abros has been teaching his son Ty the skills it takes to be a ZooHunter when on a far frozen planet they are ambushed by the rogue ZooHunter Minalara! What menace does her appearance spell for our duo? Read issue two to find out!Creator and artist Peter Steigerwald presents to you the newest Aspen hit series – THE ZOOHUNTERS!THE ZOOHUNTERS #2 is in stores November 26th, 2014!FC 32 pages $3.99 Damsels in Excess #5DAMSELS IN EXCESS #5 Vince Hernandez – Story / Mirka Andolfo – ArtFive realms. Five princesses. Zero men.The war for Evanfar begins as Bethany and Kimberlein make the decision to take back the kingdom by force—even if it means destroying the union of the Five Realms forever! The climactic—and deadly--end to the first volume will forever change the lives of all the princesses forever!DAMSELS IN EXCESS #5 is in stores November 19th, 2014!FC 32 pages $3.99 Seven to DieSEVEN TO DIE  T. G. Roberts – WriterSEVEN TO DIE tells the story of Lex MacArthur, a San Francisco college student who comes into possession of an enigmatic clay pendant that unlocks a bevy of dormant superhuman genes. She’s stronger, she’s faster, and she’s on a mission to find out why. As Lex sets out to discover who she is and where she really came from, she comes face-to-face with Egil, a killer who has been tracking Lex her entire life.  At the helm of an enormous operation to eradicate all of Lex’s kind, Egil captures Lex’s long-lost mother, forcing Lex to confront him head on and save those she loves from certain death.Aspen Novels continues its genre-spanning adventure into the prose world with this latest young adult, urban fantasy thriller that is an edge-of-your-seat page turner!SEVEN TO DIE is in stores November 5th, 2014!B&W 320 pages $7.99 NOVEL Follow Reading Graphic Novels on Facebook and Twitter. Originally Published at Reading Graphic Novels http://readinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com/2014/08/aspen-comics-solicitations-for-november.html

Miracleman # 6 7 - Alan Moore Alan Davis

Miracleman # 6 7 - Alan Moore Alan Davis

By Arion in Blog on August 13, 2014

Miracleman attacks! / ¡Miracleman ataca!While Doctor Gargunza tells Liz Moran the details of his horrid past, Miracleman and Evelyn Cream track down the old villain and find his well-guarded villa. But the security personnel is no match for the invincible Miracleman.Nevertheless, “…And Every Dog Its Day” (August 1984) shows the defeat of Miracleman, as he is outwitted by his “creator”, Doctor Gargunza. Once again, Alan Moore re-elaborates classic superhero plot twists but in this case he does it so amazingly that the reader is rooting simultaneously for the hero as well as the villain. Unfortunately, it is in this chapter that Alan Davis says goodbye to the Northampton writer. And consequently “All Heads Turn as the Hunt Goes By” (February 1986) is illustrated by Chuck Austen (or Chuck Beckum as he was known back in the day). Although Chuck Austen’s abilities aren’t nearly as impressive as the ones we find in Alan Davis or Garry Leach, Chuck still manages to give us a very correct visual interpretation of Moore’s script.Evelyn Cream, the man with sapphire teeth, England’s most ruthless killer is defenseless against a monstrous creature engineered in the labs of Doctor Gargunza. Using a fascinating game of frames and panels, Moore presents to us the entire persecution as a single moment in time, thus augmenting the suspense and the sense of fear experienced by Michael Moran and Evelyn Cream. MiracledogI’ve often wondered, as a writer, when to kill a character. It’s not an easy choice and it becomes even more complicated when we have a fascinating character in mind. If the most appealing, most intriguing and most mysterious hero is on the line, do we let him go or do we retrieve him for future plotlines? For example, I wonder how George R.R. Martin manages to create so many fantastic men and women in the pages of his novels and how he gets to decide who lives and who dies. Obviously I cannot know the motives behind the writer’s work, but I can see the results. And the result of this chapter is devastating: Evelyn Cream is beheaded with a single movement, and quickly devoured by an alien beast designed to kill Miracleman. The last page, pure genius (but then again, we are talking about Alan Moore), shows the green and scaly lizard spitting out some undigested residuals. There is blood and there is, of course, the sapphire teeth of Evelyn Cream.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Michael Moran & Evelyn CreamMientras el doctor Gargunza le cuenta a Liz Moran los detalles de su horrendo pasado,  Miracleman y Evelyn Cream rastrean al viejo villano y encuentran su resguardada villa. Pero el personal de seguridad no es rival para el invencible Miracleman.No obstante, “…Y cada día de perro” (agosto de 1984) muestra la derrota de Miracleman, que es superado en astucia por su “creador”, el doctor Gargunza. Una vez más, Alan Moore reelabora giros argumentales de superhéroes clásicos pero en este caso lo hace tan asombrosamente que el lector está entusiasmado simultáneamente con el héroe así como con el villano.Desafortunadamente, es en este capítulo en el que Alan Davis le dice adiós al escritor de Northampton. Y en consecuencia “Todas las cabezas se voltean mientras la cacería continúa” (febrero de 1986) tiene ilustraciones de Chuck Austen (o Chuck Beckum como se le conocía en ese entonces). Aunque las habilidades de Chuck Austen no son para nada tan impresionantes como las de Alan Davis o Garry Leach, Chuck aun así se las arregla para darnos una correcta interpretación visual del guión de Moore.Evelyn Cream, el hombre de los dientes de zafiro, el más despiadado asesino de Inglaterra, está indefenso frente a una criatura monstruosa creada en los laboratorios del doctor Gargunza. Usando un fascinante juego de encuadres y viñetas, Moore nos presenta toda la persecución como un sólo momento en el tiempo, aumentando así el suspenso y la sensación de miedo experimentada por Michael Moran y Evelyn Cream. man against beast / el hombre contra la bestiaComo escritor, me he preguntado a menudo cuándo matar a un personaje. No es una alternativa fácil y se vuelve más complicada cuando tenemos en mente a un personaje fascinante. Si el héroes más atractivo, más intrigante y misterioso, está al borde del abismo, ¿lo dejamos caer o lo recuperamos para futuras líneas argumentales? Me pregunto, por ejemplo, cómo se las arregla George R.R. Martin para crear tantos hombres y mujeres fantásticos en las páginas de sus novelas y cómo decide quién vive y quién muere.Obviamente no puedo saber los motivos detrás de la obra del escritor, pero puedo ver los resultados. Y el resultado de este capítulo es devastador: Evelyn Cream es decapitado con un sólo movimiento, y es rápidamente devorado por una bestia alienígena diseñada para matar a Miracleman. La última página es una genialidad pura (claro está, hablamos al fin y al cabo de Alan Moore), vemos al lagarto de escamas verdes escupiendo algunos residuos que no han sido digeridos. Ahí está la sangre y también están, por supuesto, los dientes de zafiro de Evelyn Cream.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/miracleman-6-7-alan-moore-alan-davis.html

