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Angry Citizens: First Date, Pt.4 "A Game of Clue, Who The Hell Are You?!"

{hide_in_full_view}Angry Citizens: First Date, Pt.4

We're back and with a special interview with Angry Citizens co-creator Christopher Rice on his "first tango" with artist Joshua Cassara!

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31 Days of Halloween

Strick around after the page to read how artist turned writer Christopher Rice first met artist Joshua Cassara!

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Now our interview with Christopher Rice about Angry Citizens artist Joshua Cassara, their first meet, the work past and present.

J.M.: How did you and Josh meet? What is the origin of your species, so to speak?

CR: I was his boss. I was a restaurant manager and he was a server. I had stopped drawing to get a "real" job and support my family. He was earning money. We started talking art and comics and he convinced me to draw again.

J.M.: How did he convince you? Was it his interest in art and comics or was it his work he showed you?

CR: He was in college studying art. He would show me his projects. But I had tons of previous work to show him. So we brought our stuff to work and get feedback. I convinced myself. He just put things I love in front of me and I didn't feel like I was alone in the world.

J.M.: Since Josh is a bit of a recluse when it comes to interviews, I'd say he's more of a doer than talker. What was his work like back then?

CR: Crap. Utter crap. No no just kidding. He has always had a lifelike raw quality to his work. He really is very natural. To me, it looks like he feels his way around the page. The rendering is impressive

J.M.: I can respect that, even dig it. I've been known to fumble my way around a page or two. So what is it like then when you compare his work approach back then to yours? Were you similar in execution or completely on different hemispheres?

CR: We are completely in the way we hit a page. Me, I plan out the page in little thumbnails and sketch the crap out of everything and he used to be put it on the page and go where it feels right. We both kind of came closer to each other

J.M.: Do you mean back then or now? What's the process now between you two?

CR: I still plan but right the page before everything is concrete and he has become more structural, and his backgrounds are exceptional.

J.M.: And what would you describe the current vibe of Josh's work nowadays?

CR: He reminds me of Tony Harris - Still visceral, but he lays out the pages much more and has taken some cues from the fine arts, like Michelangelo. I give him a script he asks a few questions and he draws it. The pages aren't always how I would do them, but I'm never disappointed.
Current Vibe=Professional
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About the Author - J.M. Hunter


J.M. Hunter is best expressed as an artist who enjoys working in many mediums. One of them is writing. In the guise of InDiY Hunter, J.M. Hunter’s focus is as an independent comics creator who interviews other Independent artists/creators and showcases their personal ideologies and stories. The “hits” and “almost-got’ems” of the creative collective that do their craft not because it’ll make them rich but because they love what they do, even when they don’t is a special kind of magic. This is the reward that keeps on giving and J.M. Hunter likes it. HE LIKES IT!

 


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