July comic books / cómics de julio

July comic books / cómics de julio

By Arion in Blog on August 10, 2014

With half a dozen of great comics, July proves to be a very fruitful month. Although nothing could be better than Miracleman, the second chapter of The Wicked + The Divine wins the award of best single issue of the month. I must say that the beginning of Kirkman’s Outcast was quite good, and Silver Surfer continues to be a fun title. And now without further ado, here are July’s comics as per solicitations: MIRACLEMAN #8 (W)  Various (A) Chuck Austen (CA) John Romita • Miracleman vs. Miracledog! • Miracleman and Gargunza. Their dreams have been intertwined since 1954. Tonight, one will realize his dream, and the other… • Including stories originally presented in MIRACLEMAN #7-8, plus bonus material. OUTCAST BY KIRKMAN & AZACETA #1 (MR) (W) Robert Kirkman (A) Paul Azaceta, Elizabeth Breitweiser (CA) Paul Azaceta. NEW HORROR SERIES FROM THE WALKING DEAD CREATOR ROBERT KIRKMAN! Kyle Barnes has been plagued by demonic possession all his life and now he needs answers. Unfortunately, what he uncovers along the way could bring about the end of life on Earth as we know it. SILVER SURFER #4 (W) Dan Slott (A) Michael Allred, Michael Allred • In order to return alien abductee Dawn Greenwood home, the Surfer must travel to the one place in the galaxy he dreads the most... Planet Earth! • And what should be a quick drop off turns into turns into one very... strange adventure. • Featuring: DOCTOR STRANGE, THE INCREDIBLE HULK, and some surprise guest stars. Including those movie stars on the cover! WAKE #7 (OF 10) (MR) (W) Scott Snyder (A) Sean Murphy (CA) Andrew Robinson. Two hundred years in the future, things are not looking good for the human race. But a mysterious call from the deep could change everything. The epic, flooded future of THE WAKE continues here! WICKED & DIVINE #2 (MR) (W) Kieron Gillen (A) Jamie McKelvie, Matthew Wilson (CA) Matthew Wilson, Jamie McKelvie. Diabolically divine pop-god Lucifer is in trouble. She offers superfan Laura an unprecedented deal if she helps. It's a bargain. A Faustian bargain, and they always turn out so well. Who knows who Laura will turn to fulfill it? We do. Clearly. It's our comic. You can know too if you buy this fine pictorial narrative with your human money coins. my drawing still in process / mi dibujo todavía en proceso________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Con media docena de cómics de primer nivel, julio demuestra ser un mes fructífero. Aunque nada podría ser mejor que Miracleman, el segundo capítulo de The Wicked + The Divine gana el premio al mejor número del mes. Debo decir que el inicio de Outcast de Kirkman fue bastante bueno, y Silver Surfer continúa siendo un título divertido. Y ahora, sin más preámbulos, ahí van los cómics de julio: MIRACLEMAN #8¡Miracleman versus Gargunza!OUTCAST BY KIRKMAN & AZACETA #1 (MR)Kyle ha sido asediado por posesiones demoníacas toda su vida y ahora necesita respuestas. Por desgracia, esas respuestas podrían ser su fin. SILVER SURFER #4Para regresar a un extraterrestre secuestrado a su hogar, SILVER SURFER deberá viajar al lugar de la galaxia que más le desagrada: la Tierra.WAKE #7Las cosas no pintan del todo bien para la raza humana 200 años en el futuro. Pero una misteriosa llamada desde la profundidad oceánica podría cambiarlo todo en este mundo inundado.  WICKED & DIVINE #2 (MR)Lucifer, deidad diabólicamente divina del pop, está en un buen lío. Le ofrece a la súper fan Laura un trato sin precedentes. Un trato con el diablo. Un trato faustiano, de esos que siempre terminan tan bien. ¿A quién acudirá Laura para cumplir con este trato? Averiguadlo comprando esta grandiosa narrativa pictórica con vuestras monedas humanas.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/july-comic-books-comics-de-julio.html

Pájaros en la cabeza - Mónica Cuba Isabelle Decencière

Pájaros en la cabeza - Mónica Cuba Isabelle Decencière

By Arion in Blog on August 8, 2014

I started this blog a long time ago, or at least that’s how it feels to me. It’s hard to remember what was going on in my life in 2010 when I started posting my drawings here, and getting less than a thousand visitors a month. Today, any day actually, I get at least 2,000 visits, which translates to 60,000 visits a month.  blog information (please click on it for a larger version) / información del blog (hagan click para agrandar)I guess I’ve learned a few things about Search Engine Optimization, key words, digital ads and so on. 2014 has been the best year for this blog, not only because visits have increased considerably, but also because for the first time in my life I’m actually making money with this. Granted, it’s only a couple of bucks a month, but still that’s so much better than zero cents. my drawing still in process / mi dibujo todavía en procesoCertainly, I thank you –all of you– for your continuous support. Without you, the reader, this blog would have disappeared a long time ago. In recent months I’ve understood that I have a responsibility to my readers so I’ve tried to improve the quality of my posts, that means that now I’m giving more priority to what I write about instead of how often I do it. That is why you can observe that now I post less frequently… The second change you can observe is that now I’m writing less about art galleries and more about comic books. The reason is quite simple: most of my posts about contemporary art receive less visits than the average post, and sometimes they get zero comments. The conclusion is obvious: people come here to read about comics and films but not necessarily about art galleries, which is fine by me. I’ll continue talking about art exhibitions, as they are a part of my life, but I won’t do it as often as I used to.Just to show you an example of what I’m talking about, I’m attaching a list of posts so you can see how many visits I get for each one of them. My article about Bryan Singer’s sexual scandal, aptly titled “Days of Scandals Past” has received over one thousand hits, my posts about comics have more than one hundred visits (combining the amount of hits, the total would be around 500), and the final post has only 72 hits, and it’s no coincidence that it is a post dedicated to an art exhibition. I rest my case. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Ayer jueves se inauguró en Dédalo la muestra bipersonal “Pájaros en la cabeza” de Mónica Cuba e Isabelle Decencière, grandes amigas y talentosas artistas que han reunido su creatividad en un proyecto admirable. Con esculturas y piezas ornamentales de cerámica y madera, ambas artistas han explorado la frase que da título a la muestra, fabricando primorosamente personajes con pájaros que anidan en sus cabezas. La curaduría de la muestra es notable, y eso se hace evidente al ver la forma en que las piezas de Mónica dialogan con las de Isabelle, llenando el espacio de colorido y armonía.Por supuesto, apenas llegué a Dédalo las saludé y las felicité por una muestra tan maravillosa. Luego me quedé conversando un par de horas con mi amigo Andreé Ferro, así que tuve oportunidad de hablar sobre mi viaje a Santa Cruz (Bolivia), los enredos de la Embajada de Malasia y los nuevos proyectos que, desde ahora, estoy preparando.Les recomiendo que se den una vuelta por Sáenz Peña y visitan la sala de exposiciones de Dédalo. Quedarán sorprendidos al ver obras de tan alto vuelo.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/pajaros-en-la-cabeza-monica-cuba.html

Swamp Thing # 61, 62, 63 64 - Moore, Veitch Bissette

Swamp Thing # 61, 62, 63 64 - Moore, Veitch Bissette

By Arion in Blog on August 4, 2014

Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing, like all literary masterpieces, was in constant evolution. It began as a horror title, then it started combining “sophisticated suspense” with fantasy, but in the final issues the shift towards science fiction was more than evident. Furthermore, Alan Moore’s ability to rescue old DC heroes from the Silver Age and turning them into fascinating characters was an unparalleled success.  Green Lantern versus Swamp ThingAnd we are the witnesses of this narrative shift in the pages of “All Flesh is Grass” (published in Swamp Thing # 61, June 1987), a deeply touching story about a planet of creatures that are very similar to Swamp Thing. In this world, every tree, every plant and every flower is a sentient being, an intelligent creature, with a soul and a conscience, if you will. And the monster from Louisiana’s swamps is not ready for something like that. He clashes onto them, he crushes them, he absorbs thousands of individuals into one gigantic body, and with countless voices inside his mind, he finds it impossible to rest or to be at peace. It’s only thanks to the intervention of Medphyl, the Green Lantern of that galactic sector, that Swamp Thing learns to control his vibrational frequency and releases, or rather expulses, the bodies that had been subsumed: “Medphyl hauls upon a dozen lines, reeling in each reclaimed soul as green photon fingers untangle it from the mesmerized central mass”. The ending, however, is extremely moving and very intense. Because in just one issue Moore addresses complex subjects like the collectivity, the strange customs of an alien civilization, the way proximity can nurture love but also suffocate it and last, but not least, the loss of the ones we love, the death, the hurried departure of our fathers or mentors that leave us always devastated, always with one last conversation that it’s owed to us, and that it will never take place, because death takes it all away from us. “Wavelength” (Swamp Thing # 62, July 1987) was written by Rick Veitch, and it’s truly an extraordinary chapter. Seems to me that after working with Moore, Bissette and Veitch found in themselves their inner voices, their essence as writers, and they both exceled at it. Veitch pays homage to “El Aleph” a short story written by the legendary Jorge Luis Borges. But Veitch also combines the erudition of a highly intellectualized plot with the irresistible charm of DC’s vast heritage. Hence, the apparition of Metron and his Mobius Chair, the undecipherable mysteries of the Source, the encounter between the New God and the Swamp Thing, the vexing nature of the Aleph and the cruel and cold demeanor of Darkseid, of Apokolips, god of darkness, and the only one interested in the Anti-Life Equation. A remarkable issue that proved that Veitch could replace Moore as the writer of Swamp Thing, which eventually did happen.   Swamp Thing & Metron And that is quite logical if you spend a few minutes thinking about it. In his introduction, Stephen Bissette explains how important it was for Alan Moore and Rick Veitch to team up: “Together they explored the science fantasy and mythic potential of both Swamp Thing and the DC Universe with the same insight and energy that the earlier ‘American Gothic’ had brought to the horror genre”. Now that the Odyssey is over, the hero must return home. And that’s what happens in “Loose Ends (Reprise)” (Swamp Thing # 63, August 1987). While Swamp Thing exterminates the men responsible for severing his link to Earth, the rest of the cast gathers and coalesces under a new light: Abigail visits his husband, Matt Cable, a man in comma, a true ‘vegetable’, Chester Williams, Liz Tremayne and Wallace Monroe decide to put all their time and effort into an ecological movement. After 3 years and with more than 40 issues, Alan Moore was finally saying goodbye to the title that had made him famous in the United States. “Return of the Good Gumbo” (Swamp Thing # 64, September 1987) is the final chapter but it’s also an extraordinary example of how a series must come to an end. Swamp Thing and Abby are finally reunited, and they decide to leave behind all the craziness, all the supernatural aspects of their past, and to simply live together, like husband and wife. The ending is heartbreaking at moments, but at the same time it has humor and a sense of humanity that turn these pages into something genuinely unforgettable.We should admire Moore’s run even more if we take into account the enormous pressure he was handling during those days. He was working 24/7, writing without a pause, and creating one masterpiece after another. In 1987 he was simultaneously writing Miracleman, Watchmen and Swamp Thing, like Bissette explains: “there was an enormous burden upon Alan’s shoulders […] and the pressure not only to deliver but also to live up to the high expectations”. Nevertheless, and against all odds, Moore created one of the most fascinating ongoing series that has ever graced the comic book industry panorama. Personally, it has taken me 2 years (from August 2012 to August 2014) to review the entire run. And it has been a task that has filled me with joy. Now I leave it all to you; read it at your leisure:Saga of the Swamp Thing # 20 & 21 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/08/saga-of-swamp-thing-20-21-alan-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 22, 23 & 24 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/08/saga-of-swamp-thing-22-23-24-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 25, 26 & 27 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/08/saga-of-swamp-thing-25-26-27-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 28, 29 & 30 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/12/saga-of-swamp-thing-28-29-30-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 31 & Annual # 2http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/12/saga-of-swamp-thing-31-annual-2-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 32, 33 & 34 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/12/saga-of-swamp-thing-32-33-34-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 35, 36 & 37http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/02/saga-of-swamp-thing-35-36-37-moore.htmlSwamp Thing # 38 & 39 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/02/swamp-thing-38-39-moore-woch-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 40, 41 & 42http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/02/swamp-thing-40-41-42-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 43, 44 & 45 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/08/swamp-thing-43-44-45-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 46, 47 & 48 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/09/swamp-thing-46-47-48-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 49 & 50 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/09/swamp-thing-49-50-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 51 & 52 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/01/swamp-thing-51-52-moore-veitch-alcala.htmlSwamp Thing # 53http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/01/swamp-thing-53-alan-moore-john-totleben.htmlSwamp Thing # 54, 55 & 56 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/01/swamp-thing-54-55-56-moore-veitch-alcala.html Swamp Thing # 57, 58, 59 & 60http://www.artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/swamp-thing-57-58-59-60-moore-veitch.html________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ “Swamp Thing” de Alan Moore, como toda obra maestra, estaba en constante evolución. Empezó como un título de terror, luego comenzó a combinar “suspenso sofisticado” con fantasía, pero en los números finales el cambio hacia la ciencia ficción era más que evidente. De hecho, la habilidad de Alan Moore para rescatar viejos héroes de DC de la Edad de Plata y convertirlos en personajes fascinantes fue un éxito sin precedentes.  Swamp Thing & AbbyY nosotros somos los testigos de este giro narrativo en las páginas de “Toda la carne es césped” (publicado en "Swamp Thing" # 61, junio de 1987), una historia profundamente enternecedora sobre un planeta de criaturas que son muy similares a la Cosa del Pantano. En este mundo, cada árbol, cada planta y cada flor es un ser conciente, una criatura inteligente, con alma propia.Y el monstruo de los pantanos de Luisiana no está preparado para algo así. Él se choca con ellos, los aplasta, absorbe a miles de individuos en un cuerpo gigantesco, y con incontables voces dentro de su mente, le resulta imposible descansar o encontrar paz. Es sólo gracias a la intervención de Medphyl, el Green Lantern de ese sector galáctico, que la Cosa del Pantano aprende a controlar su frecuencia vibracional y suelta, o más bien expulsa, los cuerpos que han sido subsumidos: “Medphyl lanza por encima una docena de cuerdas, jalando en cada una un alma reclamada mientras que dedos de fotón verde las desenredan de la hipnotizada masa central”. El final, sin embargo, es extremadamente conmovedor y muy intenso. Porque en tan sólo un número, Moore desarrolla temas complejos como la colectividad, las extrañas costumbres de una civilización alienígena, la forma en que la proximidad puede nutrir el amor pero también sofocarlo y, por último, la pérdida de aquellos a quienes amamos, la muerte, la apresurada partida de nuestros padres o mentores que nos deja siempre devastados, siempre con la deuda de una última conversación, que ya nunca ocurrirá, porque la muerte nos arrebata todo.“Frecuencia de onda” ("Swamp Thing" # 62, julio de 1987) fue escrito por Rick Veitch, y es verdaderamente un capítulo extraordinario. Me parece que después de trabajar con Moore, Bissette y Veitch encontraron su voz interior, su esencia como escritores, y ambos lograron algo brillante. Veitch rinde homenaje a “El Aleph”, un cuento escrito por el legendario Jorge Luis Borges. Pero Veitch también combina la erudición de un argumento de alto vuelo intelectual con el irresistible encanto de la vasta herencia de DC. Allí aparecerán Metron y su Silla Mobius, los misterios indescifrables de la Fuente, el encuentro entre el Nuevo Dios y la Cosa del Pantano, la perpleja naturaleza del Aleph y la expresión cruel y fría de Darkseid, de Apokolips, dios de la oscuridad, y el único interesado en la Ecuación de la Anti-Vida. Un extraordinario número que demostró que Veitch podía reemplazar a Moore como el escritor de la colección, algo que eventualmente sucedería. The end / FinY esto es bastante lógico si lo analizamos por un momento. En su introducción, Stephen Bissette explica lo importante que fue para Alan Moore y Rick Veitch trabajar en equipo: “Juntos exploraron la fantasía de la ciencia y el potencial mítico tanto de la Cosa del Pantano como del Universo DC con la misma visión y energía que la anterior ‘American Gothic’ había traído al género de terror”. Al final de la Odisea, el héroe debe retornar a su hogar. Y eso es lo que pasa en “Cabos sueltos (Repetición)” ("Swamp Thing" # 63, agosto de 1987). Mientras la Cosa del Pantano extermina a los hombres responsables de cercenar su vínculo con la Tierra, el resto del elenco se reúne y se redefine bajo una nueva luz: Abigail visita a su esposo, Matt Cable, un hombre en coma, un verdadero ‘vegetal’; Chester Williams, Liz Tremayne y Wallace Monroe deciden enfocar todo su tiempo y esfuerzo en un movimiento ecológico. Después de 3 años y con más de 40 números, Alan Moore finalmente le decía adiós al título que lo había hecho famoso en los Estados Unidos. “Retorno del buen Gumbo” ("Swamp Thing" # 64, setiembre de 1987) es el capítulo final pero también es un extraordinario ejemplo de cómo darle fin a una serie. La Cosa del Pantano y Abby por fin se reúnen, y deciden dejar atrás toda la locura, todos los aspectos sobrenaturales de su pasado, para simplemente vivir juntos, como marido y mujer. El final es conmovedor por momentos, pero al mismo tiempo tiene humor y un sentido de humanidad que convierten estas páginas en algo genuinamente inolvidable. Deberíamos admirar la etapa de Moore aún más si tenemos en cuenta la enorme presión que experimentaba en aquellos días. Él estaba trabajando las 24 horas del día, escribiendo sin pausa, y creando una obra maestra tras otra. En 1987 estaba escribiendo simultáneamente "Miracleman", "Watchmen" y "Swamp Thing", como explica Bissette: “había un enorme peso sobre los hombros de Alan […] y la presión no solamente de las entregas sino también de estar a la altura de las expectativas”. No obstante, y contra todo pronóstico, Moore creó una de las colecciones mensuales más fascinantes que han agraciado el panorama de la industria del comic book.Personalmente, he tardado 2 años (desde agosto de 2012 hasta agosto de 2014) para reseñar toda la etapa. Y ha sido una tarea que me ha llenado de goce. Ahora, dejo todo en vuestras manos, para que lo leáis a vuestro antojo. Saga of the Swamp Thing # 20 & 21 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/08/saga-of-swamp-thing-20-21-alan-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 22, 23 & 24 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/08/saga-of-swamp-thing-22-23-24-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 25, 26 & 27 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/08/saga-of-swamp-thing-25-26-27-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 28, 29 & 30 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/12/saga-of-swamp-thing-28-29-30-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 31 & Annual # 2http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/12/saga-of-swamp-thing-31-annual-2-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 32, 33 & 34 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/12/saga-of-swamp-thing-32-33-34-moore.htmlSaga of the Swamp Thing # 35, 36 & 37http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/02/saga-of-swamp-thing-35-36-37-moore.htmlSwamp Thing # 38 & 39 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/02/swamp-thing-38-39-moore-woch-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 40, 41 & 42http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/02/swamp-thing-40-41-42-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 43, 44 & 45 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/08/swamp-thing-43-44-45-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 46, 47 & 48 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/09/swamp-thing-46-47-48-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 49 & 50 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/09/swamp-thing-49-50-moore-bissette.htmlSwamp Thing # 51 & 52 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/01/swamp-thing-51-52-moore-veitch-alcala.htmlSwamp Thing # 53http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/01/swamp-thing-53-alan-moore-john-totleben.htmlSwamp Thing # 54, 55 & 56 http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/01/swamp-thing-54-55-56-moore-veitch-alcala.html Swamp Thing # 57, 58, 59 & 60http://www.artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/swamp-thing-57-58-59-60-moore-veitch.htmlOriginally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/08/swamp-thing-61-62-63-64-moore-veitch.html

Planetary # 4 - Warren Ellis John Cassaday

Planetary # 4 - Warren Ellis John Cassaday

By Arion in Blog on July 27, 2014

So far the Archeologists of the Impossible have been dealing with the secrets of the 20th century, but this time, amidst the rubbles of a destroyed office building, they find something else, something unique, something older than humanity itself.Buried below the foundations of an unassuming building, the Planetary team discovers a spaceship, a gigantic structure slightly reminiscent to a cathedral. However, even with the assistance of dozens of scientists and researchers, they cannot gain access to this mysterious vessel.Then an accident happens. Jim, a man who was not supposed to be there, stumbles onto the hull of the ship and creates a dimensional rift. Suddenly, he is trapped inside. And what he sees is something that defies his imagination.Warren Ellis presents to us the idea of an intelligent spaceship, one with a conscious; a veritable life form with circuits instead of veins, navigation systems instead of synapsis and organic fuel instead of blood. But it has been designed to be piloted by complex minds, and since its crew died eons ago, the ship has remained dormant, forever entombed in an alien world: Earth.The ship collided against our planet not thousands but millions of years ago, when the dinosaurs still reigned supreme upon the continent later known as America. For millions of years, the vessel has been waiting to be rescued, and now Jim can be its pilot. Jim steps onto the hull / Jim pisa el cascoFor the first time since the beginning of the series, Elijah Snow comes to a logical conclusion. Planetary can no longer be a passive organization, they can't simply excavate otherworldly relics from the past, they need to step up their game and be as proactive as they can be. And so he decides to help Jim, who is now the pilot of an alien transportation system.John Cassaday’s art in this issue is absolutely exquisite. A clean design and inspired lettering are combined in a cover reminiscent of old magazines; there, Jim reminds us of Captain Marvel (both in attire and posturing). The page that shows Jim stepping onto the ship’s hull is an amazing exercise of perspective. On the first panel, we get to see the entire scene diagonally and from above; and in panels 2 and 3 the camera descends progressively. In the next page, architecture shines through, Cassaday’s astonishing imagination is unleashed in this collection of Corinthian columns, art deco pillars, Renaissance vault ceilings and cathedral stained glass windows. I can only think of two artists that have impressed me so much with architecture: Cassaday and Barry Windsor-Smith. Finally, the collision of the celestial cathedral in the Jurassic period is spectacular, and the tour around the ship that Jim shares with Elijah Snow, Jakita Wagner and Drummer is outstanding.  Inside the celestial cathedral / dentro de la catedral celestial________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Collision during the Jurassic period / colisión durante el periodo jurásicoHasta ahora los Arqueólogos de lo Imposible han estado lidiando con los secretos del siglo XX, pero esta vez, entre los restos de un edificio de oficinas destruido, encuentran algo más, algo único, algo más antiguo que la humanidad. Enterrado debajo de los cimientos de un modesto edificio, el equipo de Planetary descubre una nave, una gigantesca estructura ligeramente reminiscente a una catedral. Sin embargo, incluso con la ayuda de docenas de científicos e investigadores, no pueden acceder a este misterioso bajel. Es entonces cuando ocurre un accidente. Jim, un hombre que no debería haber estado allí, se topa con el casco de la nave y crea una fisura dimensional. Repentinamente, está atrapado en el interior. Y lo que ve desafía su imaginación.Warren Ellis nos presenta la idea de una nave inteligente, con conciencia; una verdadera forma de vida con circuitos en vez de venas, sistemas de navegación en vez de sinapsis y combustible orgánico en vez de sangre. Pero ha sido diseñada para ser piloteada por mentes complejas, y como la tripulación murió hace eones, la nave ha permanecido dormida, para siempre enclaustrada en un mundo alienígeno: la Tierra. La nave chocó con nuestro planeta no hace miles sino millones de años, cuando los dinosaurios aún reinaban supremos en el continente que después sería conocido como América. Por millones de años, el bajel ha estado esperando a ser rescatado, y ahora Jim puede ser su piloto. Jim, Elijah Snow, Jakita Wagner & DrummerPor primera vez desde el inicio de la serie, Elijah Snow llega a una conclusión lógica. Planetary ya no puede ser una organización pasiva, no pueden simplemente excavar las reliquias de un pasado que no pertenece a nuestro mundo, necesitan mejorar y ser mucho más proactivos. Así que él decide ayudar a Jim, quien ahora es el piloto de un sistema de transporte alienígeno. En este número, el arte de John Cassaday es absolutamente exquisito. Un diseño limpio y un inspirado rotulado se combinan en una portada reminiscente de las viejas revistas; allí, Jim nos recuerda a Captain Marvel (tanto en el traje como en la postura). La página que muestra a Jim pisando el casco de la nave es un asombroso ejercicio de perspectiva. En la primera viñeta, vemos toda la escena diagonalmente y desde arriba; y en las viñetas 2 y 3, la cámara desciende progresivamente. En la página siguiente, la arquitectura brilla, la asombrosa imaginación de Cassaday se desata en esta colección de columnas corintias, pilares art deco, bóvedas del Renacimiento y vitrales de catedral. Sólo puedo pensar en dos artistas que me han impresionado tanto con la arquitectura: Cassaday y Barry Windsor-Smith. Finalmente, la colisión de la catedral celestial en el periodo  jurásico es espectacular, y el paseo por la nave que Jim comparte con Elijah Snow, Jakita Wagner y Drummer es sobresaliente.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/planetary-4-warren-ellis-john-cassaday.html

Swamp Thing # 57, 58, 59 60 - Moore, Veitch Totleben

Swamp Thing # 57, 58, 59 60 - Moore, Veitch Totleben

By Arion in Blog on July 22, 2014

Sometimes it’s quite difficult for me to imagine how DC Comics survived. As most of you might know, DC went through a rough patch in the 80s, the so-called “implosion”, instead of launching new titles each month they had to cancel them due to low sales and the readership’s absence. Adam Strange attacks Swamp Thing / Adam Strange ataca a la Cosa del PantanoAnd I say it is hard to envision such moment because DC, just like Marvel, has a rich legacy of heroes and characters that defy our imagination. The problem, as usual, comes from shortsighted editors, from censorship and from lack of innovation. In other words, a fruitful land had become a barren and deserted wasteland.And that is exactly what we can observe in “Mysteries in Space” (published in Swamp Thing # 57, February 1987). Swamp Thing arrives to Rann, a planet plagued by famine, by the extinction of vegetation and all life forms, not only the world is sterile but also the people who live in it. This is why, years ago, earthman Adam Strange was regarded as a hero and as the savior of this alien civilization. Adam Strange naively thought that his contribution was limited to wearing a jet pack and shooting down monsters with his laser gun. He was wrong. His first and foremost duty was to impregnate princess Alanna, in order to give millions hope. Because if only one child was to be born, then all the people of Rann would understand that the situation wasn’t so desperate.Adam Strange was the kind of hero that I never considered exciting. And he wasn’t interesting because most writers would only see him as the classic sci-fi hero that could solve the galaxy’s problems with laser rays. Alan Moore proves that the gaudy costume and accessories were only that, an ancillary aspect of this unassuming champion. The betrayal of Thanagar / la traición de ThanagarIn “Exiles” (Swamp Thing # 58, March 1987), an amazing parallelism takes place between Rann and Alanna, heir of the throne. Authorized by Sardath, the most respected scientist, Swamp Thing decides to get in touch with this strange planet, and while doing that he resuscitates biological life forms; he turns dusty deserts into lush forests. Even though, in the process, Swamp Thing and Adam Strange must fight to the death with their former allies: two agents from Thanagar, home planet of Hawkman and Hawkwoman from the Justice League of America. Rann is made fertile again and Alanna discovers that she is at last pregnant: “She’ll return to her chambers through spotless, childless palace halls, maybe considering what to tell our offspring, if it should ask, about its father, so far away… who visits only sometimes”. And, in a way, DC learns how important it is to let the garden grow free of editorial intervention or censorship. And thus one of the most fruitful eras for DC is consolidated in this two-part story.Parental issues are still present in the following two issues. Certainly, in “Reunion” (Swamp Thing # 59, April 1987), Abigail must deal with old men and women in a retirement home; she feels compassion towards them but at the same time she feels scared, scared of death, scared of the impending disappearance of her own father. It’s only at the end of this chapter, when she finds the putrefied remnants of his progenitor that she understands her fear. “Reunion” was written by Stephen Bissette, who proves to be not only an amazing artist but also a wonderful and very gifted storyteller.Finally, “Loving the Alien” is the strangest love story I’ve read. Swamp Thing lands in a living spaceship, a spaceship bigger than a planetoid, with enough life and energy to sustain countless species. This entity doesn’t want to die alone, it wants children, and it seems only a creature like Swamp Thing can survive the brutal mating process. Alan Moore creates a story that truly feels like something out of this world. And the extraordinary art comes from John Totleben, his visual experimentation and unconventional graphics are the fundamental key of this episode.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ A veces es bastante difícil imaginar cómo DC Comics logró sobrevivir. Como muchos de ustedes sabrán, DC pasó por una etapa difícil en los 80, la denominada “implosión”, en vez de lanzar títulos nuevos cada mes, tuvieron que cancelarlos a causa de las bajas ventas y la ausencia de lectoría. Abigail and her father / Abigail y su padreY digo que es difícil visualizar semejante momento porque DC, al igual que Marvel, tiene un rico legado de héroes y personajes que desafían nuestra imaginación. El problema, como siempre, viene de editores cegatones, de la censura y de la falta de innovación. En otras palabras, una tierra fructífera se había convertido en un terreno baldío y desértico. Y eso es exactamente lo que podemos observar en “Misterios en el espacio” (publicado en "Swamp Thing" # 57, febrero de 1987). La Cosa del Pantano llega a Rann, un planeta plagado por la hambruna, por la extinción de la vegetación y todas las formas de vida, no sólo el mundo es estéril sino también la gente que vive en él. Es por ello que, hace años, el terrícola Adam Strange fue glorificado como un héroe y como el salvador de esta civilización alienígena. Adam Strange pensaba inocentemente que su contribución se limitaba a usar una mochila propulsora y a disparar monstruos con su pistola láser. Él estaba equivocado. Su primer y más importante deber era embarazar a la princesa Alanna, para así darle esperanza a millones. Porque si tan sólo un niño llegase a nacer, entonces toda la gente de Rann entendería que la situación no era tan desesperada. Adam Strange era el tipo de héroe que nunca me pareció interesante. Y no era lo era porque la mayoría de escritores sólo lo veían como el clásico héroe de ciencia ficción que podía resolver los problemas de la galaxia con rayos laser. Alan Moore demuestra que su vistoso traje y sus accesorios con sólo eso, un aspecto secundario de este modesto campeón.  Inside the alien spaceship / al interior de la nave alienígenaEn “Exilios” ("Swamp Thing" # 58, marzo de 1987), hay un asombroso paralelo entre Rann y Alanna, heredera del trono. Con la autorización de Sardath, el científico más respetado, la Cosa del Pantano decide entrar en contacto con este extraño planeta, y mientras lo hace resucita las formas de vida biológicas; convierte un desierto polvoriento en bosques tropicales. Aunque, en el proceso, la Cosa del Pantano y Adam Strange deben pelear hasta la muerte con sus antiguos aliados: dos agentes de Thanagar, mundo hogar de Hawkman y Hawkwoman de la Liga de la Justicia de América. Rann es fértil de nuevo y Alanna descubre que por fin está embarazada: “Ella regresará a su recámara, a través de pasillos sin manchas, sin niños, quizás considerando qué debería decirle a sus hijos, si acaso llegasen a preguntarle, sobre su padre, que está tan lejos... que sólo los visita de vez en cuando”. Y, en cierto modo, DC aprende lo importante que es dejar que el jardín crezca libre de intervención editorial o censura. Y por lo tanto una de las eras más fructíferas de DC se consolida en esta historia de dos partes.El tema paterno sigue estando presente en los dos números siguientes. Ciertamente, en “Reunión” ("Swamp Thing" # 59, abril de 1987), Abigail debe lidiar con ancianos en un asilo; ella siente compasión por ellos pero al mismo tiempo se siente asustada, le teme a la muerte, le tema a la pronta desaparición de su propio padre. Es sólo al final de este capítulo, cuando encuentra los restos putrefactos de su progenitor que ella entiende ese miedo. “Reunión” fue escrita por Stephen Bissette, quien prueba ser no sólo un asombroso artista sino también un narrador maravilloso y lleno de talento.Finalmente, “Amando al alien” es la historia de amor más extraña que he leído. La Cosa del Pantano aterriza en una nave viviente, una nave más grande que un planetoide, con suficiente vida y energía para nutrir a incontables especies. Esta entidad no quiere morir en soledad, quiere hijos. Y parece que solamente una criatura como la Cosa del Pantano puede sobrevivir al brutal proceso de apareamiento. Alan Moore crea una historia que se siente de veras como algo fuera de nuestro mundo. Y el extraordinario arte es de John Totleben, su experimentación visual y sus gráficos poco convencionales son la clave fundamental de este episodio.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/swamp-thing-57-58-59-60-moore-veitch.html

Review: The Goon Volume 3 Heaps of Ruination

Review: The Goon Volume 3 Heaps of Ruination

By Rui Esteves in Blog on July 20, 2014

CoverHeaps of Ruination brings us giant ape Goon, The Buzzard, Lagarto, sexy vampire lady, Frankie knifing something in the eye, Hellboy and more.This volume is a strange, but engaging, compilations of stories. They range from an awkwardly silly 2 page short about a simpleton crapping his pants to old school sci-fi monsters fighting Godzilla style to tormented soul and bleeding heart drama.Apart from the return of The Buzzard, this volume doesn't advance the story of the Goon, nor does it give you any further insight into its characters. What it does bring is an entertaining group of stories. My favorite is the Hellboy crossover.I love crossovers that tell a good story and manage to respect the spirit of the characters involved. Eric Powell wrote one of those crossovers. Hellboys keeps all his moodiness and badassery while Frankie remains an obnoxious little prick that just wants to stab people in the eye.There is some somewhat smart humor and some very cheap shots. But in the end its a fun and funny book. You might feel a bit guilty after laughing at some of Powell's twisted jokes, bit it will be worth it. Getting a message across In sum, good book that introduces a few secondary characters, sees the return of others and a kickass crossover.Publisher: Dark HorseYear: 2011Pages: 128Authors: Eric PowellISBN: 1595826254Follow Reading Graphic Novels on Facebook and Twitter. Originally Published at Reading Graphic Novels http://readinggraphicnovels.blogspot.com/2014/07/review-goon-volume-3-heaps-of-ruination.html

Silver Surfer # 1, 2 3 - Dan Slott Mike Allred

Silver Surfer # 1, 2 3 - Dan Slott Mike Allred

By Arion in Blog on July 16, 2014

When Stan Lee and Jack Kirby introduced Silver Surfer to the public in the pages of Fantastic Four, he was the herald of Galactus, an obedient servant that would find worlds so that his master could devour them thus placating his endless hunger.But immediately after his memorable first appearance, Silver Surfer became something else, something harder to define. He was a rebel who would fight against Galactus in order to save Earth, but he was also a melancholic outcast, a misunderstood loner, an unwilling hero with enough inner doubts to compete against Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Dan Slott recovers the cosmic grandeur present in the origin of the character and grounds it with the incorporation of Dawn, an ordinary girl from Earth that suddenly turns into “The Most Important Person in the Universe” (coincidentally, the title of the inaugural chapter).“Everything and All at Once” describes Dawn’s adventures, as she manages to free herself from her alien captors and has enough courage and charisma to lead a revolt against the Incredulous Zed and his powerful army. But it’s only in the third chapter, titled “Change of Heart”, when we get to admire the full scope of Slott’s ambitious tale. For me, the moments shared between the Never Queen and Eternity are priceless. They are also a magnificent homage to Marvel’s cosmic past.Of course, as you may have imagined, I didn’t buy this title only because of Dan Slott. I should say, in fact, that I bought it because of Michael Allred and Laura Allred, one of my favorite artistic teams. Last year they graced the pages of FF (as a matter of fact, in FF # 16, they portrayed a vibrant and very likeable Silver Surfer, perhaps a prophecy of what was yet to come).With only a few issues, I’ve already read a lot of positive comments about this new Silver Surfer series. I would say it is by far the best treatment of Galactus’s herald that I’ve seen in decades. And it is all thanks to the great creative team formed by Dan Slott and Mike Allred.For the past few years, Slott has been comfortably entrenched in the gulfs of the Spider-Man universe, but once upon a time he was a new writer, someone completely unknown, someone eager to tell stories about the human –and the superhuman– condition. When I read his first issues in She-Hulk I knew I had found someone special, an author with a refreshing perspective and an impeccable sense of humor. And all of that is rescued in the pages of Silver Surfer. Because Slott does succeed in combining the cosmic threats and larger-than-life heroes with clever jokes, sharing always the sensibilities of Russell T. Davies (creator of famous British series like “Queer as Folk”), the man responsible for the current success of “Doctor Who” (in fact, Slott publicly acknowledges his creative debt with Mr. Davies). Even Silver Surfer’s sense of grandeur, the impossible odds and the extraterrestrial threats, seem to keep the same jovial spirit of a legendary TV series like “Doctor Who”.So do I recommend Silver Surfer? Yes, by all means!   Silver Surfer using his cosmic powers / Silver Surfer usando sus poderes cósmicos________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ DawnCuando Stan Lee y Jack Kirby presentaron a Silver Surfer en las páginas de los Cuatro Fantásticos, él era el heraldo de  Galactus, un sirviente obediente que encontraba mundos para que su amo pudiese devorarlos y, así, aplacar su hambre infinita.Pero inmediatamente después de su memorable primera aparición, Silver Surfer se convirtió en algo más, algo difícil de definir. Fue un rebelde que peleó contra Galactus para salvar la Tierra, pero también fue un marginado melancólico, un solitario incomprendido, un héroe por obligación con suficientes dudas internas para competir con el Hamlet de Shakespeare. Dan Slott recupera la grandeza cósmica presente en el origen del personaje y la asienta en tierra firme con la incorporación de Dawn, una chica ordinaria de la Tierra que repentinamente se convierte en “La persona más importante del universo” (no es coincidencia que ese sea el título del capítulo inaugural).“Todos y todo a la vez” describe las aventuras de Dawn, quien se las arregla para liberarse de sus captores alienígenos y tiene suficiente valentía y carisma para liderar una revolución en contra de Zed, el Incrédulo y su poderosa armada. Pero es sólo en el tercer capítulo, titulado “Cambio de corazón”, cuando podemos admirar el verdadero alcance del ambicioso relato de Slott. Para mí, los momentos compartidos entre la Reina Nunca y Eternidad son invalorables. También son un magnífico homenaje al pasado cósmico de Marvel. Never Queen's heart / el corazón de la Reina NuncaDesde luego, como pueden haber imaginado, no compré este título sólo por Dan Slott. Debería decir, de hecho, que lo compré por Michael Allred y Laura Allred, uno de mis equipos artísticos favoritos. El año pasado agraciaron las páginas de "FF" (de hecho, en el FF # 16, retrataron a un Silver Surfer vibrante y muy simpático, tal vez una profecía de lo que estaba por venir).Con pocos números, ya he leído muchos comentarios positivos sobre esta nueva colección de Silver Surfer. Yo diría que es de lejos el mejor tratamiento del heraldo de Galactus que he visto en décadas. Y es todo gracias al gran equipo creativo formado por Dan Slott y Mike Allred.En años recientes, Slott se había atrincherado cómodamente en las cavidades del universo de "Spider-Man", pero hace mucho tiempo él fue un escritor nuevo, alguien completamente desconocido, alguien impaciente por contar historias sobre la condición humana –y la superhumana. Cuando leí sus primeros números en "She-Hulk" supe que había encontrado a alguien especial, a un autor con una perspectiva refrescante y un impecable sentido del humor. Y todo ello es rescatado en las páginas de "Silver Surfer".  Never Queen & EternityY es que Slott tiene éxito al combinar las amenazas cósmicas y los héroes legendarios con bromas astutas, compartiendo siempre las sensibilidades de Russell T. Davies (creador de famosas series británicas como “Queer as Folk”), el hombre responsable por el éxito actual de “Doctor Who” (de hecho, Slott admite públicamente su deuda creativa con el señor Davies). Incluso el sentido de grandeza de Silver Surfer, los retos imposibles y las amenazas extraterrestres, parecen conservar el mismo espíritu jovial de una serie de televisión tan legendaria como “Doctor Who”. Silver Surfer & DawnAsí que, ¿les recomiendo Silver Surfer? ¡Claro que sí! Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/silver-surfer-1-2-3-dan-slott-mike.html

El viaje - Mónica Cuba (Galería Yvonne Sanguineti)

El viaje - Mónica Cuba (Galería Yvonne Sanguineti)

By Arion in Blog on July 13, 2014

Faithful to my promise, I’m including the new restored pages of Miracleman #5 You can find my original review here:http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2013/01/miracleman-5-alan-moore-alan-davis.html Now that I am rereading Miracleman I’m enjoying the stories even more than the first time…  The past of Doctor Gargunza is fascinating, he’s more than a villain, he’s one of the richest characters of Moore’s Miracleman, perhaps rivaled only by Evelyn Cream. This is why Marvel’s sixth issue (which coincides with Eclipse’s Miracleman #5) is probably one of my favorites. The horror of the past is summoned by Doctor Gargunza, and like defenseless spectators we have no other option but to continue to gaze upon his dark secrets. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________El 2010 solía ir a la Galería Yvonne Sanguineti  todos los meses. Y cuando se inauguró la muestra “El viaje” de Mónica Cuba, en noviembre, yo estuve presente. http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2010/11/two-2.html El otoñoEn ese entonces no conocía a Mónica pero sus cuadros y sus objetos artísticamente intervenidos suscitaron en mí una extraña emoción. Había algo valioso en ellos, algo que iba mucho más allá de la materialidad de, por ejemplo, una maleta, algo maravilloso que la artista lograba transmitir al público.4 años después, la Galería Yvonne Sanguineti volvió a convocar a Mónica Cuba. El resultado: “Mujer corazón de papel”, una muestra extraordinaria que es el testimonio irrefutable de la evolución artística de Mónica. A pasos agigantados, en estos últimos cuatro años, Mónica ha consolidado su visión, ha perfeccionado su técnica y ha pintado cuadros absolutamente impresionantes. Mis dos obras favoritas se complementan mutuamente, no sólo por la temática sino también por el tratamiento cromático, por la calidez y frialdad contrastante que se desprende de ellos. Me refiero a “El otoño” y a “De espaldas a ti”, un cuadro inolvidable, de una intensidad sobrecogedora, que me acompañará en el recuerdo de aquí a 4, 10 o 30 años más. De espaldas a tiLa muestra seguirá abierta al público hasta el día 19 de julio. La dirección es avenida Grau 810 Barranco. Están todos cordialmente invitados a darse una vuelta por ahí y a admirar tanto buen arte.Arcadio B.Originally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/el-viaje-monica-cuba-galeria-yvonne.html

Miracleman Book 1: A Dream of Flying

Miracleman Book 1: A Dream of Flying

By Arion in Blog on July 9, 2014

In Miracleman Book 1: A Dream of Flying, Marvel collects issues 1 through 5 of the famed series. Marvel, of course, has included a substantial amount of material that I have yet to review (as most of it didn’t appear on the original Eclipse editions that I own). Nevertheless, with the fifth issue I can safely assume that I have reviewed Miracleman Book 1, if not in its entirety at least in its most essential and fundamental aspects.  Marvel’s edition of Miracleman #5 actually coincides with Eclipse’s Miracleman #4 In the Eclipse edition, the Red King Syndrome story was absurdly divided in 2 issues. Marvel, however, had the good idea of presenting them together in the same chapter. To get a better understanding of this first volume I ask you to please check the following links:Miracleman #1http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-1-alan-moore-garry-leach.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/03/gabinete-de-dibujos-galeria-pepe-cobo.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/03/exposicion-de-arte-abstracto-iosu.htmlMiracleman #2http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-2-alan-moore-garry-leach.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/04/mamamia-dedalo.htmlMiracleman #3http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-3-alan-moore-alan-davis.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/the-annotated-miracleman.htmlMiracleman #4http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-4-alan-moore-alan-davis.html________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________En Miracleman Book 1: A Dream of Flying, Marvel reúne los números 1 al 5 de la afamada serie. Marvel, por supuesto, ha incluido una cantidad sustancial de material que aún no he reseñado (la mayor parte no aparecía en las ediciones originales de Eclipse que están en mis manos). No obstante, con el quinto número seguramente puedo asumir que he reseñado el Libro 1 de Miracleman, tal vez no entero pero sí en sus aspectos más esenciales y fundamentales. La edición de Marvel de Miracleman #5 de hecho coincide con el Miracleman #4 de Eclipse. En la edición de Eclipse, el Síndrome del Rey Rojo se divide absurdamente en 2 ejemplares. Marvel, sin embargo, tuvo la buena idea de presentarlos juntos en un mismo capítulo.  Para entender mejor este primer volumen les pido que por favor revisen los siguientes links:Miracleman #1http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-1-alan-moore-garry-leach.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/03/gabinete-de-dibujos-galeria-pepe-cobo.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/03/exposicion-de-arte-abstracto-iosu.htmlMiracleman #2http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-2-alan-moore-garry-leach.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/04/mamamia-dedalo.htmlMiracleman #3http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-3-alan-moore-alan-davis.htmlhttp://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/the-annotated-miracleman.htmlMiracleman #4http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2012/01/miracleman-4-alan-moore-alan-davis.htmlOriginally Published at http://artbyarion.blogspot.com/2014/07/miracleman-book-1-dream-of-flying.html

The Outhouse is not responsible for any butthurt incurred by reading this website. All original content copyright the author. Banner by Ali Jaffery - he's available for commission!